For 590 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Rex Reed's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Prisoners
Lowest review score: 0 Murder of a Cat
Score distribution:
590 movie reviews
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    The intelligence and unhackneyed humor of the believable, unself-conscious screenplay by fledgling director Mr. Zwick (son of veteran director Edward Zwick) deserves special praise. It never hits a false note.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Turns out to be more suspenseful and keenly plotted than most, with a compelling centerpiece performance by Dan Stevens (Downton Abbey) that deserves attention.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    When it finally ended, I felt like I had traveled the distance in the next sleeping bag. It’s exhausting but exhilarating.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    The question is: how much should one talented but sensitive individual be willing to suffer for his art at the hands of one brilliant but terrifying bully? The two stars are fully committed to the concept that the pursuit of perfection doesn’t always triumph, and the film pounds in the temples with the feverish tempo of a jazz riff.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    It never scales the cinematic heights or reaches the same groundbreaking level as "Saving Private Ryan," but it’s intensely ferocious and relentlessly rough on the senses. You’ll know you’ve been to war, and not on the Hollywood front.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Based on a story by Edgar Allan Poe, directed with style and imagination by Brad Anderson (The Machinist), filmed in the creepy darkness of Bulgaria (you hardly get this kind of movie anymore), and starring an illustrious cast solid and dedicated enough to craft to make you believe they’re in a depraved version of Hamlet staged in Elsinore Castle, this is a movie that is several cuts above your usual straitjacket thriller. Enter at your own risk.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Force Majeure is a good movie, but as thought provoking as the ending is, it peters out ineffectually, while the actual staging of the avalanche to the crashing movements of Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons” seems vaguely comedic and disappointingly corny, if you ask me.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    It keeps you creeped out and fascinated.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Another war biopic opening on Christmas day, with tight, two-fisted direction by Clint Eastwood, and a compelling centerpiece performance by Bradley Cooper.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    As vital as it is, racial strife is a subject that cries out for a more volatile treatment than this. The Alabama marching sequences and resulting violence, filmed in Selma, where they actually happened, are too understated for my taste. And the home life of King and his vacillating wife Coretta are muted.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Nimble, off the beaten track and very entertaining, it’s the cinematic equivalent of a lava lamp.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Another example of concept over coherence, but the entertainment value is considerable.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Paddington is a harmless delight that blends live action with animated technology in the manner of "Ted," but without the raunch.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Directed by Kevin Macdonald (The Last King of Scotland), it’s basically another tough genre workout that is all too familiar, with enough tension and violence to keep an audience alert if not riveted.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Depression is a tricky subject for a movie aimed at a target audience that is depressed enough already. But this one justifies its challenges to feel-good escapism through honesty and integrity.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Good acting and plenty to think about, but a better director than Mike Binder would have made a better film.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    It’s a tormented Tony Perkins at the Bates Motel, re-imagined by "Saturday Night Live," with all the risks implied.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Unlike anything you’ve ever seen before. What the bloodsuckers in this frolic actually do, in or out of the shadows, is make you laugh.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    It might prove to be too insular to appeal to a wider movie audience, but to a passionate Anglophile like me, Queen and Country is a funny and nostalgic portrait of a bleak, rationed postwar England still digging its way out of the rubble.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    It’s beautifully photographed and entertaining, with charming performances by Will Smith and newcomer Margot Robbie that tease and tantalize. You won’t be bored.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Anthony Hopkins plays the king of the hops, and he is excellent. So is the rest of the movie, a sober, no-frills account about the highest ransom ever collected up to that time — $10 million and counting.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    The senior set deserves a few crumpets with their tea, and Part Two, which takes up where the original left off, aims to satisfy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Every generation gets a new one, and this time, replete with computer graphics and singing mice, Kenneth Branagh has created a live-action fairy tale that pulls out every stop and spares no expense.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    From this less than enchanting excuse for a feature-length movie comes 5 to 7, featuring delicious performances, extremely witty dialogue without the customary Hollywood television punch lines, a convincing believability quotient, and some beautiful cameos, especially by Glenn Close and Frank Langella as Mr. Yelchin’s disapproving but modern, adaptable parents.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    The movie moves as slowly as the oncoming fog, but Juliette Binoche is always a pleasure to watch, despite an awkward coda set in London that I found jarring.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    It’s a metaphorical stretch for a simple movie title, but never mind. Closer to the Moon still manages to be a strange blend of history, black humor and art.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    There is a lot to admire here. Writer-director Alejandro Monteverde (Bella) is not afraid to take his time letting you get to know the characters or moving things along, but the movie never seems ponderous.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Its virtues are many and this filmed version of Hardy’s fourth novel is well worth seeing. It rises head and shoulders above most of what we’ve been seeing lately.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    Better films about senior citizens displaced by a greedy housing market have been made. (Anyone for Vittorio De Sica’s Umberto D, or Ira Sachs’ recent heartbreaker Love is Strange, about a homeless elderly gay couple?) But the humorous script by Charlie Peters (based on a novel by Jill Ciment), fluidly directed by Richard Loncraine, makes this an agreeable experience.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Rex Reed
    It’s a high-class thriller without a single goose bump, but between the mother, the daughter, the lawyer, the Mafia, and the investors determined to separate Renée from her money and power, there’s enough material to juggle several balls in the air at the same time.

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