For 90 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1 point lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Rob Nelson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Mysteries of Lisbon
Lowest review score: 10 Killers
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 41 out of 90
  2. Negative: 12 out of 90
90 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    The picture scores big points by drawing a sharp distinction between corporate vidgame programmers and indies.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    An aptly infuriating expose of sexual abuse within the U.S. military, Kirby Dick's documentary The Invisible War calls high-ranking officials to account for turning a blind eye to a violent epidemic.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    Audaciously giving itself license to do whatever it wants, Leos Carax's narratively unhinged, beautifully shot and frequently hilarious Holy Motors coheres -- arguably, anyway -- into a vivid jaunt through the auteur's cinematic obsessions.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    The clearest achievement of Dolan’s typically self-indulgent eye-popper comes in equating its gender-bending protagonist’s metamorphoses with those in any relationship that lasts for years.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    It takes pains to make the political personal, forging the viewer’s identification with Scahill by making persistent use of his voiceover narration and keeping him oncamera throughout.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    The brisk, brief feature appears more atmospheric than terrifying, but its bare-bones tale gets under the skin.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    Escape From Tomorrow is a sneakily subversive exercise in low-budget surrealism and anti-corporate satire.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    Camp X-Ray is most commendable for believably depicting the U.S. military from a female’s point of view.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    Rossato-Bennett’s over-the-top narration often sounds cloying and banal... But the filmmaker succeeds in providing context, medical and historical, in between awakenings.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    The docu’s accomplished summary of tension-filled events as they transpired from minute to minute comes at the expense of wide-angle historical context.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Rob Nelson
    Paramount's Footloose reboot never quite cuts loose enough to distinguish itself from the original.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Rob Nelson
    This disarmingly cheeky, intermittently gorgeous trifle would create the perfect bookend to a career begun almost 50 years ago.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Rob Nelson
    The movie is witty only on occasion. But it lingers in the mind, thanks largely to its trio of actors -- especially Alex Karpovsky.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Rob Nelson
    Payback is a rarefied conceptual documentary that will appeal to a limited but highly appreciative audience.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Rob Nelson
    This low-budget shocker eventually pays off, displaying just enough narrative ingenuity to compensate for a cinematically crude and logistically sketchy deployment of the requisite blood-and-guts mayhem.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Rob Nelson
    First-time writer-director Stephen Chbosky adapts his young-adult bestseller with far more passion than skill, which suits familiar scenes of adolescent awkwardness aptly enough.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Rob Nelson
    This merciless work of anti-entertainment is arguably admirable for being as disturbingly disgusting as it wants to be.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Rob Nelson
    Overly melodramatic but fairly engrossing.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    This fawning docu goes to lengths to portray the octogenarian Playboy magazine founder as among the greatest figures of 20th-century American popular culture, while only cursorily acknowledging his status as a pioneering softcore pornographer.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    We Bought a Zoo is an odd bird, warm-blooded but largely lifeless.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    Far less chilling than versions from 1951 and 1982, Universal's latest take on The Thing at least has a strong lead thesp in Mary Elizabeth Winstead, recruited for the studio's bid to turn a tale of ice-cold macho paranoia into a beauty-vs.-beast shocker a la "Alien."
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    Waiting for Super to deliver the funny is an experience as long as the film itself.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    A movie that tries and fails to channel the indelibly dreamy mood of Sofia Coppola's "The Virgin Suicides." Well-intentioned but derivative and only intermittently engaging, the suburban Michigan-set indie hits at least as many false notes as true ones.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    A weaker "Elephant," Quebecois director Denis Villeneuve's school-shooting drama Polytechnique nevertheless distinguishes itself by endeavoring to comprehend the 25-year-old man who murdered more than a dozen female students at Montreal's Polytechnique School in 1989.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    Alternately gutsy and preachy, specific and scattered, the righteously angry pic risks alienating those who could be galvanized by its proof of Big Oil's corrupting omnipotence.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    Variably articulate subjects drone on and on in an 83-minute film that could easily make its TV news-style point in a half-hour or less.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    Solidly acted but aloof and slow as molasses.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    A literary film that stands to work best for those who don't read, The Words is a slick, superficially clever compendium of stories about authors of uncertain talent and varying success.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    A costumer that's well named for being pleasant and conventional but little more.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    Oddly overstuffed with cameos by bigscreen actors playing tongue-in-cheek versions of themselves, Webber's Los Angeles-set, microbudget dramedy delivers some rare and beautiful moments of daddy day-care, but its tone shifts more wildly than a preschooler's disposition and its narrative is stillborn.