For 1,507 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Rob Owen's Scores

Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Homeland: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Momma's Boys: Season 1
Score distribution:
1507 tv reviews
    • 19 Metascore
    • 30 Rob Owen
    What began as a sublimely ridiculous pop culture sensation devolved over its first five films into just a junky exercise in bloated storytelling and C-list celebrity-spotting. No. 6 is more of the same with an often nonsensical time travel story.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 58 Rob Owen
    The first two episodes of “Disenchantment” are more amusing than funny with entertaining enough puns and parodies of modern-day brands in the names of shops in the Kingdom of Dreamland.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 65 Rob Owen
    Lodge 49 goes down easy but perhaps too easy. It feels unessential in the 500-series era, an OK diversion but not a must-see series.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Rob Owen
    The season premiere, written by Mr. Gould, serves as a warm-up act for the season’s more gripping second episode that features at least two remarkable scenes with bravura performances: Jimmy self-sabotaging and Kim, in a searing performance by Ms. Seehorn, ripping into Howard Hamlin (Patrick Fabian).
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Rob Owen
    Through its first three episodes, Castle Rock builds out its world and character relationships thoughtfully and deliberately. Whether it holds up through the entire 10-episode first season remains to be seen, but Castle Rock gets off to a strong, engrossing start.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 55 Rob Owen
    Casting Ms. Kreuk as an anti-hero would be a unique twist but Burden quickly undoes that, settling for the more pedestrian idea of Joanna crusading for the little guy while also, thankfully, voiding the notion that the show is pro anti-vaxxer.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Rob Owen
    Imagine a low-rent “Game of Thrones” wannabe with bargain basement special effects and a paint-by-numbers plot and you’ve got a good conception of the fantasy drama "The Outpost."
    • 76 Metascore
    • 65 Rob Owen
    Ms. Chenoweth is a smart addition but the humor is often too broad and, worse, predictable. When the show’s humor offers a more surprising take, Trial & Error shines--the “East Peck Lady Laws of 1952” are particularly amusing--but that seems to happen with less frequency in season two.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 59 Rob Owen
    The first two Sharp Objects episodes take a slow-burn approach--too slow--but the pace picks up in episode three as Sharp Objects delves deeper into Camille’s back story and as Camille begins to connect with suspects in the case. That’s probably OK for fans of the novel, but for the rest of us, it’s a tough early slog in an era of myriad TV series choices.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Owen
    The two-hour “Yellowstone” pilot is both talky and somewhat predictable as it establishes the characters, their relationships and conflicts. But future episodes offer more surprises and deepen the characters--flashbacks help establish why Beth is the way she is--making “Yellowstone” an enticing summer diversion.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Rob Owen
    For fans of darker, soapier TV fare, the light-as-a-feather “Take Two” will be a hard pass, but for a light drama it’s entertaining enough, thanks to producers poking fun at TV procedural cliches (while also embracing them) and Ms. Bilson’s likable performance.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Owen
    Written by novelist Patrick Gale, “Man in an Orange Shirt,” airing timed to national Pride Month, tells stories both familiar and heartfelt (the consequences of repression; not being true to yourself) but also occasionally surprising (“open relationships” come into play in the second, contemporary-set hour).
    • 58 Metascore
    • 45 Rob Owen
    In its early going, Strange Angel just isn’t strange enough to warrant sustained viewer interest.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 68 Rob Owen
    While the show’s first hour doesn’t inspire much confidence in the series, save for a poignant scene between Tyrone and his mother (Gloria Reuben), the second episode gives the characters more depth and allows for a little more light to sneak into the generally dark (tonally and visually) proceedings.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Owen
    After a slow start early in the pilot episode, the pace quickens, turning Condor into a taut, violent, compulsively watchable series for fans of “24”-style thrillers.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 48 Rob Owen
    Imagine a Don Draper-less, bland, unsurprising sequel to “Mad Men” and “American Woman” comes pretty close. All the plot twists are telegraphed.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 65 Rob Owen
    Whether Dietland can sustain the will-Plum-get-caught? story remains to be seen, but early episodes show promise.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Rob Owen
    The character-based stories grow more effective over time as viewers come to care about the characters’ love lives and hardships.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Owen
    The tone of the pilot makes jarring shifts, but episode two settles into a comfortably arch take on the hubris and egocentrism shared by members of the Roy clan.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Rob Owen
    Structurally, Arrested is in better shape than it was in season four. Fans who temper their expectations for this new batch of episodes--eight are available this week with another eight coming later this year--will be happy to be back with the terrible Bluth family.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 45 Rob Owen
    It’s all quite predictable and dull with a pilot episode that suffers under the weight of technobabble-filled exposition.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 65 Rob Owen
    In Evil Genius, Mr. Borzillieri offers an attempt at an “ah-ha!” moment in the final episode. But the filmmakers’ thesis is not completely convincing. Other evidence presented in Evil Genius suggests a less clean cut, more nuanced scenario may be closer to the truth.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Rob Owen
    At times, it’s still tough to watch. But Mr. Cumberbatch brings wit and flashes of wicked humor to a story of childhood trauma and its impact on one man’s life via substance abuse and mental illness.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Owen
    Warm, welcoming and occasionally tear-jerking, this three-hour production goes down like a warm glass of milk at bedtime.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Rob Owen
    It feels authentic, save for one calculated-to-take-advantage-of-premium-cable scene in the premiere (characters on TV seem more prone to engage in grief-fueled sex at funeral receptions than people do in real life).
    • 52 Metascore
    • 45 Rob Owen
    Sweetbitter certainly presents recognizable characters, situations and reactions that may have an appeal to young people who are living on their own for the first time in a big city, but it has precious little new to add to that familiar experience.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Rob Owen
    While Handmaid’s Tale comes across as more disturbing because the world it creates actually feels like it could come to pass. Neither program [Handmaid's Tale or Westworld] is an easy viewing experience; both shows represent today’s TV at its best.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 85 Rob Owen
    It takes a bit for Westworld to get back up to full steam, but by episode three (five hours were made available to TV critics), this futuristic, violent drama returns to fine form, introducing new parts of the park (Shogun World!), new characters and apparently new technology goals on the part of Delos, the corporation that owns Westworld.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 55 Rob Owen
    It’s a dark, sometimes dreary Lost in Space with great special effects and some interesting character relationships that sit awkwardly alongside predictable plots.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Rob Owen
    It’s an engaging (and, perhaps to some defenders of Joe Paterno, it will be an enraging) film that explores character, the politics of college athletics and the value of local journalism in a style that’s more process piece thriller than it is anything like a biopic given how “Paterno” concentrates on a short period in the coach’s life.

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