For 525 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 39% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Robert Lloyd's Scores

Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 The Office (UK): Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 I Wanna Marry Harry: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 25 out of 525
525 tv reviews
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Robert Lloyd
    As did the six previous episodes, the new installments generate a tension so awful, from circumstances so awfully lifelike, that you have to watch at times from behind laced fingers, with teeth clenched and the remote control close at hand.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Robert Lloyd
    It integrates the boredom, self-delusion, dashed hopes and struggle for power into something bigger, and potentially better, and functions not only as a continuation of the story but a convincing conclusion.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Robert Lloyd
    Given the extravagances of the plot and the characters, that it feels plausibly seated in the real world is a testament to everyone involved in its production. But it is especially due to the actors.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Robert Lloyd
    To my mind, it's the best series of the fall, and with the tonally similar "Top of the Lake," possibly of the year.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Robert Lloyd
    True Detective runs slow and steady without ever seeming to drag. Even minor characters get room to breathe, and seem independently alive; the briefest scenes seem to imply life beyond the frame.... The dance [Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson] do together here is work of a very high order, and all the reason you need to watch.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Robert Lloyd
    Each [episode] stands on its own as a TV art film, an independent work of short fiction.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    For all its willful outrageousness, Arrested Development is sort of gripping -- a continuing story that one actually wants to see continue, which is more than can be said of most of the new dramas the season produced. [31 Oct 2003, p.E1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    At once more modest and more ambitious than its predecessor; more focused on detail and yet more expansive. It is also excruciatingly funny, with an emphasis on excruciating.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    The domestic version... is every bit as good as the original.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    In its emphasis on character over plot it reminds me of movies from the pre-Spielberg '70s, and is in so many ways what I want from television that I feel almost like phoning each of you personally to deliver the news.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    What is remarkable about "Life Support" is how it avoids every pitfall of the standard issue-based TV film and, indeed, of most TV films, period.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    It is big, beautiful, beautifully acted and romantic, its passions expressed with that particular British reserve that serves only to make them burn brighter.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    Enlightened is to my mind the most interesting and ambitious series of the fall season.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    This may be the better work [than "No Direction Home"], for its depth of feeling and its relatively more forthcoming and knowable subject.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    Notwithstanding a certain stylistic chilliness and my sense of it having been pitched on the back of "Inception," it promised to be one of the year's best and most interesting new series. Having seen four episodes now, I'd say the promise has been largely kept.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    The performances are so wonderful it feels wrong to single any out. But Whishaw finds great power in stillness; Hiddleston fits himself admirably to his character's stages and turns of mind, resolving his coldness with his warmth, his cruelty with his generosity. And there is Beale's Falstaff--marvelously poignant, a scoundrel-hero, getting everything wrong. His sorrow at losing the transformed Hal is as tragic a moment as any here, his fall no less thunderous than Richard's.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    By rooting Top of the Lake in the real, Campion gives her more fanciful inspirations legs, and the mystery--which is, needless to say, not merely or even mostly the mystery of a missing girl--room to breathe. I have no idea where any of it's headed. But I am going along.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    As much as I love what Lewis and Patinkin—as well as Baccarin and Saylor—do here, Danes is what makes Homeland remarkable.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    "Curb" is a comedy of hostility, resentment, paranoia and obsessiveness. There are no feel-good moments, no life-brightening epiphanies, nothing, in fact, even vaguely resembling a resolution; things get as bad as you feared, and then the credits roll. [3 Jan 2004]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The already evident lesson is that a moldy premise need not stand in the way of a good time. [22 Sept 2003, p.E1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The real miracle here is how deftly the show avoids the soggy cliches of redemption so many of its forerunners have embraced. [26 Sept 2003, p.E1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    A continually surprising thriller that maintains an air of imminent danger through its five or so hours (in six episodes), State of Play is a grander, more romantic creation [than Prime Suspect 6].
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    I haven't seen ancient ordinary life so well represented since "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum," and I am not being funny.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    "Rome" is smart, dirty fun.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    "Surface" is steeped in Spielberg, and is better Spielberg than Spielberg has managed in quite some time.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    All in all, it's a rich work, full of detail and small moments, and grounded in reality by an utterly believable supporting cast partly drawn from the school where the series was shot.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    While this sort of thing has been done before -- "Curb Your Enthusiasm" on the high end of Hollywood self-referentiality, and the nasty, brutish and short-lived "Fat Actress" with Kirstie Alley on the low -- it has been done here exceedingly well.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    A considerably above-average Generation Y sitcom that manages to be both sharp and sentimental, like "Seinfeld" with feeling.
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It takes no time at all for the new team to establish its authority; the new "Who" feels at once traditional and fresh, and completely right.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    A "heightened reality" show, one might call it, but one which makes its subject palpable and which, because it is made with care, lets you care too. It's the more artful portrait, paradoxically, that paints the truer picture.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    A dark and splendid "Dr. Who" spinoff with overtones of "Men in Black" and "Buffy the Vampire Slayer."
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's a conclusion that seemed to me both contrived and honest, if that makes any sense, and it left me disturbed, though not, as Doctor Who often has, a sobbing wreck.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Cop show, fantasy, mystery, comedy, romance, puzzle -- there are a lot of ways to approach "Life on Mars," which begins its second and final season tonight on BBC America, and they all pay off.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    That the funniest straight-ahead sitcom of the American fall television season is a 2-year-old British import airing on a basic-cable network is because of a few things: a dearth of new American sitcoms, the availability of road-tested foreign product, and the ongoing expansion of the vast tracts of basic cable into the kind of programming that has traditionally defined broadcast television.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Hotel Babylon is willfully bright and sexy--like the Parker's décor, it updates a '70s sensibility--but also has a nice eye for detail, good minor characters and well-flowing dialogue.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's a work whose immense vitality and a persuasive naturalism overcome its occasional paroxysms of style or hammered-home points.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's smart without either condescending to or patronizing the viewer.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    One of the season's best new shows.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    A smart, amiable, colorful new cartoon series.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's a little movie that feels big, without being self-consciously cinematic.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The strength of the series lies not in the whodunit elements--it isn't hard to work out who's behind it, even if it isn't immediately apparent why--but in its eye for local details and small human gestures.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Samantha Who? is as perfectly realized a comedy as the fall has to offer.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It is all very beautiful.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    That the two men are in their 30s makes their perseverance more poignant--to somewhat overstate the case--and that they have no money places them in a long and honorable line of comedians who cannot put two cents together to buy a glass of seltzer.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The pilot is an especially persuasive hour of action-adventure, but subsequent lower-budget episodes preserve the esprit and suspense.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The show is consistently clever and lively, well played and directed, its corners filled with nice throwaway lines and small visual jokes.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Tyler Labine makes a most excellent wacky bearded sidekick, and Rick Gonzalez and Valarie Rae Miller round out the Scooby Gang. Auteur of slackerdom Kevin Smith ("Clerks") directed the pilot, which maintains a nice fairy tale tone even as it stresses the banality of the infernal.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The dialogue is always to the point, yet it gives even the bit players enough room to create something memorable.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    There is little in the way of "action"--it is possibly the slowest, most deliberative show on television, which is one of the things that makes it so lovely and mysterious.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    There are no heroes or villains here, only people working out or being carried toward their individual destinies. And in who we root for and in what we root for them to choose, we also define ourselves.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's very good, although as sad and disturbing as the mustache implies.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The show moves fast without seeming to rush you. The timing, on the part of actors and editors alike, is excellent--both Bornheimer and Smith are good physical comedians--so that even while you can set your watch by the Next Bad Thing About to Happen, tension is created, suspense maintained.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    As directed by Peter Berg, this is smart, handsome TV, a witty, measured mix of sci-fi, soap and satire that offers new twists on old tropes.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The contest consists of family members answering questions about one another to win money and prizes, which is straightforward enough and entertaining on its own. But what makes it work so well, I am surprised to say, is the Big Gimmick: the fact that the show is staged on the contestants' front lawn.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Sweet, lyrical and a little cracked, it's worth seeking out.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    I'll say now, before I get down to picking its nits--it has a few, and most might be predicted from the Spielberg oeuvre--that it's a splendid production, absolutely worth watching in its 10-hour entirety.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Costello (who has subbed for David Letterman) makes a fine host--a bit reverential at times, but never as pious as, say, James Lipton can become over at the similarly configured "Inside the Actors Studio."
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Despite its equivocal title, Almost the Truth beats any Python documentary yet made for comprehensiveness and depth.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It is a bit like Martin Scorsese's "After Hours," filtered through the sensibility of a Whit Stillman and sprinkled with "Flight of the Conchords"--and yet it feels new, because it is so completely itself, consistently itself, a mix of romance, adventure and stoner comedy (there is a lot of pot about) that never abandons the world the rest of us can recognize.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Project Runway is a hard act to follow. Still, if you like watching people make (sometimes) beautiful clothes from nothing in no time--the first challenge is to make a little black dress from a little black T-shirt--The Fashion Show has that too.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Even with its problems--we'll get to those presently--it's one of the best shows of the fall season.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Creator Ian Edelman keeps his characters on the right side of caricature and avoids the kind of melodramatic confrontations their relations might typically suggest.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It is a smart, affable, mostly unpredictable ensemble comedy that reminds us that in the 500-channel universe, fine things can happen in unlikely places, as long as you are clever about budget, commit to a sensible number of episodes--in this case 10--write well and cast right, and that what matters ultimately to heaven is not the eminence of the venue but the quality of the work.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It is cinematic in the sense that nothing in it looks quite real. But it works: This is not the London known as jolly and old, but the new chilly city of glass, a place of missed connections, of aliens and alienation. And the smart dialogue and warm performances--even Holmes has a discernible beating heart, or perhaps two--keep ice from forming on the production.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The current series has fresh air to breathe and new names to drop--Chin Chin, Caltech, Hillcrest, the Edison--and apparently plans to make a meal out of Hollywood. But it hits the traditional notes square on, moving fast in brief scenes and bursts of exposition, and splitting the difference between melodrama and naturalism.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's not the greatest thing since sliced bread but rather a well-made sort of sliced bread, a thing you have had before but prepared with quality ingredients by bakers who know their business.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Terriers is a wonderfully well-conceived, well-made and well-played series about a pair of soft-boiled downmarket private detectives in over their heads in San Diego.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Outsourced seems to me the most deftly realized sitcom of the new season. It is no closer to reality than any of its Thursday night neighbors ( Ken Kwapis, of "The Office" and other good things, developed it and directed the pilot), but it has a top-flight cast, characters who show you who they are rather than telling you, smart writing, sure rhythms and a cheerful attitude.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Apart from a surfeit of split screen effects and some overbearing soundtrack selections, I have no quarrel with this series at all, and wore a lump in my throat through much of it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The series is a better-heeled, better-paced and, within the bounds of its own Portland-ish modesty, a more ambitious extension of the occasional videos that Armisen and Portland resident Brownstein have posted online over the past few years under the name ThunderAnt.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    This air of familiarity notwithstanding, the pilot is splendidly rendered; effective in the expected ways in a way that makes you forget you expected them.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Garbus, director of the Oscar-nominated, Emmy-winning "The Farm: Angola, USA," fills in many of the blanks--to an impressive extent, given the obsessively guarded privacy of her subject--in a film that is both meditative and exciting, like the game it concerns, and mercilessly penetrating even as it reserves judgment on a man whose outrageousness practically demands it.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Only Julianna Margulies on "The Good Wife" is carrying a comparable load, and though Roughness is a more fanciful construction than that CBS show, with more obvious emotional victories, it feels just as honest. It worked on me as intended.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    By not belaboring the point--Ryan is not crazy, there is nothing supernatural afoot--the show stays fresh, the gimmick fades. The humor is frequently scatological or sexual, but a mitigating sweetness enfolds it all.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    What makes it so engaging is not that the series finds anything new to twist, but that it works so well with and within the strictures of the well-thumbed genres it combines in equal parts: spy thriller, murder mystery, backstage drama, triangular romance.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The glamour in Pan Am may indeed be manufactured--doubly manufactured, given the re-created places and planes--but it's not empty: The show says, yes, this is as good as it looks, and it looks very good
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The dialogue has a nice snap, the jokes come from just to the left of where you expect them to, and the players are all first-rate.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The show can be, in odd passing moments, unexpectedly, almost nervily touching.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The Fades works.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It works because it's less about who we were then--it's a fantasy of who we were then, really--than about who we are now.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The artfully composed images are both crystal clear and cinematically creamy.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Well made and never boring--the director is Julian Jarrold ("Becoming Jane")--Appropriate Adult is a first-class example of what British filmmakers do well when they are not trying to look like American filmmakers.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It is a suitably complicated and pictorially engaging work of period suburban mystery, with a large cast of characters
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    [The taped linking] bits feel a little forced compared to the sketches, which are consistently smart and smartly acted and flow easily from ordinary premises to weird conclusions.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Even if you don't particularly feel for Selina--you don't root for her, particularly, or against her--there is continual pleasure in watching the actress make her go.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Every performance here is good--the young actors are remarkable--and though the script sometimes goes just where you would expect it to, the characters seem authentically unpredictable.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    [Political Animals is] a high-class, relatively naturalistic, behind-closed-doors soap opera that plays in fairly obvious yet also fairly affecting ways with the space between public face and private pain and is made highly watchable by an excellent cast that finds the human among the hokum.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    As before there is a nice balance between social drama and personal business, the tragic and the comic, exaggeration and authenticity.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    I like this a lot.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    This year, by contrast [to last year], the drama flows more naturally; it cuts closer to home, and nearer the bone, allowing Smith and McGovern, particularly, deeper material than has previously been their portion
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Though it has the pokey pace and flat affect of his other films--for Burns, history is elegy--it is also one of his best works: more tightly focused than usual in time and place, with a clear shape, dramatic arcs and a conclusion that is at once cautionary and moving, topical and timeless.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The show improves as it gathers context, and before long you stop thinking about what makes this Arrested Development different from all other Arrested Developments.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The first episode took a little while to seem real, but, as Holder would say, I was feeling it before long. Like Linden, I was drawn back in.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    More a sketch than a thorough retelling--though still recommended as such--and as balanced as you can be about the scandal given the facts, the film begins at the end, or just before it, with the remarkable, once much-bootlegged footage of Nixon preparing to resign.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    A smart and highly suspenseful miniseries.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's an accomplished piece of work. And it gains heft from a number of impressive cameos.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    In the wonderful Family Tree, hangdog Chris O'Dowd, finding his life stalled after losing a girlfriend and a job in short order, goes in search of his roots and relatives.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The writing rings true as often as not, and the actors do not wave their arms or raise their voices unduly; they play to the human moments between the rim shots.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    A few caricatures stick out among the characters, but the subtler conceptions, on the page and in performance, win out.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Rick Beyer's fascinating, detailed and oddly delightful account of the World War II military camouflage artists whose job was not to hide men and materiel but to create battalions where none actually existed, drawing German eyes and ears to the wrong place.

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