For 488 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Rex Reed's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Mao's Last Dancer
Lowest review score: 0 Melancholia
Score distribution:
488 movie reviews
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Based on a story by Edgar Allan Poe, directed with style and imagination by Brad Anderson (The Machinist), filmed in the creepy darkness of Bulgaria (you hardly get this kind of movie anymore), and starring an illustrious cast solid and dedicated enough to craft to make you believe they’re in a depraved version of Hamlet staged in Elsinore Castle, this is a movie that is several cuts above your usual straitjacket thriller. Enter at your own risk.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Although the going is so sluggish at times that the film often looks like it needs artificial respiration, stick it out. The end result is oddly entertaining.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    The case is revisited with painstaking detail, and a riveting picture emerges once again about misunderstood outsiders.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Mr. Fiennes admirably humanizes the characters while exploring their contradictions and emphasizing their feelings. But his no-frills direction is a bit stodgy for my taste, and although this is not the Dickens you’d ever pay to hear read "Little Dorrit," there’s more vitality in his performance than the film itself.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    In a movie without adults, the children are spontaneous and natural. And Ms. Ronan is captivating throughout.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Heading toward his destination as a decent man facing ruin by doing the right thing, Mr. Hardy does a great job acting out the phases of anxiety frustration, confusion, exasperation and ultimate resolve — while working overtime to save a movie that takes place entirely on a cell phone from getting boring.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    For sure, it’s another example of style over substance — a richly deserved accusation that is always leveled at this kindergarten cop of a director, but I confess it’s a lot of scattered and disjointed fun.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Entertaining dialogue and a collection of tightly knit performances — especially a wonderful, unexpectedly funny star turn by Andy Garcia — make At Middleton a nice surprise.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    It’s a universal, American “anyone can make it” success story that has uplifting appeal onstage, and in Mr. Eastwood’s capable hands, the joy spreads like apple butter.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    It’s not for the squeamish, but thanks to a riveting central performance by Vanessa Hudgens and a compassionate screenplay by Ron Krauss, who also directed, this is a far more sobering and substantial exposé of homeless teenage girls on the dangerous edge of society than you might expect.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    When it finally ended, I felt like I had traveled the distance in the next sleeping bag. It’s exhausting but exhilarating.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Unpredictable, with a twisted surprise around each corner, Big Bad Wolves is a clever and arresting shocker from a country where blood and gore on the screen are least expected.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Downbeat, depressing and heavy as lead, Calvary is nevertheless an unusual film that never bores. Impeccable performances by Chris O’Dowd, Aiden Gillen, M. Emmett Walsh and Kelly Reilly are riveting. And Mr. Gleeson is a bear-like centerpiece of conflicts and contradictions who anchors the floating pieces of the Irish puzzle in faith and doctrine, while mercifully refusing to sermonize.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    The question is: how much should one talented but sensitive individual be willing to suffer for his art at the hands of one brilliant but terrifying bully? The two stars are fully committed to the concept that the pursuit of perfection doesn’t always triumph, and the film pounds in the temples with the feverish tempo of a jazz riff.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Turns out to be more suspenseful and keenly plotted than most, with a compelling centerpiece performance by Dan Stevens (Downton Abbey) that deserves attention.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    As much as I liked it, I have to admit Run & Jump is a work of no action — of love unrequited, feelings unexpressed and goals never reached. Sitting through it requires great patience. I don’t think this is an Ireland that would interest John Ford.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    The film, written and directed by Martha Stephens and Aaron Katz, is slow as Christmas, but the two protagonists grow on you, like a Virginia creeper vine climbing a garden wall.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    You get compassion and intelligence instead of cracker-barrel homilies. And you get mesmerizing performances.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Linus Sandgren’s lush camerawork and the glittering, throbbing musical score by A. R. Rahman contribute a distinctive flavor of their own. The performances are superb.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Walking With the Enemy is a powerful piece of filmmaking that examines history and heroism with big-screen artistry, imagination and thrills.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Force Majeure is a good movie, but as thought provoking as the ending is, it peters out ineffectually, while the actual staging of the avalanche to the crashing movements of Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons” seems vaguely comedic and disappointingly corny, if you ask me.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    The intelligence and unhackneyed humor of the believable, unself-conscious screenplay by fledgling director Mr. Zwick (son of veteran director Edward Zwick) deserves special praise. It never hits a false note.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Aiysha Hart delivers a mesmerizing performance.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Rex Reed
    This gruesome thriller set in a fogbound insane asylum is incomprehensible and fatally flawed, but having said all of that, I will also say this: It never seems anything less than the work of a skillful film buff. Mr. Scorsese may be a smart aleck, but he’s a professional smart aleck.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Rex Reed
    But the direction by Joe Johnston (Honey, I Shrunk the Kids) sacrifices originality for computer graphics and stop-motion camera tricks, and the script, by Andrew Kevin Walker and David Self, bulges with real howlers: “I didn’t know you hunted monsters.” “Sometimes monsters hunt you!”
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Rex Reed
    I found Howl a fascinating and imaginative evocation of mid-20th-century liberation, a mere and merciful 90 minutes long.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Rex Reed
    Think Arnold Schwarzenegger in "Kindergarten Cop," but better.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Rex Reed
    The great screenwriter Steven Zaillian's elaborate, convoluted script, so muddled that even after it's over you still don't know what it's all about, is a drawback - but the movie is a master class in sinister style, tense and deeply uncomfortable.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Rex Reed
    This futuristic tale of teenage violence is so not my kind of movie that I approached it grudgingly, so imagine my surprise when I ended up being totally exhilarated and enjoying it immensely.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Rex Reed
    I found Contagion both flawed and fascinating, but it's not an entertainment.