Richard Corliss

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For 966 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Richard Corliss' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Singin' in the Rain
Lowest review score: 0 Untraceable
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 97 out of 966
966 movie reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    Small in stature but consistently entertaining, Seven Psychopaths is a vacation from consequence for the Tony- and Oscar-winning author, and an unsupervised play date for his cast of screw-loose stars.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    It's an enjoyably old-fashioned shoot-out, if you can shake off the current headlines and sink in to a fantasy of hyper-violence that plays like an NRA vision of America the Beautiful.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    An action figure with a sweet core, Johnson can pump up the humanity of any franchise, whether he’s playing a stepdad who becomes a hero in Journey 2 or, as here, a stud soldier who treats Flint and Jaye like his grown children and shepherds them through peril. Following those younger Joes, the Retaliation audience is encouraged to clamber up on Johnson’s huge soldiers and go along for a pretty cool ride.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    It's like a giant sculpture that is so strange and off-putting, it's instantly, intriguingly post-modern. Swept up in the film's pile-driving self-assurance, even Bay-haters may absorb the pain to enjoy the gain.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    Nair sleekly manages the story’s thriller aspects, especially the kidnapping. But this is a character study, and she has found some superb actors to fill it.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    This Mafia tale doesn’t aspire to the heights of a "Godfather" or the epic sprawl of "The Sopranos." Vromen and cowriter Morgan Land are content to bring subtle shadings to the tale of a strange man in a dirty business.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    The actors emote up a summer storm. Maguire’s otherworldly coolness suits the observer drawn into a story he might prefer only to watch. DiCaprio is persuasive as the little boy lost impersonating a tough guy, and Mulligan finds ways to express Daisy’s magnetism and weakness.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    This series will survive as well, until 2016 — when, you can bet, there will be a third Star Trek to celebrate the TV show’s 50th anniversary. Here’s hoping that those three years will bestow a measure of maturity on all concerned: Kirk and his bright curators too.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    Furious 6 is even cooler and more aerodynamically delirious than its predecessor, if such a thing is even theoretically possible.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    The action is plentiful and thumping; Marvel-size thrills await you and the generations of kids who still believe in Superman. I just mean that the movie finds its true, lofty footing not when it displays Kal-El’s extraordinary powers but when it dramatizes Clark Kent’s roiling humanity. The super part of Man of Steel is just O.K.; but the man part is super.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    The new film is more an embellishment than an improvement on the snazzy Raiders.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    Here’s the oddest element in this tale of Hollywood fine-tuning run rampant: the movie is pretty good — the summer’s most urgent, highest-IQ action picture.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    Let all Marvel franchises have as long a life as Logan. But could Singer let Jackman sing a few numbers as the knife-fingered mutant? They could call it Les Scissorables.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    It’s Roberts’ deepest, strongest, liveliest film work.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    Inside Llewyn Davis is more deserving of a Grammy than an Oscar. Problematic movie, great album.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    A delicate counterpoise of passion and restraint, The Invisible Woman is a major work in a minor key.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    Mitty is a lovely romantic comedy — the portrait of a man, nearly swallowed by the gulf between the world his lives in and the world he dreams of, who manages to bridge the two and to find Ms. Right in the workplace he cherishes.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    A reboot of an A-level spy series seems too pretty-good to be true. Shadow Recruit occupies this weekend’s movie screens as familiarly and reassuringly as a Walther PPK fits in the hand of James Bond.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    Rather than juicing each element to blockbuster volume, Clooney has delivered it in the tone of a memorial lecture, warm and ambling, given by one of the distinguished academics he put in his movie.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    With more sentiment and splash than the original’s sharp wit, Mr. Peabody & Sherman ends up teaching the same lesson as “Peabody’s Improbable History”: every dog should have a boy.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    It’s as if von Trier shot the main scenes while in one of his famous depressive funks, then edited the film in a more cheerful, impish mood. At times, the tantalizing mixture of sexual neurosis and wayward humor in this memoir of a woman of pleasure suggests a collision between "Fanny Hill" and "Annie Hall."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    The best comic turns are by the Afro-Asian twins Keith and Kenny Lucas, whose timing is eerie and superb.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    When it gets going, it’s a pretty fine movie.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    Gaudily entertaining, occasionally wearying sequel.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    The cluttered climax, in a Mother Bates cellar, explains little of the killers’ psychology; for that you have to read the book. But it does let Neeson assert his primacy as the cinema’s most graven, grieving, grievous senior citizen — a figure who doesn’t so much star in his films as haunt them. This ghost of a movie star is never more at home than when walking among the tombstones.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    The lumpiness of The Good Lie’s progression – from infancy to adulthood, and from the horrors of war to gentle social comedy and back again – proclaims a respect for facts and truths that can’t be molded into a smooth narrative.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    World War II was a historical event, but also a movie genre, and Fury occasionally prints the legend. The rest of it is plenty grim and grisly. Audience members may feel like prisoners of war forced to watch a training-torture film.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    Quibbles aside, John Wick is the smartest display of the implacable but somehow ethical Reeves character since the "2008 Street Kings."
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    Never quite transcending the sum of its agreeably disparate parts, IV is less groovy than gnarled and goofy, but in a studied way. Call it an acquired taste with a kinky savor.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Corliss
    Tatum’s is the central performance: most daring because it’s least giving. He has often played young men of thick athleticism and slow wit. It’s proof of Tatum’s intelligence that he can make the audience feel smarter than the characters he plays – until they reveal a sly brilliance halfway through the movie.

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