For 526 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Rita Kempley's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Who Framed Roger Rabbit
Lowest review score: 0 8 Heads in a Duffel Bag
Score distribution:
526 movie reviews
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Rita Kempley
    Howard entices us into overlooking the film's faults with some genuinely amusing scenes, particularly those featuring Japanese-American Gedde Watanabe as a beleaguered Assan executive who doesn't fit the corporate mold. [14 Mar 1986, p.27]
    • Washington Post
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Rita Kempley
    A corkscrew of a thriller, has more twists than a tarantula with a permanent.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Rita Kempley
    Linklater, who introduced the blithe, but bemused slacker subculture to America in 1991, gets bogged down not only in Bogosian's for-stage structure, but especially his middle-aged perspective.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Rita Kempley
    Rusnak, who was the second-unit director of "Godzilla," brings plenty of style to this ambitious yet utterly anticlimactic thumb-sucker.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Rita Kempley
    The topic certainly suits the times, but the director's approach is as alienating as it is old-fashioned.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Rita Kempley
    Though he is a master thief with a heart of gold, the new Templar has all the charm of one of those ladies behind the counter at the Department of Motor Vehicles.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Rita Kempley
    Oscar and Lucinda seems like the perfect story for director Gillian Armstrong, that of a free-spirited proto-feminist chafing at the strictures of tight-laced colonial Australia. But in the end, she's created a beautiful but annoying Victorian-era melodrama. [30Jan1998 Pg.D.06]
    • Washington Post
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Rita Kempley
    A queasy union of savagery and uplift, the film ought to be unnerving. Instead, it finally becomes routine. [18Apr1997 Pg. C.07]
    • Washington Post
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Rita Kempley
    How many times can we be awestruck by Day-Glo Gumbies? And why do these creatures always travel with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir?
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Rita Kempley
    Baldly manipulative, emotionally counterfeit melodrama.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Rita Kempley
    The film fleetingly touches on the underfunding of schools and other administrative problems as well as the more compelling personal issues of teen pregnancy and violence. But the characters are so poorly drawn and underdeveloped that they seem to be little more than personifications of these societal ills.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Rita Kempley
    The trouble is, we don't really much care about this philandering billionaire glamour puss, who seems perfectly capable of taking care of herself. We don't care about her husband or lover either.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Rita Kempley
    Bad movies have a way of writing their own epitaphs.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Rita Kempley
    Tired conventions, hoary themes and obvious conclusions.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Rita Kempley
    Tea With Mussolini is really about the first women in the Italian director's life. It's drawn from a single chapter of his book but suffers from a lack of focus. None of these great ladies is willing to give up center stage; nor, for that matter, are the grande dames who bring them so vividly to life.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Rita Kempley
    Hardware doesn't make a movie; characters, be they Blawp or human, do. And as so often happens with such outsize undertakings, they are overwhelmed by the gizmos. Technology, one. Astros, naught.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Rita Kempley
    The region's stark beauty and the filmmaker's eye for composition compensate somewhat for its predictability and obvious if misguided feminist agenda.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Rita Kempley
    A mite sluggish.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Rita Kempley
    He's slightly more articulate than usual, but the lines still fall from his lips like beaten boxers to the mat. Not that it much matters, given the constant mayhem.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Rita Kempley
    Despite its hopeful title and a warm inland location, this dawdling family dramedy proves as sodden as a bed-wetter's mattress.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Rita Kempley
    In some ways, Contact is just like the universe: big, star-bright and seemingly endless. Not to mention that it begins with a big bang, gradually falls into a lull and finally succumbs to entropy.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Rita Kempley
    He's obsessed with the physical details instead of the human emotions. The actors are really just part of the scenery.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Rita Kempley
    Alas, it's too coarsely drawn and broadly directed by Brit Jonathan Lynn to effectively skewer what ought to have been an easy target.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Rita Kempley
    Unfortunately, the filmmaking couple take the fetishistic masquerade far too seriously. They may describe it as a "departure" from traditional fare, but it's simply the same old action-packed guff.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Rita Kempley
    It couldn't be any less revolutionary in style. It is straighter than a guitar string.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Rita Kempley
    Sparse and implausible screenplay.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Rita Kempley
    Hardly a real pip (indeed, it has been rendered Pip-less), but then this loosey-goosey adaptation isn't aimed at those of us with library cards.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Rita Kempley
    The Empire strikes out.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Rita Kempley
    The story's tired, as are the main characters.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Rita Kempley
    Producer Ismail Merchant, director James Ivory and screenwriter Ruth Prawer Jhabvala bring the customary polish, but no pizzazz, to this simplistic portrait of the artist as a dirty old man.

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