For 136 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Robbie Collin's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 The Hunt
Lowest review score: 0 May I Kill U?
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 63 out of 136
  2. Negative: 12 out of 136
136 movie reviews
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Rather than do something freshly cinematic with Saint Laurent’s precise, elegant creations, the film is content to exhibit them.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Transformers has ambition and attitude in its pores, and spectacle to spare. Bay shoots cars like they’re women, and people like they’re cars, and tosses around metal like it’s made from thin air. The film wasn’t meant to make you think, but it does. For better or worse, it’s cinema.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    I’m So Excited! is vertiginously disappointing in the way only bad films from great filmmakers can be.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    Dialogue aside, the craftsmanship is unimpeachable, and Gray takes a timeless approach to pacing and camerawork: even the sunlight is sepia-tinted. But the grand themes of loyalty and ambition never catch fire, and the film’s few truly memorable moments are invariably its smallest.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    While his ambitious conceit hangs together over two hours of loudly-declaimed meta-metatheatricality, my word, does it feel like an unholy slog.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    What we get is a collection of moderately violent action set-pieces untroubled by humour or broader coherence.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    Neither clever nor stupid enough to work.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    In the end, I was nagged by a question posed by Polley’s sister Joanna in the film’s opening minutes. “I guess I have this instinctive reaction: who cares about our ----ing family?” The answer, of course, is Polley herself, who smilingly tells us that a story like hers can never truly be tied down, even as she screws every last piece into place.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    The whole thing unspools at such an unremittingly earnest pitch that it leaves you groping under your seat for a ventilator.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    The previous X-Men film, First Class, was secure enough in its own skin to embrace its comic side. Mangold’s picture affects a pubescent snarl instead: that’s the difference between comic and daft.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    Holiff assembled this memoir from his father’s papers and audio diary, although the portrait of Cash that emerges is that of a pill-popping religious nut, and there is next to no insight into his music or creative process.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    Your ass is constantly braced in readiness and hope, but it remains un-kicked.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    DisneyToon Studios have borrowed so much from Pixar here, and yet they seem to have learned almost nothing.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    Spurlock himself is nowhere to be seen, perhaps because the man in charge of this film is plainly Cowell himself, whose influence hangs over the picture like the smell of a leaky bin bag.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    Raucous but fatally confused, openly pilfering its central themes from Gilliam’s own 1985 masterpiece Brazil, but with no idea how to develop them.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    Morris gives it the old college try, but Rumsfeld is too smooth an operator to let anything slip.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    It’s less an adaptation than a recapitulation.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    Maggie Carey, the writer and director, has plenty to say about life on the cusp of womanhood, but never quite works out a way to make her points without getting her characters to recite them verbatim.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    It feels entirely made by committee – the definition of house style, without a personal stamp in sight.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    For all its innovativeness, Everyday has the rhythms and intrigue of a not-very-interesting family’s Christmas letters.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    It feels like a film that is attracted by the shape of love and pain, but is a long way from understanding the content.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    The 3D photography is shallow and muddy, although a David Attenborough voiceover helps sustain interest.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    Aharon Keshales and Navot Papushado, the two-man writer-director team, are swinging at serious targets here... But their point soon wears itself out, and what remains is schlock with airs and tired black humour.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    The second leg of Peter Jackson’s three-part adaptation of The Hobbit, by J. R. R. Tolkien, is mostly stalling for time: two or three truly great sequences tangled up in long beards and longer pit-stops.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    The sheer half-heartedness of the whole exercise, though, may still catch you unawares.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    Muppet film number eight is a resounding disappointment: it’s uneven and often grating, with only a few moments of authentic delight, and almost none of the sticky-sweet, toast-and-honey crunch of its vastly enjoyable 2011 forerunner.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    This jumbled sequel, which was also directed by Carlos Saldanha, loses most of what made the first film such an infectious entertainment.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    Anderson’s Pompeii doesn’t sweat the human stuff. His camera is mostly trained on the big picture: billowing smoke, tidal-waves, fireballs streaking through the sky. What’s happening to the people on the ground doesn’t matter, so long as we’re aware that 95 percent of them are being squashed or torched.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    The film squanders both of its casts, reeling from one fumbled set-piece to the next. It seems to have been constructed in a stupor, and you watch in a daze of future past.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    For all its visual fizz, Bonello’s film, which he co-wrote with Thomas Bidegain, tells us nothing about the designer save the usual pompous/concessive hero-worship.