For 747 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Robert Lloyd's Scores

Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Louie: Season 4
Lowest review score: 0 I Wanna Marry Harry: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 30 out of 747
747 tv reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It is a bit like Martin Scorsese's "After Hours," filtered through the sensibility of a Whit Stillman and sprinkled with "Flight of the Conchords"--and yet it feels new, because it is so completely itself, consistently itself, a mix of romance, adventure and stoner comedy (there is a lot of pot about) that never abandons the world the rest of us can recognize.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's very good, although as sad and disturbing as the mustache implies.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Like the women in it, the show is solid and professional and holds together well.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Though it does not seem to be entirely scripted, it is (as opposed to the rambling podcast) highly organized and includes invented guests alongside those appearing as not necessarily reliable versions of themselves.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    Six of 10 episodes were made available for review; and over their course the truth-telling gets a little repetitious, a little annoying, a little dull; there are only so many bandages you can rip off to reveal other bandages you can rip off to get down to the skin you can peel back to get down to the bone.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    As semi-ironic, dark and comic exercises in genre go, it is not as clever or carefully shaped as "Ash vs. Evil Dead." But it is miles ahead of "Sharknado" (which also lives on Syfy) and on the whole well-produced and directed, though its effectiveness varies from episode to episode and even from sequence to sequence.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The show can be, in odd passing moments, unexpectedly, almost nervily touching.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It is so well-assembled and well-played that its contrivances and clichés play like something reasonably close to life.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's very funny, beautifully played, sometimes touching and, though its premise is familiar--rich family loses money--quite its own animal.
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Standard sitcom issue--yet they feel convincingly bound to each other from the start.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    He is kind of irritating.... but Passmore largely pulls it off, in part by making the character a bit daffy; he just can't help himself. And the producers surround him with jerks and dweebs and men less handsome or clever than himself to ensure that he's the person with whom we identify and whose opinions we share; the plot conveniently supports his genius.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    What matters is the reliable humor of modern characters trying to pass for old-fashioned ones, and the old-fashioned ones acting modern.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    "Threshold" is a comic book, and passable as such.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Without bringing anything radically new to the annals of sitcomedy, Louis-Dreyfus makes Christine feel fresh and real.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    As a professionally discerning adult, I could not help but notice that the characters are fairly stock, the situations familiar and, some nifty digital backgrounds notwithstanding, the production continually felt more like an elaborate game of let's pretend than it did a window into some real other world. I didn't buy a second of it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    Camp Rock isn't particularly good, but it's good at what it does. The product may be "inauthentic," if such a thing is even possible, but the way it will connect with a lot of little girls and more than a few little boys is real enough.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    There is little in the way of humor. What relief there is comes from supporting characters, like Chance's office manager, Lucy (Greta Lee), who let in a little fresh air from the normal world offstage. The performances are enjoyable.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    Though the TV version catches some of the tone and replicates the topicality of the big-screen originals, and shares executive producers, it lacks their grounded reality -- not too surprising, really, for a work of fiction based on a work of fiction -- as well as their warmth. [12 Aug 2005, p.E2]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    The first lines of this new chapter were promising, if not quite the fulfillment of his last wild nights at NBC, when caution was thrown to the wind.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    The historical documentaries are more successful than the cultural ones, for having a better story to tell, but all are made in a similar style, without written narration, driven by news clips and interviews (with scholars, participants and celebrity rememberers, Hanks naturally included).
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    It's solidly constructed and gives each actor a modicum of delightful moments — Wiest most of all. At the same time, there is something airless and artificial about the pilot.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Although the series is not as philosophically unsettling or politically unpredictable as his stage comedy, which gambols in the depths of human self-deception, it is unusually topical and thematically pointed for a people-on-a-couch comedy in the year 2015.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Robert Lloyd
    Though it starts out with a fair bit of energy, in spite of regular paroxysms of royal lust and pique, it becomes less engaging as it goes on and grows finally rather dull.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The current series has fresh air to breathe and new names to drop--Chin Chin, Caltech, Hillcrest, the Edison--and apparently plans to make a meal out of Hollywood. But it hits the traditional notes square on, moving fast in brief scenes and bursts of exposition, and splitting the difference between melodrama and naturalism.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Much of what's here has been seen before. But you can build many different houses from identical blocks, and finally, I'm Sorry is very much its own show, funny and grounded.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    Lucas could spend the rest of his life filling that hiatus with adventures whose outcomes are basically irrelevant to the larger story he has already finished telling. Many battles make up a war, after all, and each is an episode waiting to be animated. The two I've seen are bagatelles--brief and insubstantial but colorful and fluid.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Though it is not exactly in the spirit of the original, it should satisfy any "Boy" fans eager to see it.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Robert Lloyd
    Like a Hallmark card, it is a thing of prefabricated sentiment.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Gunn is best when showing us what he knows, reacting critically to the thing in front of him rather than speaking lines meant to jog the narrative or jack up the drama.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Robert Lloyd
    Ironically, given a show that so clearly wants to touch its audience--from that weighty one-word title on down--we have met, apart from Martin, hardly a single character who incorporates more than the hint of an actual person.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    "Curb" is a comedy of hostility, resentment, paranoia and obsessiveness. There are no feel-good moments, no life-brightening epiphanies, nothing, in fact, even vaguely resembling a resolution; things get as bad as you feared, and then the credits roll. [3 Jan 2004]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The Norwegians are the foreigners here, and Norway the foreign land. But that remoteness is part of the show's appeal.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    "Surface" is steeped in Spielberg, and is better Spielberg than Spielberg has managed in quite some time.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Well-crafted and a little--sometimes more than a little--unpleasant.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    While its cynicism about suburbia is superficially novel, the show itself is quite old-fashioned if not old hat: lame dad, smart mom, cute child, knowing child, strange neighbor. Door here, door there, couch in the middle.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Robert Lloyd
    The fate of the kids on the ground is closely bound with the fate of the people in orbit, and vice versa. But it is hard to care about the people in orbit, as seriously as you're asked to take their predicaments and sacrifices. And it is not much easier to care about the people on Earth.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    It's a mixed bag of a series that can seem smart or silly from scene to scene and is less convincing in its epic poses than in its most ordinary moments.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Once you accept that you are in for a certain kind of joke repeated over and over again — or three kinds of jokes, if you include those regarding the deterioration of mind and body and those about kids these days — and settle in to the show's rhythms, you find yourself, paradoxically, laughing more easily.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Pretty Little Liars managed to find an organic groove, and there's reason to think this close cousin can also find its feet and walk.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    There is a professional efficiency to much of the comedy. (It is funny sometimes.)
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Though satirical points are made--about gender roles and race, about progress, the lack of progress and the wrong kind of progress--the humor overall is goofy (and gooey), a kind of Mel Brooks romp for the 20-teens, minor but sweet.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Robert Lloyd
    None of this ever threatens to break into an interesting character study or story or examination of ideas.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    Still, for all the unlikely things the Gaytons make happen in order to get their characters into place, and the dogged refusal of a couple of those characters to become interesting at all, the show gathers steam as it goes on.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Clearly flung at the Spike's male demo–-"Get More Action" is the network tagline, which implies a viewership not getting as much as it would like--it has a slightly sour edge that some will just read as The Way Things Are.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Yet with reservations, and a little bit of squinting while the odd anomaly goes by--and having seen only the first two episodes, written and directed by Darabont himself--I would recommend it.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    While this sort of thing has been done before -- "Curb Your Enthusiasm" on the high end of Hollywood self-referentiality, and the nasty, brutish and short-lived "Fat Actress" with Kirstie Alley on the low -- it has been done here exceedingly well.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    New show runner Joshua Safran has, in any case, declared himself a fan of the show, promising changes more surgical than wholesale, a promise disappointing in its way. Nevertheless, he has trimmed much deadwood.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    As redeveloped by Cynthia Cidre (the 2007 CBS prime-time soap "Cane"), it is very much its [the original "Dallas"] heir, in spirit and execution.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    Detroit 1-8-7 is, rather than a slice of life, very much a slab of TV. And yet, as currently constituted, the show's only way forward is through the unlikely Fitch; his emotional awkwardness is more interesting than the cases he works.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Whether all, or indeed any, of the subjects here are actually "iconoclasts" is debatable -- "independent" is more like it -- but the title is meant to signal that this is something hipper and smarter and less conventionally angled than a Barbara Walters special and, at least on the basis of the two episodes available for review, it is.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    It's a mixed bag--of melodrama and comedy, historicism and revisionism--that is always good to look at, if not always to watch.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    Many of those gags are mechanical and flat, although they are delivered as though they were not. But when the leads are focused on each other, size no longer matters and the show flickers to life.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    As holiday gifts go, Telenovela, starring Eva Longoria as a Miami-based soap star, is a happy one: appealing, sweet, witty, traditional in its bones, modern in its complexion.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    Certainly, if the question is, can you make a dark, slightly depressing series starring the Muppets, the answer, obviously, is yes. Is this an inappropriate use of the characters? I don't know. Is it strange? Certainly.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The show moves fast without seeming to rush you. The timing, on the part of actors and editors alike, is excellent--both Bornheimer and Smith are good physical comedians--so that even while you can set your watch by the Next Bad Thing About to Happen, tension is created, suspense maintained.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    It works best at its most intimate, as family drama, and as another variant on "The Real World," in which people who would not ordinarily live together are made to do so.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Everyone pulls their weight; the jokes land lightly. Ferguson shows stuff that "Mad Men" never let him. Galvin is solid; Shively sweetly dim; Wood, behind thick spectacles, droll.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Produced by Morgan Neville and directed throughout by Eddie Schmidt with an expensive-looking creaminess, each episode spends upward of an hour going back and forth through the subject, in different ways: conversational (Handler hanging out with friends, some of them also famous, some of them also comedians, to discuss the matter at hand, or talking to experts in the relevant field); confessional (one on one with a clinical psychologist); and experiential, as she puts herself into different environments, or experiments on herself, to learn something new.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The cartoon show is the least of his series, but it is generally amusing and pretty to watch, and I like the way it rambles.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    It's an uneven show that lacks the finely crafted eccentricity of a "Northern Exposure" and "Twin Peaks" or "Picket Fences" (other strange-small-town shows featuring police officers), but when I say "uneven," I do mean that sometimes it's good.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It can feel a little predictable at times, even a little phony, including the odd meaningful speech made about purpose and authenticity.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    It is a sometimes clever, just as often clichéd mix of dystopian tropes, with performances ranging from nicely modulated to almost over the top, and some sly design that, along with some twisted PSAs, also accounts for most of the story’s humor. It is quite watchable and nothing special.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The flavor is high-style retro-modern, high-style B-picture.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Despite its troublesome subject, the series succeeds, moderately, in letting you know that it knows that Bond, as his creator conceived him, is a relic, and that Fleming's pulp-novel aspirations are worth skewering.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    There are well-written and well-mounted scenes and some good performances. It is not without suspense. But even at four hours, House of Saddam feels incomplete and scattered--a lessened, not a heightened reality.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Only Julianna Margulies on "The Good Wife" is carrying a comparable load, and though Roughness is a more fanciful construction than that CBS show, with more obvious emotional victories, it feels just as honest. It worked on me as intended.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    Some of these women are troubled, certainly, but none of them seems like trouble. Indeed, I felt a little sad at times, watching--not as I usually do, for the society that could produce such a program, but for the actual women in it, as far as I could make them out.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Director Rupert Wyatt (“Rise of the Planet of the Apes”) keeps the pilot chilly and drear, not overdoing the shocks and special effects.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Its only failings--and that is perhaps too strong a word--are a few re-created scenes of the actor’s acid sessions and some questionable or obvious juxtapositions of images. But the film has an interesting meditative pace and a kind of self-sufficient weight.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    At times it feels enough that the players seem to be enjoying themselves to enjoy it alongside them.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The production itself is sunny and conducive to a good mood. Coughlan wears well, as does Jason Priestley in the role of the fiancé she puts on hold.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Its pleasures are simple and familiar. There is the usual mix of boastful losers and shy winners, of tiresome cutting remarks and delightful delighted approval.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    he two episodes offered for review, "Food Revolutionaries" (including Auguste Escoffier, Julia Child and Clarence Birdseye) and "Carnivores," hop around within their subjects with no particular direction, but lots of anecdote and opinion; the tone is hopelessly antic, marked with animations and sound effects and never landing on any image for longer than it takes to take it in.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    "Blade: The Series" is pretty good, really, as these things go.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    What makes the show worth watching are some old-fashioned character relationships; no single performance tears up the place, but together they make something interesting.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Robert Lloyd
    Despite a fine cast... in the end it works neither as comedy, satire, drama nor soap opera.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    Whether or not they add up to much, the scenes play well, and there are enough heavy-breathing soap-operatics, random acts of violence and unanswered questions to keep one idly watching.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    Chicagoland is a mosaic, as befits its many-cultured metropolitan setting--and for better or worse. The series moves fast to get it all in, muscling you with its Big Shoulders and too-present hip-hoppy soundtrack, giving you just enough of its characters--including kids and cops, a doctor, a rapper, a restaurateur--to make you feel you should be getting more of them.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    This is news that never quite rises to the level of an event: "David Mamet Came to Television and All We Got Was a Better 'E-Ring.' "
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The narrative can sometimes be confusing. But the multiple, long arcs become legible, and sort themselves out satisfactorily in the end, if not in any way surprisingly. And there are good, under-the-top performances that enliven characters fetched from mothballs.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    The only experiment actually being done here is the ongoing one of determining just how long people will watch this sort of thing. That is an experiment with no end in sight.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    [Meyers] was shaky only fleetingly. He stuck his landings. He was cool, but clearly having fun.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    I can't say the pilot struck me as especially funny, but there are good things and talented people in it, and it looks good.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    I'll say now, before I get down to picking its nits--it has a few, and most might be predicted from the Spielberg oeuvre--that it's a splendid production, absolutely worth watching in its 10-hour entirety.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    An expectation of failure is built into the comedy, so that at times the contestants are funny only in the attempt to be funny. At other times, given the circumstances, it may seem miraculous that they can be funny at all.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It does not go deep. And yet in its moments, Graves can be quite persuasive, even moving. (It can be corny too, but corn can work.) Growling and grumbling like a spokesperson for phlegm as he takes Graves from childishness to youthfulness, Nolte finds everything touching in his character, and makes you feel it too.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The cast is excellent, and there's potential here, even though tonight's opening episode, as pilots will, tries a little too hard.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Robert Lloyd
    Sinise, a real movie star and the co-founder of Chicago's famed Steppenwolf Theatre, is a fine actor, and so are they all, all fine actors. But none has much to do here -- the dialogue makes "Dragnet" seem positively chatty.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    While there's nothing particularly wrong with Do Not Disturb, neither is there anything so inspired as to make you leap to your feet, crying, "Yes! This is what television needs! More workplace comedies! More hotels!"
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    Much about the pilot felt flat or programmatic to me, but much was likable as well, especially the nonchalant tenderness between the male leads. And the cast is good.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    It's probably enough to say that if you like this sort of thing, this is just the sort of thing you'll like. (If the tautology fits, wear it.) Rodriguez knows how this machine works as well as anyone alive. Whether such sensationalist kicks are good for us "as a people," or indeed as people in particular, is a question the culture and its guardians and gadflies have been batting around for years. A decision is not due any time soon.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The Goode Family, which is nicely acted and well animated, works best when the cultural potshots give way to the more basic human needs of its characters.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    If the series is too schematic and too noncommittal to really function as satire, that doesn't matter much; it’s fun--“The Good Wife” was always the best at its funnest--and Winstead has just the right mix of innocence, intelligence, idealism and pluck for the job. And it functions capably as a monster movie.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    The celebration and surrender are enough to put the viewer in a vicarious good mood, no matter how unconvincing its context.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Ricci, always playing a person rather than a personality, is the reason to watch. It’s a subtle evocation of a famously electrifying character, free from grand gestures, centered behind her eyes.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    At times the production can seem underbudgeted, the direction overwrought. Here and there, the dialogue sounds as if it had been written by an alien who picked up English from broadcasts of B-pictures. As the series' resident alien, Charles Dance--both as a disembodied and later an elaborately embodied, commanding voice--gets the best of this business.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    [USA Network's] shows are for the most part solidly constructed, but where holes exist or the structure is creaky, they are shored up by the charm of their always well-cast players. Two new series bowing this week and next exemplify the house style; both are impressive out of the gate.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    The central business of selling “Mr. First Lady” is not all that compelling, and the integration of the real and fictional worlds is so familiar that it offers no charge on its own. Early on, one wants it to be more daring, or darker, or simply funnier; later episodes, as personal business between the leads come into play, and wholly fictional characters arrive, do perk up.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    All in all, this is a dynamic, addictive rendition of a complicated novel that catches the spirit of Dickens' "roaring streets" where "the noisy and the eager, and the arrogant and the froward and the vain, fretted and chafed, and made their usual uproar."
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    It lurches in tone and an accelerated narrative that seems at times to leave holes in the storytelling, gaps that draw you up short where you should be just be sailing along. Still, if it's a bit of a mess, it's not an uninteresting one.

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