For 781 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 59% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Robert Lloyd's Scores

Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Samurai Jack: Season 5
Lowest review score: 0 I Wanna Marry Harry: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 30 out of 781
781 tv reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    It is a sometimes clever, just as often clichéd mix of dystopian tropes, with performances ranging from nicely modulated to almost over the top, and some sly design that, along with some twisted PSAs, also accounts for most of the story’s humor. It is quite watchable and nothing special.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    It is buried in whimsicality and paeans to "feeling" and leaping into the void. And the stars do feel out of sync. (Williams is more comfortable riffing with James Wolk--"Mad Men's" Bob Benson--as... some other guy who works there.) We will give it some time.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    A light dusting of Milton notwithstanding, its pitch is mainstream and middlebrow. A decently made series that is neither particularly original nor entirely predictable.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    This is only an average situation comedy, but even the great ones have worn that makeup.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    While much of it is silly, corny or clichéd and relies more on easy effects — the power ballad, the overwrought sex scene — than on the subtle explorations of people and place that the pilot seems to promise, the series is, on the whole, highly digestible summer fun.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    I can't say the pilot struck me as especially funny, but there are good things and talented people in it, and it looks good.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    The show fulfills its mission: It is an industrial entertainment, a candy-colored machine to snare budding consumers who (once again) are not being served so much as being served up.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    The celebration and surrender are enough to put the viewer in a vicarious good mood, no matter how unconvincing its context.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    If the Awful Truth of the Global Meltdown is the big carrot "Jericho" dangles before you, it is no more compelling than the question of which of the available good-looking girls Ulrich is going to get close to.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    It's a comic book, basically, a B-movie, a pulp fiction, and low enough in the cultural reckoning of things to set its own rules with impunity.... Part of the pleasure of the series is that particular pleasure of watching a super-heroic character who can't fail.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    It isn't until the glimmer of a plot finally emerges, after Todd stumbles into a Middle Eastern market with a can of Thunder Muscle, eliciting sudden mysterious interest--that the series inches past mere mockery to the promise of more muscular misadventure.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    James and Lathan are appealing--you could build a decent episodic series around his by-the-book rookie and her hard-as-nails veteran quite easily--and while Shots Fired lumbers as an issue drama, it’s diverting enough as a cop show.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    An aura of staginess, of manufactured drama and strenuous comedy, surrounds the show and works into its every cranny and nook. As a result, one never feels that the pair are in even as much danger as they're actually in. Yet it is not without charm; indeed, its appeal is in its pretense.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    If hardly a moment feels plausible, the show has energy to spare and so many balls in the air by the end of the pilot that it's hard not to want to see where they will come down.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    It works best at its most intimate, as family drama, and as another variant on "The Real World," in which people who would not ordinarily live together are made to do so.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    Wootton is a quick-minded, thematically consistent improviser who thoroughly knows his characters, and obviously something of a daredevil: You can get hurt doing this stuff, or arrested. But as in Baron Cohen's comedies, the cleverness of the star is too much the point.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    The setting is exotic, and the characters are colorful in ordinary, workaday ways. The series' one real failing is that it doesn't completely trust them to carry the drama, laying on the high-volume audiovisual tics and tricks of reality television to remind us to be interested and excited. And yet it's the smaller, unvarnished, passing moments that sell the show--where its particular poetry, and even its comedy, can be found.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    It feels altogether too on-the-nose, a rigged game in which almost all the points are awarded to Floyd. ... Pharoah, an "SNL" veteran who has not done much straight acting, pulls his weight throughout, but working with Rapaport, as with Coleman and the low-key excellent Jacob Ming-Trent as Floyd's wisdom-dispensing friend and roommate Ron Balls, lifts him to that vaunted next level.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    Nevertheless, this is a kind of American classic that goes right against the grain of what cartoons are supposed to be.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    Whatever else you make of it--and it's enough to say that if you like this sort of thing, you will like this thing--it's all, or partly, for a good cause.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    None of the characters--including the usual smart hot girl, mean hot girl and mean hot guy--range beyond well-established types, and the show would have to stand on a chair to aim any lower. But it is mostly sweet-tempered and oddly moral, and, as I write these words, I do not hate it.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    It has an appealing modesty that survives its bouts of aesthetic overexcitement--the occasionally lurching camera, hammering soundtrack, the sentimental pop song laid over the last couple of minutes as the principals silently end a long, hard day.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    I can't say I found much of Workaholics especially funny, but neither do I have it in my heart to hate it. On a craft level, it's very nicely made, the actors are weirdly appealing, and its spirit is not mean, but sweet.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    I like what I've seen, though there are more than a couple of moments where the only possible reaction is "Naaah."
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    The series is not so different from, or significantly worse--or better--than the network's other two season premieres, "Melrose Place" and "The Vampire Diaries," which also affix stock characters, played mostly by good-looking young folk, to standard plot lines sexed up with pop songs and different flavors of visual glamour. Because they do not aim particularly high, they pretty much hit what they aim at.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    In spite of some talented actors, it all seems more scripted than lived, referring not the world but a world of things you've seen on TV, handled well enough to make Mercy passable, but never exceptional, television.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    Though it is flat and obvious at times, and some might call it ill-paced--I think of it as leisurely--it is only a little sanctimonious and not at all stuffed.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    Their [Gethard and Parnell] interplay, once things get moving, is appealing, if not quite compelling, but what sold me on the pilot was the moment when 14-year-old Dylan Blue, as Gethard's beyond-the-law kid brother, revealed his dark side, and his gun; I was a little frightened.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    Much about the pilot felt flat or programmatic to me, but much was likable as well, especially the nonchalant tenderness between the male leads. And the cast is good.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    It may be seen as a kinder, gentler, funnier cousin to Fox's bitter " 'Til Death."

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