Robbie Collin
Select another critic »
For 142 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Robbie Collin's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Berberian Sound Studio
Lowest review score: 0 May I Kill U?
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 66 out of 142
  2. Negative: 13 out of 142
142 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    Morris gives it the old college try, but Rumsfeld is too smooth an operator to let anything slip.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    It’s less an adaptation than a recapitulation.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    Like one of its animated 3D asides, the film jumps out at you, twiddles around and then folds itself away into nowhere. It’s all pop-up, no book.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    Rather than embracing the jangling song-and-dance numbers that made the live version box-office catnip, Eastwood sheepishly tidies them into the background, treating the project instead like a standard music-industry biopic.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    For all its innovativeness, Everyday has the rhythms and intrigue of a not-very-interesting family’s Christmas letters.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    Aharon Keshales and Navot Papushado, the two-man writer-director team, are swinging at serious targets here... But their point soon wears itself out, and what remains is schlock with airs and tired black humour.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    For all its visual fizz, Bonello’s film, which he co-wrote with Thomas Bidegain, tells us nothing about the designer save the usual pompous/concessive hero-worship.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    This is exasperatingly thin stuff from Loach and Laverty, who have in the past built far more textured narratives, peopled by far richer characters, even while maintaining the fierce, politicised charge they aim for here.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 20 Robbie Collin
    After watching Peter Farrelly’s Movie 43, I was immediately overcome with a sudden rush of emotion: not amusement, anger or even mild irritation, but a profound and faintly tragic sense of pity.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 20 Robbie Collin
    So, what happens in Grown Ups 2? Almost absolutely nothing.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 20 Robbie Collin
    The plot is an incomprehensible tangle of dead ends and recaps.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 20 Robbie Collin
    The film’s glib disregard for collateral murder runs to farcical extremes.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 20 Robbie Collin
    You can sense what Dahan’s aiming at: by introducing the spectre of Hitch early on, he lays out Grace’s existence as a kind of lived-in Hitchcock thriller... But the acting is so heightened, and the script so thoroughly awful, that Dahan’s idea – his big and seemingly only one – can’t begin to stick.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 20 Robbie Collin
    Tom Gormican, the writer and director, mostly uses overlapping dialogue in place of actual jokes, although occasionally he stretches to toilet humour.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 20 Robbie Collin
    Oswald’s brother Robert, played by James Badge Dale, is the film’s only rational human being, and Dale makes you wish Landesman had written the entire film from his angle.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 20 Robbie Collin
    The whole thing is so roaringly absurd, and delivered with such hands-clasped sincerity, that the only rational response is to laugh the house down.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 20 Robbie Collin
    Cuban Fury belongs to an older, unfunnier time. Please let’s not go back.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 20 Robbie Collin
    It is three parts The Mighty Boosh to two parts The Goon Show, which, when mixed with the quite astonishing lack of wit and finesse seen here, makes for pure cinematic strychnine.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 20 Robbie Collin
    The result is cinema you don’t watch so much as absent-mindedly scroll through, wondering when an idea or an image worth clicking on will finally show up.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 20 Robbie Collin
    What distinguishes the film from last year’s backpacking adventure, The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, apart from its lobotomised worldview and charred, corroded soul, are Hector’s philosophical musings – “people who are afraid of death are afraid of life,” is one – that pop up on screen in a handwritten font whenever a lesson has been learnt.
    • 7 Metascore
    • 0 Robbie Collin
    There may well be a worse film released this year than this unwatchable British black comedy, although it sets a terrifyingly low benchmark.