For 140 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Robbie Collin's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Foxcatcher
Lowest review score: 0 May I Kill U?
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 65 out of 140
  2. Negative: 13 out of 140
140 movie reviews
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    It’s an astonishing achievement. Linklater and his cast, who helped refine the director’s script, perfectly execute how long it takes us to become the lead characters in our own lives, and how fumblingly the role is first assumed.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    Beyond the troughful of fun tics, Spall makes Turner tenderly and totally human — the effect of which is to make his artistic talents seem even more extraordinary still.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    A science-fiction thriller of rare and diamond-hard brilliance.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    This is another hugely admirable entry in the Dardenne canon: nothing all that new, perhaps, but as thoughtful, humane and superbly composed as we have, very fortunately, come to expect from them.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    This is instant A-list Coens; enigmatic, exhilarating, irresistible.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    Miller finds grand, America-describing themes in the interactions between these three men: the extraordinary influence of inherited wealth, the hunkered-down ambition of working-class athletes, the equation of material success with honour and moral rectitude.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    In the end, I was nagged by a question posed by Polley’s sister Joanna in the film’s opening minutes. “I guess I have this instinctive reaction: who cares about our ----ing family?” The answer, of course, is Polley herself, who smilingly tells us that a story like hers can never truly be tied down, even as she screws every last piece into place.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    What gives the film its lip-smacking, chilli-pepper kick is that we are never entirely certain who is conning whom, or even if what we are watching has any truth to it at all.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    It is an extraordinary, prolonged popping-candy explosion of pleasure, sadness, anger, lust and hope.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    The film’s scope is limited, but as far as it goes, All Is Lost is very good indeed: a neat idea, very nimbly executed.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    This is a resounding return to form for Payne: there are moments that recall his earlier road movies About Schmidt and Sideways, but it has a wistful, shuffling, grizzly-bearish rhythm all of its own.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    A shimmering coup de cinema to make your heart burst, your mind swim and your soul roar.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    This is a beautiful, bold, intently serious film.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    There are visual flights of fancy here as glorious as anything Miyazaki’s studio has created, but the story is rooted in a country trudging towards its own destruction.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    So hauntingly perfect is Barnard’s film, and so skin-pricklingly alive does it make you feel to watch it, that at first you can hardly believe the sum of what you have seen.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Flies buzz, sweat trickles, negotiations continue, and you feel your breath dry up.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    For a shot of pure forward-leaping, backward-dreaming animated pleasure, pick brick.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    This Iberian spin on the Snow White legend is a curio and a wonder; a silent fairy tale woven from softest velvet.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Guiraudie’s film is acutely brilliant on the funny, scary machinery of desire, and how easily humans can get caught up in its cogwheels.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Modest as it may look, this is boundary-pushing cinema in all the best ways, and what a thrill it is to hear those boundaries creak.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    Every shot of Stray Dogs has been built with utter formal mastery; every sequence exerts an almost telepathic grip.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    If you are asking an audience to listen to one man talking for an hour and a half, you had better make sure he is worth listening to, and minute-by-minute, Hardy has you spellbound.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    The World’s End is a fitting end to the trilogy: it is by turns trashy, poignant and gut-bustingly funny, and often all three at once.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    This is a simple and beautiful journey undertaken purely for its own sake, and approached in that spirit, Tracks will lead you to a place of quiet wonder.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    It is one of the year’s very best films, a great, rumbling thunderclap of genius.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Fill the Void is a real collector’s item: a film in which the forces of religion and tradition are shown to be working together, however haltingly and imperfectly, for the good.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    This is a masterpiece of serious cinema; long, slow and grave as the grave.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    Glazer’s astonishing film takes you to a place where the everyday becomes suddenly strange, and fear and seduction become one and the same.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    The real reason to see this is Swinton and Hiddleston’s sexy, pallid double act: two old souls in hot bodies who have long tired of this Earth, but have nowhere else to make their home.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    [A] stately and ambitious ensemble drama.