Robbie Collin
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For 212 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Robbie Collin's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Duke of Burgundy
Lowest review score: 0 May I Kill U?
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 99 out of 212
  2. Negative: 18 out of 212
212 movie reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Mockingjay – Part 1 is all queue, no roller-coaster. The third of four films in the successful and admirable Hunger Games series is any number of good things: intense, stylish, topical, well-acted. But the one thing it could never be called is satisfying.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    The Lone Ranger is a grand folly that, in a sane world at least, would never have been made, although I’m really rather glad someone did.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    The third Night at the Museum film starts strongly, with its heart in the past... It’s an exciting opening, and perhaps too exciting for the film’s own good. It’s hard not to be disappointed when the plot moves back to the present and settles into the time-honoured formula of digitised creatures running riot and famous people in fancy dress doing shtick.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Age of Uprising falls awkwardly (but not altogether unappealingly) into the gap between art film and horse opera.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    The film’s secret isn’t much of a secret at all. It just remembers why Neeson was such an oddly inspired choice for a grimy revenge thriller back in 2008 and does its best to repeat the trick.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Throughout the film [Escalante's] camera tends to be lurking in the middle distance; coolly observing everything that passes through its inquisitive frame, leaving the messy business of reaction to us.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    The legend loses something in the retelling, but what’s new here is mostly worth the trip.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    An enjoyably silly police thriller,
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    The film leaves you enlightened and disillusioned, but still furious at Armstrong, who seems to have drawn the conclusion that he is now a tragic hero.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Unlike Walter Salles’s recent adaptation of On The Road, which embraced the Beat philosophy with a wide and credulous grin, Kill Your Darlings is inquisitive about the movement’s worth, and the genius of its characters is never assumed.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    This is cinema as decathlon – a string of tribulations to sap your stamina and make your ligaments burn.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Woodley and Dern breathe a ghost into the machine. Willem Dafoe has fun, albeit not too much, in a brief, vital role as a creepy writer. Most crucially, the words that survived from Green’s novel did so for a reason.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    You’re left wishing that Adler had focused more on the no-win moral tangle of the handler-informant relationship, and less of the mechanics of its execution.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    We all know Smith can deliver barbs like blow-darts, but Parker’s screenplay gives her a too-rare chance to do something more – and when she delivers a bittersweet, profound monologue towards the end of the film, it feels like you’re watching a classic Ferrari reach the end of an average speed check zone and whistle off into the distance.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    In the end it amounts to not much, but in the moment I laughed a lot.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    It’s a brawny, inventive action romp that’s as happy firing rockets at helicopters as it is contemplating the Cartesian model of mind-body dualism, which gives it a satisfying, sweet-and-sour tang of its own.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    This is a fun piece of play-acting for as long as it lasts, but it never quite feels like much more. Things may become kinky in front of the lens, but you can sense Polanski lurking behind it throughout, always ready with his safe-word. Cut!
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    [Sachs'] subtle, often quite special film shows us a shared life as a series of impositions: sometimes we’re imposed upon, and sometimes we do the imposing, and love is the net result.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    The scares are mostly very scary indeed, and that means the film does its job.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Rather than do something freshly cinematic with Saint Laurent’s precise, elegant creations, the film is content to exhibit them.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    You can’t help but feel disappointed that a film with a relatively spicy premise becomes, in the end, so risk-averse.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    The film feels like a personal project for Portman, but thankfully never a vanity one. It’s a fine piece of work – and you sense there’s better to come.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    When the film gets going, it’s hard not to be bustled along with it, thanks mostly to León de Aranoa’s talent for punchy comic dialogue – doubly impressive, given this is his first English-language picture – and the plot’s habit of thwarting your expectations as to where the most morally upstanding course of action might lead.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    The action sequences here are armrest-gripping fun, and you only wish DeBlois and his animators had been even more confident; held their shots even longer; allowed us to enjoy the whistle of the wind and the curve of the dragons’ flight paths without hurriedly cutting away to another angle, and another, and another. When the film flies, it soars.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    The action sequences are executed with rhythm and punch, and our heroine swoops and swirls around like Iron Man in a sheath dress. Maleficent may be short on true enchantment, but until we find a superhero who can pull off a black silk cocktail gown in battle, she’s very welcome.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    As metaphors for life go, wine has a very high yield, and Gilles Legrand’s sensitive screenplay tramples out every last drop of juice.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Tonally the film is all over the rink, but it leaves you more convinced and entertained than you’d expect.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    A large portion of Star Trek’s audience may well be satisfied by a film that amounts to not much more than an incredibly pretty and sporadically funny in-joke. But think back to the corny romance of that original mission statement, recited by William Shatner on many a rainy school night. Strange new worlds. New life. New civilisations. Boldly going where no man has gone before. That pioneer spirit? It’s gone.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    When it finally gets going, it becomes gloweringly compelling, shored up by its strong supporting players (Paddy Considine, Vincent Cassel and Charles Dance also pop up), handsome photography and sheer, clanking momentum.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    This script has not exactly been laboured over into the wee hours, and an audience used to Disney and Pixar will rightly expect better than this, whether they’re under 10 or not.

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