Robbie Collin

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For 269 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Robbie Collin's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Yakuza Apocalypse
Lowest review score: 0 May I Kill U?
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 19 out of 269
269 movie reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    This is bewitchingly smart science fiction of a type that’s all too rare. Its intelligence is anything but artificial.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    This is another hugely admirable entry in the Dardenne canon: nothing all that new, perhaps, but as thoughtful, humane and superbly composed as we have, very fortunately, come to expect from them.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    A melding of old and new modes of animation, in which the attentive artistry of the past coexists with the hyper-detailed, computer-generated present.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    I loved every minute of Filth, and couldn’t have stomached another second of it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    It’s a critic’s instinct to auto-praise any blockbuster that tries to do something different, but Catching Fire is so committed to carrying on the fine work started by its predecessor that the applause flows utterly naturally.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    What we’ve seen since the beginnings of the Marvel serial in 2008 is an ongoing stretching: bigger casts, grander set-pieces and more intricate interplay between characters, with no clear end in sight. Ant-Man scuttles off in the other direction. Brisk humour, keenly felt dramatic stakes, and invention over scale. You know: small pleasures.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Wright’s inkily beautiful, imaginatively structured picture - drama bleeds into newsreel and archive footage - is another excellent new film about the strange ways British landscapes (and here, seascapes) work on British minds.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    This cherishable Irish B-picture is one of those rare horror films with an unimprovable premise.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    This is a complex, bewitching and melancholy drama, another fearlessly intelligent film from Assayas.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Its sombre sincerity and hypnotic, treasure-box beauty make Crimson Peak feel like a film out of time – but Del Toro, his cast and his crew carry it off without a single postmodern prod or smirk. The film wears its heart on its sleeve, along with its soul and most of its intestines.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Coppola’s uproarious and bitingly timely film feels every inch a necessary artwork.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    The mood flits between solemn and rascally, and the pacing is measured: this is storytelling at a mosey rather than a trot.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    The World’s End is a fitting end to the trilogy: it is by turns trashy, poignant and gut-bustingly funny, and often all three at once.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    What gives the film its lip-smacking, chilli-pepper kick is that we are never entirely certain who is conning whom, or even if what we are watching has any truth to it at all.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    It’s a chewy watch, heavy on the socio-political carbs, and its method can be a little exhausting. But its determination to do right by its subject – and Gitai’s own country too – is soberly compelling.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Alpha Papa’s biggest laughs explode from moments of pure inconsequence.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    There are lightning-flashes of pure, ornamental brilliance throughout Paolo Sorrentino’s Youth, although there’s not much happening on the landscape they illuminate.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    While there’s nothing here to remotely trouble young minds, there’s nothing much to stick in them either. For the most part, the film just seems to waft along, and though Charlie Brown's life is low-key by nature, the stories are mostly flimsily low-impact.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Sisters is entertaining as far as it goes, but it only occasionally feels like it’s going far enough.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    The film unquestionably dices with slightness. But you don’t leave the cinema feeling that something was missing, and Tomlin, who appears in every scene, constructs a persuasive and highly watchable character.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Eastwood doesn’t care about the legend. Instead, he shows us Kyle much as he saw his targets: with that strange combination of extreme intimacy and extreme remove that a long-range sight confers.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Wan’s film is a sturdily built supernatural chiller, with next-to-no digital effects or gore, and it delivers its scares with a breezy lack of urgency.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    As supposedly taboo-smashing comedy, it’s never on full thrust, settling more for tentative gags with underwear firmly in place.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Joe
    Joe represents a return to the independent-spirited storytelling that characterised Green’s early career.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    You see San Francisco and Los Angeles falling apart very loudly and dangerously, and in great computer-generated detail. But there’s nothing memorable or beautiful about the carnage; no specific moments to replay in your head once the film is over.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    There’s no question The Rewrite is underpinned by the same story mechanisms it draws attention to... But there are moments here when sunlight breaks through the shtick.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    The film moves like a pyjama case full of angry weasels, and finds ingenious ways to cram every scene with just one more loopy, disposable gag or slapstick thwack. It may not be the year’s best animated film, but it’s almost certainly the most.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    About Time is itself a film less directed than quilted: it’s a feathery old patchwork under which you might snuggle at the end of a tiring week.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    I’ve always enjoyed the idea of the Fast & Furious films more than their execution, but this feels like the series’ strongest, even though some of its action sequences are so muddled they can barely walk straight.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Only God Forgives is the spectacle of a brilliant young director spinning out in style. It’s a beautiful disaster.

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