For 106 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 16% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Rachel Saltz's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 53
Highest review score: 90 Kite
Lowest review score: 20 I Do
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 28 out of 106
  2. Negative: 11 out of 106
106 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Rachel Saltz
    These are vivid, flawed, even introspective characters. And they're classic American strivers. With rodeo, but not just that, they hope to go beyond where they have been.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Rachel Saltz
    These interviews form the backbone of !W.A.R., and like the film, they're passionate, contentious, funny, sincere, politically attuned.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Rachel Saltz
    Ms. Hui, a rare successful female director in the Hong Kong film industry, drew her story from real events, and the movie retains a tonic flavor of the everyday: its drama unfolds simply, without explosive moments but not without emotion. She and her two excellent leads keep the film buoyant.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Rachel Saltz
    Patang ("The Kite"), Prashant Bhargava's first feature, has a lovely, unforced quality. That's because Mr. Bhargava lets his story, set during the annual kite festival in Ahmedabad, India, tell itself, unfolding slowly as he follows filmmaking's most basic and most sinned-against dictum: Show, don't tell.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Rachel Saltz
    As a director, Mr. Dolan has a freewheeling style, and he’s self-dramatizing enough to want to call attention to it without being too much of a visual show-off.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Rachel Saltz
    This history is too recent to seem dry, and the film gets an added emotional punch from interviews with former tenants, whose memories mix fondness with anger and loss.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Rachel Saltz
    By keeping its focus admirably tight, the sober and sobering Israeli documentary The Law in These Parts presents a devastating case against the occupation of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    The writer-director Anusha Rizvi, making her feature debut, shoots her story efficiently and with visual panache, but after a compelling setup her script runs out of juice.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    There's a lovely, unhurried quality to Mr. Hosoda's storytelling, which nicely matches the clean, classically composed images of his outer story.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    Mr. Wexler has found interesting people and useful, funny and sometimes crackpot-seeming information.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    It also shows, perceptively and often sweetly, a broader slice of young, urban, educated life in India as the three deal with careers, love and happiness.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    If the movie feels old-school (with new-school production values), consider its pedigree. It's no wonder: Shaolin is a reimagining of the 1982 "Shaolin Temple," in which Jet Li made his debut.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    Edmon Roch has a great story to tell in Garbo the Spy, and he recounts it with the flair of a Hollywood spy movie: "Garbo" is dramatic, entertaining, even funny in parts.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    Big Miracle gets off to a shaky start, but once revved up, it becomes an involving work-against-the-clock-and-the-odds action movie.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    Well made, and for once the talking-heads format is satisfying.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    Gerhard Richter may not fling paint at the canvas, Jackson Pollock-style, but as Corinna Belz shows in her documentary Gerhard Richter Painting, he can be his own kind of action painter.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    By turns frustrating and moving, Ali Samadi Ahadi's documentary The Green Wave, about the Green Revolution in Iran, gets a jolt from footage shot by the people for the people on the people's cellphones.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    The filmmakers retain a touching faith that most Americans won't tolerate injustice when they know about it. This film is meant to teach them.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    It's very much a Hindi film, but updated and delivered with conviction and style.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    The interviews are mostly good and instructive, but the well-chosen historical footage is better.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    These mostly silent home movies often have the tug of nostalgia, especially those that show domestic life... But images can be slippery, showing something different from what their creators intended. Even as Mr. Lilti constructs a history...he seems to show its fissures.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    Pitched somewhere between allegory and documentary, the film looks at its characters in a dispassionate, almost deadpan way. They’re something more than specimens under glass but something less than fully rounded people.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Rachel Saltz
    Korkoro (the word means freedom in Romani) has an unexpectedly leisurely quality as it shows the texture of Gypsy life - the music-making, the intense bonds with horses and the natural world - and its awkward fit with modernity.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Rachel Saltz
    At times you wish Mr. Marx had sharper storytelling skills (or a better editor). Some important details seem clear only in retrospect, and some remain murky. Still, Mr. Marx shines a light on a place and a way of life that are rapidly changing.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Rachel Saltz
    Has a complicated story to tell, about black surfers and, more broadly, about African-American history and the history of surfing. Great topics all, but that's a lot of ground to cover and, unsurprisingly, the film often feels a bit scattershot.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Rachel Saltz
    If the storytelling disappoints (shocking!), the film mostly doesn't. It relies on action and effects and Bollywood's trump card, star power, to carry the day. This is Mr. Khan's movie, and once he sheds Shekhar's droopy locks, he shines as the deadpan, action-hero robot with digital snot and smooth moves on the dance floor.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Rachel Saltz
    The talented Mr. Ross makes Dre's panic and adrenaline-fueled behavior all too believable. You watch as he sees his horizons dim. What could be sadder?
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Rachel Saltz
    As storytelling, "The Global Catch" often falls short. It has too much to cover to be comprehensive and can seem a bit random. As a consciousness raiser, the film fares much better.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Rachel Saltz
    Mr. Mortensen keeps you watching, even when the movie’s storytelling underwhelms. But Everybody Has a Plan is less about story than about texture and atmosphere. They stay with you, as does the haunted visage of Agustín, drifting on the delta waters.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Rachel Saltz
    The film needs an injection of Bollywood’s unembarrassed, anything-goes, bigger-than-life spirit, which embraces willy-nilly — as does Mr. Rushdie’s novel — the vulgar, the fanciful and the frankly unbelievable.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Rachel Saltz
    May not be fully satisfying as a documentary. But it has what any good movie needs: a star — the ever-game soprano Natalie Dessay.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Rachel Saltz
    While the movie has its heart in the right place, the first-time writer-director Rehana Mirza doesn't yet have the skills to shape the narrative into something moving or revealing.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Rachel Saltz
    Ms. Rao gives the city an immediacy it doesn't usually have in films. But she has more feel for mood than for storytelling.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Rachel Saltz
    At one point the lions make a meal of a lovely young zebra they've just killed. That spelled the end for the little boy sitting next to me. "I'm too scared," he said, and he dragged his mom out of the theater. Sorry, kid, it's a jungle out there, even in Disneynature.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Rachel Saltz
    Intermittently absorbing, if deliberately stripped of drama.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Rachel Saltz
    Full of indie mannerisms - compulsive swearing, jokey violence, quirk-laden characters - Flypaper can't quite manage to find a style or a comic groove of its own.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Rachel Saltz
    The fine-boned, delicate-looking Ms. Casadesus, now 97, is a pleasure to watch. And the not-delicate-looking Mr. Depardieu does his usual excellent job. But their scenes together, if sweet enough, aren't particularly convincing or moving.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Rachel Saltz
    Mr. Sarmah's film is well intentioned, but it comes off as a kind of Cliffs Notes to enlightenment.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Rachel Saltz
    What should be rousing stuff - a republic is born! the chains of feudalism thrown off! - remains a kind of lavishly illustrated history lesson. Even the irrepressible Mr. Chan (this is his 100th film) seems subdued.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Rachel Saltz
    The movie plods along self-consciously, and when the big twist occurs (you'll most likely see it coming), it complicates the plot, but not Butch, who remains a paragon. That's the problem with Blackthorn: it goes all mushy when contemplating its grizzled, out-of-time hero.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Rachel Saltz
    Chalet Girl may not be particularly creative or genre busting or even a great example of a romantic comedy. But its premise might make you smile.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Rachel Saltz
    The movie goes mushy when it should be critical, and leaves you with questions that it's not prepared to answer.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Rachel Saltz
    Deliberately small-scale, Five Time Champion has tough-minded moments but too often veers toward the sweet and even the treacly. It's pleasant enough, but too careful to be very involving.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Rachel Saltz
    Occasionally funny, though its dirty riffs - most provided by Kevin Hart as the Happily Divorced Guy - are as formulaic as its earnest parts.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Rachel Saltz
    Ms. Rohrwacher combines a documentary impulse (effective in family scenes) with a more allegorical one. Her film gets clunky when allegory has the upper hand, and that means Corpo Celeste often stumbles, along with its 12-year-old heroine, Marta (Yle Vianello).
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Rachel Saltz
    Bel Borba Aqui gives us plenty to look at, but not much to think about.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Rachel Saltz
    Fast and mostly fun, the movie also seems compulsively too much, throwing everything it can think of at you, lest it fail to entertain.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 50 Rachel Saltz
    An unpleasant comedy about friendship, aims to be a female twist on the bromance. Crude and knockabout, it nonetheless has - like many a bromance - a sloppy, sentimental heart.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Rachel Saltz
    The reunion of Ms. Caplan and Mr. Starr, cast mates on Starz network's "Party Down," seemed intriguing. That series, though, with all the fizz and social comedy that this movie lacks, was a better showcase for them.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Rachel Saltz
    A mix of gently outraged populism and low-powered romantic comedy, Vishal Bhardwaj's Matru ki Bijlee ka Mandola might have been better with a chunk lopped off its two-and-a-half-hour runtime.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Rachel Saltz
    “Re-emerging” can be pedestrian as filmmaking, though it remains interesting as long as it remains in Nigeria.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Rachel Saltz
    Mr. Marie, making his debut as a director, swathes their tale in a thick coat of style that teeters between cool and mannered.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Rachel Saltz
    “Dhoom 3” is very much the Aamir Khan show.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Rachel Saltz
    The film mixes period footage with visually unappealing contemporary interviews. If you're expecting voluble, outsize personalities with colorful war stories, you'll be disappointed.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 Rachel Saltz
    It's hard to completely dislike a movie in which Mr. James makes like Fay Wray, hitching a ride on the back of his gorilla pal, Bernie (voiced by Nick Nolte), as Bernie clambers up a bridge.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Rachel Saltz
    Undone by its very premise: that the two stories it tells can coexist in the same film.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Rachel Saltz
    Worse, you never root for Ms. Calderon's Luz, who goes from sullen to more sullen to a bit less sullen. She has discipline - to lift, she has to keep her weight down and train constantly - but not much compassion and no joy.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 40 Rachel Saltz
    Mr. Quandour's utopian vision may seem improbable - that fairy tale quality again - but his odd, guileless, folkloric movie doesn't feel cloying so much as something from a different world.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Rachel Saltz
    A wearisome mix of miserableness and dark humor.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Rachel Saltz
    Though Weil remains fascinating, Ms. Haslett's film, even when it uses more traditional documentary techniques, mostly isn't.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Rachel Saltz
    Through it all Mr. Allman, who played the skeevy Tommy on "True Blood," is a pleasant presence but blank. And Don's crisis of faith, which should be the movie's core and engine, is never really convincing. It's spelled out but dramatically inert, lost among the yuks of the Reed kookiness.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Rachel Saltz
    The filmmakers have no patience for details, either basic or telling. Their elliptical method starts to seem lazy, and Jean's plight, a journey from bad to bad, starts to seem a stacked deck. Through it all Mr. Genty holds your attention with his sober dignity. Too bad the filmmakers frequently let that slip into pathos.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Rachel Saltz
    Inoffensive and low-key, Gayby is too diffuse to have much pop when it comes to the topics at hand: love and friendship, and how unconventional modern permutations might help rewrite the script of romance.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Rachel Saltz
    The slick filmmaking - the movie has a glossy, Hollywood-ready feel that sometimes tips into the cutesy - works against its themes.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Rachel Saltz
    Aging is probably the real theme here, but it's approached sidelong and has no punch. Still, only the nostalgia has any real conviction.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Rachel Saltz
    Ambitious but uneven, Kai Po Che (based on Chetan Bhagat’s novel “The Three Mistakes of My Life”) mixes, not quite successfully, traditional Bollywood storytelling with something less conventional.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Rachel Saltz
    If only Red Flag were funnier and tighter and had a sharper idea about what it means to blur the lines between self-interrogation and self-absorption. As it is, the movie throws off too few sparks.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Rachel Saltz
    Somm, though an entree into a little-known world, rarely finds a second dimension.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Rachel Saltz
    The movie chugs along for most of its 2 hours and 20 minutes searching for comedy and characters in a frantically overplotted story.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Rachel Saltz
    The cinematographer Anil Mehta’s lovely, unfussy images ground the film and show us a good bit of India... Mr. Ali’s story, though, wanders too long and too far, sometimes coming off like a forced mash-up of “It Happened One Night” and “Patty Hearst.”
    • 28 Metascore
    • 30 Rachel Saltz
    Ms. Portes's script strains credulity, and it's not helped by Mr. Martini, who can't find the right tone.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Rachel Saltz
    It’s dragged down by non-scene after non-scene, and filmmaking choices that don’t earn their keep.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Rachel Saltz
    Leonie Gilmour was almost certainly unusual and unusually self-reliant. Too bad that the film that bears her name ultimately reduces her to the mother of her child.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 30 Rachel Saltz
    One reason Chander Pahar seems so plodding is that Mr. Mukherjee has a habit of telling us what he doesn’t know how to show.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 20 Rachel Saltz
    Lost in all this is Halston, who comes through only in dribs and drabs. If you're curious about him, skip this film. Read about him - you'll learn far more on his Wikipedia page - and look at his clothes. And if you're a filmmaker, go out and make a decent movie about him: he deserves it.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 20 Rachel Saltz
    In a better movie you might play along with contrived plot twists and fake obstacles, but watching I Do, a movie with thin characters and a languorous pace, you find yourself talking back to the screen.