Robbie Collin
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For 141 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Robbie Collin's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Like Someone in Love
Lowest review score: 0 May I Kill U?
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 65 out of 141
  2. Negative: 13 out of 141
141 movie reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    At first, watching Pacific Rim feels like rediscovering a favourite childhood cartoon – but del Toro has flooded the project with such affection and artistry that, rather than smiling nostalgically, you find yourself enchanted all over again.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    A science-fiction thriller of rare and diamond-hard brilliance.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    This is instant A-list Coens; enigmatic, exhilarating, irresistible.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    Like Someone in Love, is another miracle at close quarters. Its subject is the impossibility of intimacy in the modern world: chewy stuff, to be sure, but Kiarostami explores it with a depth and delicacy that recalls the Japanese master Yasujiro Ozu.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    As hot and wet as freshly butchered meat: every second, every frame of its three-hour running time is virile with a lifetime’s accumulated genius.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    Mikkelsen, who is not given to sympathetic roles, has never been better. This is cinema that sinks its claws into your back.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    It is one of the year’s very best films, a great, rumbling thunderclap of genius.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    This is a masterpiece of serious cinema; long, slow and grave as the grave.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    Kore-eda has crafted a piercing, tender poem about the bittersweet ebb and flow of paternal love, and his status as Ozu's heir becomes ever more assured.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    Wheatley’s extraordinary film shakes you back and forth with a rare ferocity, but the net result is stillness.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    A shimmering coup de cinema to make your heart burst, your mind swim and your soul roar.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    So hauntingly perfect is Barnard’s film, and so skin-pricklingly alive does it make you feel to watch it, that at first you can hardly believe the sum of what you have seen.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    It is an extraordinary, prolonged popping-candy explosion of pleasure, sadness, anger, lust and hope.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    Miller finds grand, America-describing themes in the interactions between these three men: the extraordinary influence of inherited wealth, the hunkered-down ambition of working-class athletes, the equation of material success with honour and moral rectitude.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    Every shot of Stray Dogs has been built with utter formal mastery; every sequence exerts an almost telepathic grip.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    Glazer’s astonishing film takes you to a place where the everyday becomes suddenly strange, and fear and seduction become one and the same.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    It’s an astonishing achievement. Linklater and his cast, who helped refine the director’s script, perfectly execute how long it takes us to become the lead characters in our own lives, and how fumblingly the role is first assumed.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    There’s so much in this seething cauldron of a film, so many film-industry neuroses exposed and horrors nested within horrors, that one viewing is too much, and not nearly enough. Cronenberg has made a film that you want to unsee – and then see and unsee again.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    Beyond the troughful of fun tics, Spall makes Turner tenderly and totally human — the effect of which is to make his artistic talents seem even more extraordinary still.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    The film comes and goes without commotion, but its magic settles on you as softly and as steadily as dust.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Black has an instinctive feel for balancing action set-pieces against the passages of soap-opera that are required to make them matter.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    The animation is photoreal – startlingly and mesmerisingly so. And the depth of feeling the tale of their friendship evokes is matched only by your incredulity, as you paw at your eyes six minutes later, that you are crying about two computer-generated umbrellas.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    In lesser hands, Elysium might have played like a Lib Dem manifesto with extra spaceships, but the South African filmmaker wants to explore ideas, not wave placards, and whether or not you agree with the film’s politics, the fire in its belly is catching.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    It’s a critic’s instinct to auto-praise any blockbuster that tries to do something different, but Catching Fire is so committed to carrying on the fine work started by its predecessor that the applause flows utterly naturally.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Just squeezably lovely.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Aronofsky’s sixth film is not the Noah you know, but a hundred-million-dollar Chinese whisper; a familiar story made newly poetic and strange with a flavour that’s less Genesis than Revelation.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    For a shot of pure forward-leaping, backward-dreaming animated pleasure, pick brick.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    The fun of it – and Guardians of the Galaxy specialises in fun, served by the sugar-sprinkled ice-cream-scoopload – is in seeing this odd quintet bluster through space battles and alien brawls that would have defeated anyone smarter and better-equipped. Just as the team makes do with the junk they find around them, the film feels like a mound of gems culled from decades of pop-culture scavenging.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    The World’s End is a fitting end to the trilogy: it is by turns trashy, poignant and gut-bustingly funny, and often all three at once.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Could this be the late-emerging hit movie of summer 2013? No chance, although if this was August 1987, a time when we allowed action films to be smart on their own dumb terms, it might have cleaned up.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    This Iberian spin on the Snow White legend is a curio and a wonder; a silent fairy tale woven from softest velvet.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Goro Miyazaki’s film is about the point at which we decide not what we want to be when we grow up, but who, and the way the tiniest moments in our lives often have the most far-reaching effect.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Vogt-Roberts manages the neat trick of making his film feel both nostalgic and current.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Coppola’s uproarious and bitingly timely film feels every inch a necessary artwork.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    What gives the film its lip-smacking, chilli-pepper kick is that we are never entirely certain who is conning whom, or even if what we are watching has any truth to it at all.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Flies buzz, sweat trickles, negotiations continue, and you feel your breath dry up.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Love is All You Need has been made for an audience rarely catered for by the film industry: intelligent adults who enjoy perceptive and good-hearted drama.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Paradise: Love flits nimbly between humour and sadness, and treats potentially ponderous themes such as sex, race and the rancid legacy of colonialism with a welcome light touch.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Fill the Void is a real collector’s item: a film in which the forces of religion and tradition are shown to be working together, however haltingly and imperfectly, for the good.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    This is a resounding return to form for Payne: there are moments that recall his earlier road movies About Schmidt and Sideways, but it has a wistful, shuffling, grizzly-bearish rhythm all of its own.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Because genre lets us know roughly what to expect, it can put us at ease, which is the last thing Denis wants to do. So she leaves questions hanging and mysteries unsolved.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    The real reason to see this is Swinton and Hiddleston’s sexy, pallid double act: two old souls in hot bodies who have long tired of this Earth, but have nowhere else to make their home.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    [A] stately and ambitious ensemble drama.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    François Ozon’s Young & Beautiful is, in the very best sense, a film that won't add up.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    This cherishable Irish B-picture is one of those rare horror films with an unimprovable premise.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    I loved every minute of Filth, and couldn’t have stomached another second of it.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    A summer blockbuster that’s not just thrilling, but that orchestrates its thrills with such rare diligence, you want to yelp with glee.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Modest as it may look, this is boundary-pushing cinema in all the best ways, and what a thrill it is to hear those boundaries creak.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    This is mesmerically assured and tensile film-making, with two complex and plausible performances at its core, and the shin-stinging kick of a Chaucerian moral fable.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    There are visual flights of fancy here as glorious as anything Miyazaki’s studio has created, but the story is rooted in a country trudging towards its own destruction.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Guiraudie’s film is acutely brilliant on the funny, scary machinery of desire, and how easily humans can get caught up in its cogwheels.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Kim rattles you with this family’s bizarre and pitiful plight, and only then, from a place of agonised discomfort, does the laughter follow, in great whoops and roars.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    This is a heartbreaking story – how could it not be? But Frears’ film breaks your heart and then repairs it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    If you are asking an audience to listen to one man talking for an hour and a half, you had better make sure he is worth listening to, and minute-by-minute, Hardy has you spellbound.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    The slotting together of songs and plot is often done with a spark of inspiration.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    This is a simple and beautiful journey undertaken purely for its own sake, and approached in that spirit, Tracks will lead you to a place of quiet wonder.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    This is Egoyan’s best film for a very long time: like Reynolds, he needed a hit, and The Captive is a welcome return to the form of The Sweet Hereafter. Its eeriness creeps up on you and taps you on the shoulder, and when you spin around, it’s still behind you.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    The mood flits between solemn and rascally, and the pacing is measured: this is storytelling at a mosey rather than a trot.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    This is a complex, bewitching and melancholy drama, another fearlessly intelligent film from Assayas.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    This is another hugely admirable entry in the Dardenne canon: nothing all that new, perhaps, but as thoughtful, humane and superbly composed as we have, very fortunately, come to expect from them.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    [Dolan's] raised his craft, and made by far his best film yet.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    This is a beautiful, bold, intently serious film.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Hogg withholds the specifics, and lets you decode things for yourself. Her camera rarely moves, but every shot is composed with total artistry, building to a final image that’s somehow both joyful and devastating.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Metro Manila is so spellbound by its setting that it is a good hour before we discover what kind of film it is going to be. It begins as a swirling drama of survival in the Filipino capital — but then suddenly it slips off down an alleyway, only to emerge a scrupulously engineered, Christopher Nolan-ish crime thriller.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    The Lone Ranger is a grand folly that, in a sane world at least, would never have been made, although I’m really rather glad someone did.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    A large portion of Star Trek’s audience may well be satisfied by a film that amounts to not much more than an incredibly pretty and sporadically funny in-joke. But think back to the corny romance of that original mission statement, recited by William Shatner on many a rainy school night. Strange new worlds. New life. New civilisations. Boldly going where no man has gone before. That pioneer spirit? It’s gone.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    The action sequences here are armrest-gripping fun, and you only wish DeBlois and his animators had been even more confident; held their shots even longer; allowed us to enjoy the whistle of the wind and the curve of the dragons’ flight paths without hurriedly cutting away to another angle, and another, and another. When the film flies, it soars.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Transformers has ambition and attitude in its pores, and spectacle to spare. Bay shoots cars like they’re women, and people like they’re cars, and tosses around metal like it’s made from thin air. The film wasn’t meant to make you think, but it does. For better or worse, it’s cinema.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    If 300’s human touch largely came down to Butler’s roaring and screaming, it’s left entirely to Green to goose the sequel into life. Happily she obliges.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    The action sequences are executed with rhythm and punch, and our heroine swoops and swirls around like Iron Man in a sheath dress. Maleficent may be short on true enchantment, but until we find a superhero who can pull off a black silk cocktail gown in battle, she’s very welcome.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    You can’t help but feel disappointed that a film with a relatively spicy premise becomes, in the end, so risk-averse.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Sin City 2 glowers and sulks and is determined to show you the best bad time you’ve had in years. It’s neither high art nor noir, but it’s what a Sin City film should be.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Wan’s film is a sturdily built supernatural chiller, with next-to-no digital effects or gore, and it delivers its scares with a breezy lack of urgency.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    The film’s scope is limited, but as far as it goes, All Is Lost is very good indeed: a neat idea, very nimbly executed.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    About Time is itself a film less directed than quilted: it’s a feathery old patchwork under which you might snuggle at the end of a tiring week.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    The key to the film’s success, and the reason it often left me hooting with laughter, is Aniston, and her character’s struggle in vain to maintain her sweetheart persona.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    The legend loses something in the retelling, but what’s new here is mostly worth the trip.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    The scares are mostly very scary indeed, and that means the film does its job.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Only God Forgives is the spectacle of a brilliant young director spinning out in style. It’s a beautiful disaster.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    As metaphors for life go, wine has a very high yield, and Gilles Legrand’s sensitive screenplay tramples out every last drop of juice.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    In the end it amounts to not much, but in the moment I laughed a lot.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Throughout the film [Escalante's] camera tends to be lurking in the middle distance; coolly observing everything that passes through its inquisitive frame, leaving the messy business of reaction to us.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    An enjoyably silly police thriller,
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Age of Uprising falls awkwardly (but not altogether unappealingly) into the gap between art film and horse opera.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    This is a fun piece of play-acting for as long as it lasts, but it never quite feels like much more. Things may become kinky in front of the lens, but you can sense Polanski lurking behind it throughout, always ready with his safe-word. Cut!
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Unlike Walter Salles’s recent adaptation of On The Road, which embraced the Beat philosophy with a wide and credulous grin, Kill Your Darlings is inquisitive about the movement’s worth, and the genius of its characters is never assumed.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Alpha Papa’s biggest laughs explode from moments of pure inconsequence.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Tonally the film is all over the rink, but it leaves you more convinced and entertained than you’d expect.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    This is cinema as decathlon – a string of tribulations to sap your stamina and make your ligaments burn.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Joe
    Joe represents a return to the independent-spirited storytelling that characterised Green’s early career.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    The film leaves you enlightened and disillusioned, but still furious at Armstrong, who seems to have drawn the conclusion that he is now a tragic hero.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    You’re left wishing that Adler had focused more on the no-win moral tangle of the handler-informant relationship, and less of the mechanics of its execution.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Woodley and Dern breathe a ghost into the machine. Willem Dafoe has fun, albeit not too much, in a brief, vital role as a creepy writer. Most crucially, the words that survived from Green’s novel did so for a reason.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Director Camille Delamarre and Luc Besson, who co-wrote the screenplay, relocate the story to Detroit and tone down some of its (admittedly broad) social satire — although the Parkour remains centre-stage, and is mostly hair-raising.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Rather than do something freshly cinematic with Saint Laurent’s precise, elegant creations, the film is content to exhibit them.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    The second leg of Peter Jackson’s three-part adaptation of The Hobbit, by J. R. R. Tolkien, is mostly stalling for time: two or three truly great sequences tangled up in long beards and longer pit-stops.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    It feels entirely made by committee – the definition of house style, without a personal stamp in sight.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    What we get is a collection of moderately violent action set-pieces untroubled by humour or broader coherence.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    The previous X-Men film, First Class, was secure enough in its own skin to embrace its comic side. Mangold’s picture affects a pubescent snarl instead: that’s the difference between comic and daft.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    The film squanders both of its casts, reeling from one fumbled set-piece to the next. It seems to have been constructed in a stupor, and you watch in a daze of future past.