For 708 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Robert Lloyd's Scores

Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Homeland: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 I Wanna Marry Harry: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 30 out of 708
708 tv reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    There is a quiet naturalism to the production, quite distinct from Hollywood horror, in which every trick in the audio-visual book is marshaled to jolt you as far as possible out of your seat when the scare comes, and also from supposedly found-footage films ("The Blair Witch Project" and its progeny) that use aesthetic chaos to suggest actuality. This is altogether more mature.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Crafted to satisfy those generations of viewers for whom even "The Empire Strikes Back" looks quaint and old-fashioned, it is no less thought-provoking for being made to be fun.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The show improves as it gathers context, and before long you stop thinking about what makes this Arrested Development different from all other Arrested Developments.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's delightful, all in all.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    [An] enlightening biographical documentary.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The strength of the series lies not in the whodunit elements--it isn't hard to work out who's behind it, even if it isn't immediately apparent why--but in its eye for local details and small human gestures.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    A dark and splendid "Dr. Who" spinoff with overtones of "Men in Black" and "Buffy the Vampire Slayer."
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    [Director and co-writer Dominic Cooke] does a good job of supporting the story, working in an economical epic style--shooting in fields and forests and big medieval spaces, but with the crowds and pageantry dialed down--that keeps the action human and underscores the idea that this stretch of history boiled down to a family feud.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    While it is funny, sometimes very funny, it also has the quality of a gift--a gift from the artists to themselves and one another as much as to their audience.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    A continually surprising thriller that maintains an air of imminent danger through its five or so hours (in six episodes), State of Play is a grander, more romantic creation [than Prime Suspect 6].
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The show moves fast without seeming to rush you. The timing, on the part of actors and editors alike, is excellent--both Bornheimer and Smith are good physical comedians--so that even while you can set your watch by the Next Bad Thing About to Happen, tension is created, suspense maintained.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It was good, it was very, very good.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    [Master of None] is smart, sweet and funny in ways both familiar and fresh.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    All in all, it's a rich work, full of detail and small moments, and grounded in reality by an utterly believable supporting cast partly drawn from the school where the series was shot.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Co-written by O'Dowd with Nick Vincent Murphy, it is a finely crafted little jewel of a show. Its humor is quiet--which is not to say polite or conventional--but nearly every laugh line delivers.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    A smart and highly suspenseful miniseries.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    More a sketch than a thorough retelling--though still recommended as such--and as balanced as you can be about the scandal given the facts, the film begins at the end, or just before it, with the remarkable, once much-bootlegged footage of Nixon preparing to resign.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It is a suitably complicated and pictorially engaging work of period suburban mystery, with a large cast of characters
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    There is a current of delight that runs through the show different from other reality contestants, where the grown-ups may feel they have their lives on the line; there is disappointment here, but little bitterness.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It matters less whether UnREAL is accurate than whether it is just true enough to provide a foundation for credible drama--and it very much does.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    A smart, amiable, colorful new cartoon series.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Style doesn't sink the story or make the details and milieu feel any less authentic. It will help the viewer to have a high tolerance for suspense because in every strand of the story there is a continual threat of violence and because most of the characters are on balance sympathetic.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The show is a little motley, owing to a willingness to play with style and to give its directors room to move, and the plotting can feel a little methodical when contrasted with a greater urge to let character emerge and deepen gradually. You're never completely unaware of the artifice, but the series feels very alive nevertheless, as it moves in and out of the tropes, embracing some, avoiding others.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    A "heightened reality" show, one might call it, but one which makes its subject palpable and which, because it is made with care, lets you care too. It's the more artful portrait, paradoxically, that paints the truer picture.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Convincingly mounted and splendidly played, the show packs in a lot without seeming to, moving from one weird scene to another while maintaining a kind of emotional integrity.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    I'll say now, before I get down to picking its nits--it has a few, and most might be predicted from the Spielberg oeuvre--that it's a splendid production, absolutely worth watching in its 10-hour entirety.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's very funny, beautifully played, sometimes touching and, though its premise is familiar--rich family loses money--quite its own animal.
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    National Treasure can feel moody to a fault, and there are times, as in the climactic courtroom scenes, when the drama gets a little... dramatic. (Attorneys who should object keep mum for the sake of the monologue.) But it also does capture an awful sense of isolation in close quarters, the sadness of lives that never quite align. And there’s plenty to chew on from beginning to the end.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Costello (who has subbed for David Letterman) makes a fine host--a bit reverential at times, but never as pious as, say, James Lipton can become over at the similarly configured "Inside the Actors Studio."
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The plotting sometimes sacrifices sense in the name of comedy and provides easy targets you won’t particularly mind seeing killed and eaten, but it’s tight and propulsive, and because the action takes place over a short period of time, the series never turns into "Variations on a Theme of Zombie Cannibalism." And the performances are charming.

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