For 740 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Robert Lloyd's Scores

Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Show Me a Hero
Lowest review score: 0 I Wanna Marry Harry: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 30 out of 740
740 tv reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    A humane, human comedy, fun and funny.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The writing rings true as often as not, and the actors do not wave their arms or raise their voices unduly; they play to the human moments between the rim shots.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    By loading his film with musicians and producers and songwriters who can take a song down to its components--some of whom were behind the scenes, some of whom were then just kids buying the records--Lee keeps his celebration smart and not soppy.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Some will find it offensive, immoral, irresponsible--a highly defensible position. It's also very funny, a thing of twisted genius and, for the next eight weeks possibly the most original comedy on television.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's very good, although as sad and disturbing as the mustache implies.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Terriers is a wonderfully well-conceived, well-made and well-played series about a pair of soft-boiled downmarket private detectives in over their heads in San Diego.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    For all the switchback plotting, the sudden revelations that bring some earlier plot or plotline to naught, the show never feels too obviously manipulative or out of control. This is in part because of the restrained way it's shot and acted.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It clips along in leaps and bounds, and the speed at which events occur can make them seem dramatically obvious, more declared than developed. Much of the time you don't feel the characters' pain so much as take it as read. But the key moments of spiritual revelation are handled well and the production gains power in the home stretch, just where you want power gained.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Though firmly in the Lucas tradition, this is also a Disney cartoon, for a Disney crowd and a Disney corporation--watching, you can almost feel the plastic and the plush--and whatever the characters are up to, however cute or sentimental the business, it is smartly designed and cinematically staged, and not hard to enjoy.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    [Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski] and their fellow writers do a good job getting the information out, (mostly) without making the dialogue too obviously expository; it happens at times, but it almost can't be helped. As producer and sometimes director, Murphy keeps the production pretty level-headed-- not documentary naturalism, exactly, but close enough for respect.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The series' inextricable mix of the personal and the political makes for the best of both worlds in the end, because Simien is sweet with his characters, who are, finally, sweet with one another. Principles matter here, but people matter more.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Rick Beyer's fascinating, detailed and oddly delightful account of the World War II military camouflage artists whose job was not to hide men and materiel but to create battalions where none actually existed, drawing German eyes and ears to the wrong place.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It’s a professionalized version of Rae's homely original that maintains her voice while sharpening everything that surrounds and supports it.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's not the greatest thing since sliced bread but rather a well-made sort of sliced bread, a thing you have had before but prepared with quality ingredients by bakers who know their business.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Berlin Station is a tense, terse thriller--good-looking but never fussy, balancing character and plot in satisfying proportions, a new suit cut to classic lines.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    That the two men are in their 30s makes their perseverance more poignant--to somewhat overstate the case--and that they have no money places them in a long and honorable line of comedians who cannot put two cents together to buy a glass of seltzer.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It does not go deep. And yet in its moments, Graves can be quite persuasive, even moving. (It can be corny too, but corn can work.) Growling and grumbling like a spokesperson for phlegm as he takes Graves from childishness to youthfulness, Nolte finds everything touching in his character, and makes you feel it too.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The leads are all marvelous, with a complementary elemental division of attitudes: Kemper, air; Burrell, fire; Kane, earth; and Krakowski, water, as I reckon it. They rise to the occasion and make it an event.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The first episode took a little while to seem real, but, as Holder would say, I was feeling it before long. Like Linden, I was drawn back in.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It is funny and disturbing in exactly the manner and proportions one would expect from his earlier works.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Whatever its faults, The Sinner does present a puzzle; it has a certain gravitational pull. One wants to see it through, or at least find the point where one no longer wishes to. And Biel is really very good.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    McKenzie's best moments are all spent in his [new partner Harvey Bullock's (Donal Logue)] company. Bullock loosens him up even as Bullock puts him off, signaling that their uneasy partnership will become an easier one. He performs a similar service to the whole production, bringing it down to earth, keeping it from becoming too much of a comic-book gizmo with its wash of rain grays and rot rusts and spittoon bronzes and Frank Miller lighting effects.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    "I'm finally getting to do the exact kind of show that I've always wanted to do.... What that show is, I have no idea." An unkind commentator might be tempted to second that thought, given "Chelsea's" first-night, new-colt wobbles, but it's pointless to be too hard on any talk show on its premiere, even when the host has a long track record. ... Overall, it was an appealing debut.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The Mist comes with a serious lack of comic relief--characters make cracks, but they are on the whole more bitter than funny. Still, it is a well-made, if somewhat dour, creep show that delivers the shocks and awfulness you would be watching for in the first place and manages some decent dialogue in between.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Yet with reservations, and a little bit of squinting while the odd anomaly goes by--and having seen only the first two episodes, written and directed by Darabont himself--I would recommend it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Branagh plays up the dark side of this town-in-the-country pastoral--partly by turning exposition into sometimes violent action, partly by trimming the banter--to deepen the romance. (He likes a pratfall, though.) Mostly it works.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Some will derive pleasure merely from vetting the authenticity of the clothes and materiel, the accuracy of the action, the appropriateness of the locations. There are many old trains to admire, puffing prettily along mountain riverbeds.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    I rather liked it, though for its form possibly more than for its content. (Note: Subsequent episodes improve on the pilot.)
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The actors do their best to put life into these scenes, but they are so brief and expository, given how much territory there is to cover, that they feel mostly manufactured. Still, action is action--and this action is well staged--and it's reliably compelling to watch the good guys, with their night-vision goggles, special guns and ninja tread, going after the bad.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Though satirical points are made--about gender roles and race, about progress, the lack of progress and the wrong kind of progress--the humor overall is goofy (and gooey), a kind of Mel Brooks romp for the 20-teens, minor but sweet.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Gunn is best when showing us what he knows, reacting critically to the thing in front of him rather than speaking lines meant to jog the narrative or jack up the drama.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It is, basically, good-looking fun, and if I say that much of this might have been written by a 12-year-old, you must understand that I mean that as a good thing.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Well-crafted and a little--sometimes more than a little--unpleasant.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    When Stevenson trawls a nightclub looking for a victim, it feels anything but fresh, and it’s suspenseful in the most mechanical way. It's the "Dawson's Creek" Williamson who’s the more valuable here; the romance and the comedy are what keep the series buoyant.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It’s an intelligent, if sometimes taxing or manipulative show, well played, often funny, here and there lovely; it improves as it goes along, letting us get to like characters who can first seem a little hateful.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    What matters is the reliable humor of modern characters trying to pass for old-fashioned ones, and the old-fashioned ones acting modern.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    There are times when it rubbed me a little the wrong way, but I suspect that might be intentional, part of the longer game. Phil is a hero who needs work. Forte projects an innate normality, an averageness and equanimity, that keeps his characters companionable, even at their most extravagant, astringent or abnormal.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    If the characters are not particularly original, neither do they come off as artificial. The dialogue is 75% banter, but it is crisp and tart, and the actors make even the ripostes you can predict sound spontaneous.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Once you accept that you are in for a certain kind of joke repeated over and over again — or three kinds of jokes, if you include those regarding the deterioration of mind and body and those about kids these days — and settle in to the show's rhythms, you find yourself, paradoxically, laughing more easily.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Despite its troublesome subject, the series succeeds, moderately, in letting you know that it knows that Bond, as his creator conceived him, is a relic, and that Fleming's pulp-novel aspirations are worth skewering.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Although it looks at first to be a sports-world "Entourage," a horrifying thought, it proceeds to reach for something better.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The flavor is high-style retro-modern, high-style B-picture.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Entertaining. ... While the musical numbers are all beautifully realized--everything seems to be performed live--the miniseries is more drama than musical; and as a drama it’s more a sampler of Early Scenes from Great Lives than a deep or driven narrative.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The show is exceptionally well made from top to bottom and pulls you in and pulls you along, owing not least to a host of terrific performances.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It was an exuberant, technically audacious staging.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Created by Bill Dubuque and Mark Williams (both of whom worked on “The Accountant”), Ozark does most things right. Not every plot point feels completely plausible, but the show looks good and plays well; the writing is crisp and not too colorful; the performances are unforced and believable.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    After a relatively overstated first episode (relative to what follows, that is, not to cartoons as a whole), it settles down into a gentler, more delicate, behind-the-beat groove.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Viewers sad about the end of "Happy Town" and looking for another creepy municipal drama filmed in Canada may find this a port in the storm, though it is more cheaply appointed and less spectacularly cast. Still, it would be pointless to attack the show for not achieving things that are beyond its ambitions.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Unlike many series--especially cable series--and despite the propensity of some family members to take undue advantage of Cam's new good fortune, the show is not broadly cynical about people or institutions, which makes it easy to like, despite its sometimes wobbly tone and occasional clumsy construction.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It's perhaps appropriate to the subject matter that the show's main appeal is sensual rather than cerebral, grounded in a host of superb performances.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The series feels familiar but also fresh; predictable but not without character.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It is nothing new, but it is well assembled and expertly played.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    What makes the show worth watching are some old-fashioned character relationships; no single performance tears up the place, but together they make something interesting.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Trial & Error is solid and funny, impressively cast and in no significant sense groundbreaking.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Though constructed from off-the-rack tropes and predictable dialogue, the show also keeps moving forward, causing its characters enough trouble that you feel compelled to stick around at least to see how they get out of it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    I'm not wholly convinced by the American Life on Mars.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Important Things is inconsistent--the sketches are on the whole less funny than the stand-up, but they have their moments, and the show is on the whole worthwhile.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Breaking Bad is as good as a show on this subject could possibly get, but the subject has its drawbacks. I like it, I admire it, but I can't say I enjoy it.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The production itself is sunny and conducive to a good mood. Coughlan wears well, as does Jason Priestley in the role of the fiancé she puts on hold.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    There is little in the way of humor. What relief there is comes from supporting characters, like Chance's office manager, Lucy (Greta Lee), who let in a little fresh air from the normal world offstage. The performances are enjoyable.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The show fails only when it wants to make you feel something warm about their mission, rather than just letting you enjoy the icy suspense and snappy dialogue.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It’s a sketch, essentially, effectively blown out to 40 minutes--not too short, not too long. Apart from the generally good jokes and the amusing imitations of period style, what makes Tour de Pharmacy good company is the overarching sense of play. That describes a lot of modern comedy, for better or worse, the sense that the players are on board primarily for the good time and camaraderie as much as for the material or the paycheck. It’s a feeling the modesty of this production only enhances.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Timeless is a mostly straight-faced, frequently corny, occasionally high-minded adventure thriller--pulp that stops every once in a while to reflect on the dark marks of American history or consider its characters' deeper feelings and predicaments. Yet it works best when it remembers that there’s something inherently nutty in the whole business, when it does not deny its inner “Back to the Future.”
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Enlightening without feeling quite essential, the sort of PBS package that seems at times designed to warm the hearts and loosen the purse strings of viewers of a certain age and income.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    He is kind of irritating.... but Passmore largely pulls it off, in part by making the character a bit daffy; he just can't help himself. And the producers surround him with jerks and dweebs and men less handsome or clever than himself to ensure that he's the person with whom we identify and whose opinions we share; the plot conveniently supports his genius.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It's at its funniest when it moves out of the studio and into the world, where Triumph does his rude-dog-on-the-street act, like a canine Billy Eichner channeling what is not yet the ghost of Don Rickles. There is something actually audacious about these bits but also genuinely fun; you're let in on the game.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    While the narrative never quite coheres into a compelling whole, there are enough independently arresting, unexpectedly moving moments to carry you through, hopping from one to the next like stones in a river, on the way to a strenuously tidy conclusion.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    If anything is liable to make "Smith" above the well-made caper show it already is, it's what might be done with the relationship between Liotta and Madsen.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The 2003 edition has the edge on the 1942 in terms of raw excitement.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The situations are stock--John Hughes wrote this playbook pretty thoroughly--and the dialogue does not exactly crackle. But it is all well-staged and believably played and at times it becomes quite lyrical and, even, moving.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Its sometimes distracting and oppressive aspirations aside, Low Winter Sun does nevertheless strike me as promising, solid at its core, powered by plausible cross-purposes. Strong and James are excellent.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Rush Hour, the Jackie Chan-Chris Tucker big-screen martial-arts action-comedy franchise, has now given birth to a noisy and likable TV series.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    While the broad strokes tend to remind you that you're watching a fiction, the finer details are well done - the bits and pieces are satisfying, even as you note the rivets and seams that join them.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    There are well-written and well-mounted scenes and some good performances. It is not without suspense. But even at four hours, House of Saddam feels incomplete and scattered--a lessened, not a heightened reality.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The leads each fare better when her character is a little off base--Fonda's when she defrosts a little, Tomlin's when she toughens up--and the show is more fun when they're in a mood to cooperate than when they're trading barbs.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It chokes a bit on its own whimsicality. But it stays on its feet.

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