For 558 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 39% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Robert Lloyd's Scores

Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Office (UK): Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 I Wanna Marry Harry: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 26 out of 558
558 tv reviews
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Robert Lloyd
    Given the extravagances of the plot and the characters, that it feels plausibly seated in the real world is a testament to everyone involved in its production. But it is especially due to the actors.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Robert Lloyd
    To my mind, it's the best series of the fall, and with the tonally similar "Top of the Lake," possibly of the year.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Robert Lloyd
    True Detective runs slow and steady without ever seeming to drag. Even minor characters get room to breathe, and seem independently alive; the briefest scenes seem to imply life beyond the frame.... The dance [Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson] do together here is work of a very high order, and all the reason you need to watch.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Robert Lloyd
    As did the six previous episodes, the new installments generate a tension so awful, from circumstances so awfully lifelike, that you have to watch at times from behind laced fingers, with teeth clenched and the remote control close at hand.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Robert Lloyd
    It integrates the boredom, self-delusion, dashed hopes and struggle for power into something bigger, and potentially better, and functions not only as a continuation of the story but a convincing conclusion.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Robert Lloyd
    Each [episode] stands on its own as a TV art film, an independent work of short fiction.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    It's a funny show, fundamentally, but not always, by intention. Not everything works, or works equally well; like Louie, Louis is only human.... Louie is a thought process made flesh.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    For all its willful outrageousness, Arrested Development is sort of gripping -- a continuing story that one actually wants to see continue, which is more than can be said of most of the new dramas the season produced. [31 Oct 2003, p.E1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    By rooting Top of the Lake in the real, Campion gives her more fanciful inspirations legs, and the mystery--which is, needless to say, not merely or even mostly the mystery of a missing girl--room to breathe. I have no idea where any of it's headed. But I am going along.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    The domestic version... is every bit as good as the original.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    What is remarkable about "Life Support" is how it avoids every pitfall of the standard issue-based TV film and, indeed, of most TV films, period.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    The performances are so wonderful it feels wrong to single any out. But Whishaw finds great power in stillness; Hiddleston fits himself admirably to his character's stages and turns of mind, resolving his coldness with his warmth, his cruelty with his generosity. And there is Beale's Falstaff--marvelously poignant, a scoundrel-hero, getting everything wrong. His sorrow at losing the transformed Hal is as tragic a moment as any here, his fall no less thunderous than Richard's.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    This may be the better work [than "No Direction Home"], for its depth of feeling and its relatively more forthcoming and knowable subject.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    At once more modest and more ambitious than its predecessor; more focused on detail and yet more expansive. It is also excruciatingly funny, with an emphasis on excruciating.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    As much as I love what Lewis and Patinkin—as well as Baccarin and Saylor—do here, Danes is what makes Homeland remarkable.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    Notwithstanding a certain stylistic chilliness and my sense of it having been pitched on the back of "Inception," it promised to be one of the year's best and most interesting new series. Having seen four episodes now, I'd say the promise has been largely kept.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    Enlightened is to my mind the most interesting and ambitious series of the fall season.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    It is big, beautiful, beautifully acted and romantic, its passions expressed with that particular British reserve that serves only to make them burn brighter.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Lloyd
    In its emphasis on character over plot it reminds me of movies from the pre-Spielberg '70s, and is in so many ways what I want from television that I feel almost like phoning each of you personally to deliver the news.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Crafted to satisfy those generations of viewers for whom even "The Empire Strikes Back" looks quaint and old-fashioned, it is no less thought-provoking for being made to be fun.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The show improves as it gathers context, and before long you stop thinking about what makes this Arrested Development different from all other Arrested Developments.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's delightful, all in all.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    [An] enlightening biographical documentary.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The strength of the series lies not in the whodunit elements--it isn't hard to work out who's behind it, even if it isn't immediately apparent why--but in its eye for local details and small human gestures.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    A dark and splendid "Dr. Who" spinoff with overtones of "Men in Black" and "Buffy the Vampire Slayer."
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    A continually surprising thriller that maintains an air of imminent danger through its five or so hours (in six episodes), State of Play is a grander, more romantic creation [than Prime Suspect 6].
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The show moves fast without seeming to rush you. The timing, on the part of actors and editors alike, is excellent--both Bornheimer and Smith are good physical comedians--so that even while you can set your watch by the Next Bad Thing About to Happen, tension is created, suspense maintained.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    All in all, it's a rich work, full of detail and small moments, and grounded in reality by an utterly believable supporting cast partly drawn from the school where the series was shot.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Co-written by O'Dowd with Nick Vincent Murphy, it is a finely crafted little jewel of a show. Its humor is quiet--which is not to say polite or conventional--but nearly every laugh line delivers.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    A smart and highly suspenseful miniseries.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    More a sketch than a thorough retelling--though still recommended as such--and as balanced as you can be about the scandal given the facts, the film begins at the end, or just before it, with the remarkable, once much-bootlegged footage of Nixon preparing to resign.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It is a suitably complicated and pictorially engaging work of period suburban mystery, with a large cast of characters
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    There is a current of delight that runs through the show different from other reality contestants, where the grown-ups may feel they have their lives on the line; there is disappointment here, but little bitterness.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    A smart, amiable, colorful new cartoon series.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    A "heightened reality" show, one might call it, but one which makes its subject palpable and which, because it is made with care, lets you care too. It's the more artful portrait, paradoxically, that paints the truer picture.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Convincingly mounted and splendidly played, the show packs in a lot without seeming to, moving from one weird scene to another while maintaining a kind of emotional integrity.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    I'll say now, before I get down to picking its nits--it has a few, and most might be predicted from the Spielberg oeuvre--that it's a splendid production, absolutely worth watching in its 10-hour entirety.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's very funny, beautifully played, sometimes touching and, though its premise is familiar--rich family loses money--quite its own animal.
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Costello (who has subbed for David Letterman) makes a fine host--a bit reverential at times, but never as pious as, say, James Lipton can become over at the similarly configured "Inside the Actors Studio."
    • 39 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    "Surface" is steeped in Spielberg, and is better Spielberg than Spielberg has managed in quite some time.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's not quite perfection. Nearly everything to do with the character of Piper's fiancé, Larry (Jason Biggs), somewhat based on Kerman's now-husband Larry Bloom, seems problematic to me. Similarly, in emphasizing the humanity of the inmates, their warders have been made to look, for the most part, pathetic, foolish or monstrous. That is remedied in part this season by a deeper look at the staff, even as some of the more difficult prisoners, like Uzo Aduba's Crazy Eyes, are brought into better focus.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The two episodes I've seen are very good--engagingly twisted, more invested in ideas than jokes, often funny, usually admirable.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The current episodes have more weight and intensity; they come off a shade darker and yet more sympathetic to its cast of co-dependent lost souls.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The Fades works.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    "Rome" is smart, dirty fun.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The glamour in Pan Am may indeed be manufactured--doubly manufactured, given the re-created places and planes--but it's not empty: The show says, yes, this is as good as it looks, and it looks very good
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Every performance here is good--the young actors are remarkable--and though the script sometimes goes just where you would expect it to, the characters seem authentically unpredictable.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Battle Creek may be a little low-boil compared to other network mysteries, which I don't account a fault; even when it runs to caricature, it stays convincing. And if it doesn't break any new ground, it nevertheless feels fresh and genuine.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    As a story about how the past became the present (which makes us, in relation to its characters, people of the future), it is very much in line with its subject, and has been made with much the same mix of enchantment and suspense.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Samantha Who? is as perfectly realized a comedy as the fall has to offer.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The already evident lesson is that a moldy premise need not stand in the way of a good time. [22 Sept 2003, p.E1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The contest consists of family members answering questions about one another to win money and prizes, which is straightforward enough and entertaining on its own. But what makes it work so well, I am surprised to say, is the Big Gimmick: the fact that the show is staged on the contestants' front lawn.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    As directed by Peter Berg, this is smart, handsome TV, a witty, measured mix of sci-fi, soap and satire that offers new twists on old tropes.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    A considerably above-average Generation Y sitcom that manages to be both sharp and sentimental, like "Seinfeld" with feeling.
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    There are also familiar dialogues between the brain and the body (golden) and a bit of hand-in-the-Jello-bowl mugging (not so golden), but all in all, the special lives up to its name. Neither finished, nor diminished.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    There is plenty of irony in Silverman's presentations, but her title is sincere.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Even with its problems--we'll get to those presently--it's one of the best shows of the fall season.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Well made and never boring--the director is Julian Jarrold ("Becoming Jane")--Appropriate Adult is a first-class example of what British filmmakers do well when they are not trying to look like American filmmakers.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The alien Doctor is something of a Sherlock Holmes, and Sherlock Holmes is something of an alien. This is played often for laughs, in the series' funniest, and goofiest, year yet.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    One of the season's best new shows.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    [Writer/director/voice of Cleric] Steve Purcell's comic timing is splendid, as is his staging of the action scenes.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    This air of familiarity notwithstanding, the pilot is splendidly rendered; effective in the expected ways in a way that makes you forget you expected them.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It takes no time at all for the new team to establish its authority; the new "Who" feels at once traditional and fresh, and completely right.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Despite its equivocal title, Almost the Truth beats any Python documentary yet made for comprehensiveness and depth.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The dialogue has a nice snap, the jokes come from just to the left of where you expect them to, and the players are all first-rate.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    A few caricatures stick out among the characters, but the subtler conceptions, on the page and in performance, win out.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    A delightful, knockabout new sitcom.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    [An] immediately exciting new season.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Artistically, it may be an unnecessary appendix, but I'm not complaining. More pie? I will make room somehow.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Community continues to achieve a tricky balance of cynicism, sentiment and surreality.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Though neither naive nor mum about its subject's destructive complications and contradictions, his brutal youth and abuse of women, Alex Gibney's film concentrates on Brown the performer--both as a musician and as a public political personage, the voice of black pride (say it loud!) and economic self-sufficiency.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The heroine's fearless and clever character, the self-knowledge and self-possession her tormentors lack, and her gift for survival are fixed from first to last. She is sometimes thwarted but never altered. If this makes The Book of Negroes less psychologically complex than it otherwise might be, there are real pleasures and comforts to be had from it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    In the wonderful Family Tree, hangdog Chris O'Dowd, finding his life stalled after losing a girlfriend and a job in short order, goes in search of his roots and relatives.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's possible that, barring a confession, you will come to the end of The Jinx unsatisfied, wondering how it was you spent six unreclaimable hours in the company of a person you have decided is a creep. Either way, it's fascinating as it gets there.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Wolf Hall is both stately and fast-moving, exceedingly still yet highly suspenseful.... Though the series comes to a natural stopping place, it also feels, at the finish, incomplete.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    This year, by contrast [to last year], the drama flows more naturally; it cuts closer to home, and nearer the bone, allowing Smith and McGovern, particularly, deeper material than has previously been their portion
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The series, which is confident from the start, its world fully formed and well-performed, isn't a retelling.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    As before there is a nice balance between social drama and personal business, the tragic and the comic, exaggeration and authenticity.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It is a sweet, rather sad piece that--like the songs, by Whedon and his brother Jed, which are at once mock-heroic and actually heroic, mock-moving and moving in fact--works both as parody and as a drama. It also works as comedy, from line to line and moment to moment, but it is not, really, a comedy
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's a highly satisfying riff on the original work, as well as a credit to the modern British costume drama.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Delightful new science-fiction comedy.... Like candy, it is sweet, and sometimes sticky or nutty or surprising.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Though it has the pokey pace and flat affect of his other films--for Burns, history is elegy--it is also one of his best works: more tightly focused than usual in time and place, with a clear shape, dramatic arcs and a conclusion that is at once cautionary and moving, topical and timeless.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Outsourced seems to me the most deftly realized sitcom of the new season. It is no closer to reality than any of its Thursday night neighbors ( Ken Kwapis, of "The Office" and other good things, developed it and directed the pilot), but it has a top-flight cast, characters who show you who they are rather than telling you, smart writing, sure rhythms and a cheerful attitude.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Without making any extraordinary claims for it, it is easy to watch and to recommend, mostly sweet-natured, with a host of well-shaded performances and almost nothing to insult your intelligence.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It is amiably absurd and mildly profane, entertaining in a dry, droll way.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Cop show, fantasy, mystery, comedy, romance, puzzle -- there are a lot of ways to approach "Life on Mars," which begins its second and final season tonight on BBC America, and they all pay off.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's a conclusion that seemed to me both contrived and honest, if that makes any sense, and it left me disturbed, though not, as Doctor Who often has, a sobbing wreck.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    [The taped linking] bits feel a little forced compared to the sketches, which are consistently smart and smartly acted and flow easily from ordinary premises to weird conclusions.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    While this sort of thing has been done before -- "Curb Your Enthusiasm" on the high end of Hollywood self-referentiality, and the nasty, brutish and short-lived "Fat Actress" with Kirstie Alley on the low -- it has been done here exceedingly well.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Garbus, director of the Oscar-nominated, Emmy-winning "The Farm: Angola, USA," fills in many of the blanks--to an impressive extent, given the obsessively guarded privacy of her subject--in a film that is both meditative and exciting, like the game it concerns, and mercilessly penetrating even as it reserves judgment on a man whose outrageousness practically demands it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The show has a nice sense of detail and a comic puckishness that every zombie police procedural needs. At times genuinely scary in the way it's meant to be, it's also moving in the way it's meant to be.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Project Runway is a hard act to follow. Still, if you like watching people make (sometimes) beautiful clothes from nothing in no time--the first challenge is to make a little black dress from a little black T-shirt--The Fashion Show has that too.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    What makes it so engaging is not that the series finds anything new to twist, but that it works so well with and within the strictures of the well-thumbed genres it combines in equal parts: spy thriller, murder mystery, backstage drama, triangular romance.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's one of the best things to come out of the fall season, but as a recreational television watcher, I like it too.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The show is consistently clever and lively, well played and directed, its corners filled with nice throwaway lines and small visual jokes.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    If Johnson sometimes stretches a point to make a point — the link between public hygiene and competitive skateboarding, say — he is always intriguing and entertaining, his show thought-provoking and compulsively fun to watch.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's a work whose immense vitality and a persuasive naturalism overcome its occasional paroxysms of style or hammered-home points.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    By not belaboring the point--Ryan is not crazy, there is nothing supernatural afoot--the show stays fresh, the gimmick fades. The humor is frequently scatological or sexual, but a mitigating sweetness enfolds it all.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The real miracle here is how deftly the show avoids the soggy cliches of redemption so many of its forerunners have embraced. [26 Sept 2003, p.E1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    There are no heroes or villains here, only people working out or being carried toward their individual destinies. And in who we root for and in what we root for them to choose, we also define ourselves.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    You will find things still generally a mess come Sunday, but now there is at least the possibility of light.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    As madly tied to one another as they are, the Rayburns are, in the first few episodes, at least, a little hard to care about. Yet there is enough happening by the third episode that I will definitely watch the fourth, just to see what might or might not happen, what herrings might be red, and what surprises might be truly surprising.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The elegance of its production and mostly measured pace, though it may confound those who prefer the supernatural served fast and furious, keeps the drama persuasive.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It is a smart, affable, mostly unpredictable ensemble comedy that reminds us that in the 500-channel universe, fine things can happen in unlikely places, as long as you are clever about budget, commit to a sensible number of episodes--in this case 10--write well and cast right, and that what matters ultimately to heaven is not the eminence of the venue but the quality of the work.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's a little movie that feels big, without being self-consciously cinematic.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Hotel Babylon is willfully bright and sexy--like the Parker's décor, it updates a '70s sensibility--but also has a nice eye for detail, good minor characters and well-flowing dialogue.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The TV version preserves the form and excited tone of the podcast, with better production values and a bigger stage.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    "Curb" is a comedy of hostility, resentment, paranoia and obsessiveness. There are no feel-good moments, no life-brightening epiphanies, nothing, in fact, even vaguely resembling a resolution; things get as bad as you feared, and then the credits roll. [3 Jan 2004]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Fresh Off the Boat may not be exactly the series of Huang's dreams, or completely true to the life he has sold to show business, but it's a consistently funny and even important one, with some lovely, nuanced performances.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Apart from a surfeit of split screen effects and some overbearing soundtrack selections, I have no quarrel with this series at all, and wore a lump in my throat through much of it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The goings-on feel fresh in the way that kids at play make spy or space stories their own, even as they repeat what TV and the movies have taught them. This is just that with a budget, some deeper experience and the help of Jennifer Saunders, Rebecca Front, Dougray Scott and David Harewood, among interesting others.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The series is a better-heeled, better-paced and, within the bounds of its own Portland-ish modesty, a more ambitious extension of the occasional videos that Armisen and Portland resident Brownstein have posted online over the past few years under the name ThunderAnt.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    If Burns' customary elegiac pace doesn't always work for his subjects--it is the opposite of everything we're told about Theodore Roosevelt, at least--he gives you time to really look at what he's brought to show you.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    That the funniest straight-ahead sitcom of the American fall television season is a 2-year-old British import airing on a basic-cable network is because of a few things: a dearth of new American sitcoms, the availability of road-tested foreign product, and the ongoing expansion of the vast tracts of basic cable into the kind of programming that has traditionally defined broadcast television.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It feels productively mysterious. The show tells you covertly a lot about the characters, building them up through bits of behavior and stray remarks that can seem contradictory at first but do start to cohere into something more complex.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    More troubling, and the bulk of his case, is the testimony of former Scientologists, some of them high-ranked, some of them claiming inside knowledge. Defenders of the faith will say that they are lying now when they say they were lying then, but they seem quite credible and composed to me--amazed at the people they'd been, astonished by what they couldn't see, ashamed at their actions or inaction.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Even if you don't particularly feel for Selina--you don't root for her, particularly, or against her--there is continual pleasure in watching the actress make her go.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The pilot is an especially persuasive hour of action-adventure, but subsequent lower-budget episodes preserve the esprit and suspense.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It is cinematic in the sense that nothing in it looks quite real. But it works: This is not the London known as jolly and old, but the new chilly city of glass, a place of missed connections, of aliens and alienation. And the smart dialogue and warm performances--even Holmes has a discernible beating heart, or perhaps two--keep ice from forming on the production.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Only Julianna Margulies on "The Good Wife" is carrying a comparable load, and though Roughness is a more fanciful construction than that CBS show, with more obvious emotional victories, it feels just as honest. It worked on me as intended.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's an accomplished piece of work. And it gains heft from a number of impressive cameos.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    I haven't seen ancient ordinary life so well represented since "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum," and I am not being funny.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    I like this a lot.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    [Political Animals is] a high-class, relatively naturalistic, behind-closed-doors soap opera that plays in fairly obvious yet also fairly affecting ways with the space between public face and private pain and is made highly watchable by an excellent cast that finds the human among the hokum.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Creator Ian Edelman keeps his characters on the right side of caricature and avoids the kind of melodramatic confrontations their relations might typically suggest.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It is an homage and a celebration, with something of a high-class homemade feel.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    [Sontag's] personal magnetism is very much part of the story.... This alone makes for a highly watchable film, though Kates also dresses the screen with poetical visual interludes.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    As produced it is more like a trip to the zoo, with the scribes imported into a set that suggests a writers' room (white board, bulletin board, index cards, big table, coffee) as a lion cage might simulate the veld. Even so, it feels like a glimpse of the real thing. Rash makes an excellent host-moderator.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    There is little in the way of "action"--it is possibly the slowest, most deliberative show on television, which is one of the things that makes it so lovely and mysterious.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The show can be, in odd passing moments, unexpectedly, almost nervily touching.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's smart without either condescending to or patronizing the viewer.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Sweet, lyrical and a little cracked, it's worth seeking out.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Tyler Labine makes a most excellent wacky bearded sidekick, and Rick Gonzalez and Valarie Rae Miller round out the Scooby Gang. Auteur of slackerdom Kevin Smith ("Clerks") directed the pilot, which maintains a nice fairy tale tone even as it stresses the banality of the infernal.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The artfully composed images are both crystal clear and cinematically creamy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The dialogue is always to the point, yet it gives even the bit players enough room to create something memorable.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It works because it's less about who we were then--it's a fantasy of who we were then, really--than about who we are now.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Its aspirations and its execution are perfectly in sync; there is no way that Meyers could overact, or, indeed, not act enough, that would not suit the material.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Silicon Valley is a comedy, certainly, and a very funny one, but it doesn't spend all its time reminding you of the fact.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It is all very beautiful.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It is a bit like Martin Scorsese's "After Hours," filtered through the sensibility of a Whit Stillman and sprinkled with "Flight of the Conchords"--and yet it feels new, because it is so completely itself, consistently itself, a mix of romance, adventure and stoner comedy (there is a lot of pot about) that never abandons the world the rest of us can recognize.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The current series has fresh air to breathe and new names to drop--Chin Chin, Caltech, Hillcrest, the Edison--and apparently plans to make a meal out of Hollywood. But it hits the traditional notes square on, moving fast in brief scenes and bursts of exposition, and splitting the difference between melodrama and naturalism.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The writing rings true as often as not, and the actors do not wave their arms or raise their voices unduly; they play to the human moments between the rim shots.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Some will find it offensive, immoral, irresponsible--a highly defensible position. It's also very funny, a thing of twisted genius and, for the next eight weeks possibly the most original comedy on television.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's very good, although as sad and disturbing as the mustache implies.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Terriers is a wonderfully well-conceived, well-made and well-played series about a pair of soft-boiled downmarket private detectives in over their heads in San Diego.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Though firmly in the Lucas tradition, this is also a Disney cartoon, for a Disney crowd and a Disney corporation--watching, you can almost feel the plastic and the plush--and whatever the characters are up to, however cute or sentimental the business, it is smartly designed and cinematically staged, and not hard to enjoy.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Rick Beyer's fascinating, detailed and oddly delightful account of the World War II military camouflage artists whose job was not to hide men and materiel but to create battalions where none actually existed, drawing German eyes and ears to the wrong place.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's not the greatest thing since sliced bread but rather a well-made sort of sliced bread, a thing you have had before but prepared with quality ingredients by bakers who know their business.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    That the two men are in their 30s makes their perseverance more poignant--to somewhat overstate the case--and that they have no money places them in a long and honorable line of comedians who cannot put two cents together to buy a glass of seltzer.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The leads are all marvelous, with a complementary elemental division of attitudes: Kemper, air; Burrell, fire; Kane, earth; and Krakowski, water, as I reckon it. They rise to the occasion and make it an event.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The first episode took a little while to seem real, but, as Holder would say, I was feeling it before long. Like Linden, I was drawn back in.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It is funny and disturbing in exactly the manner and proportions one would expect from his earlier works.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    McKenzie's best moments are all spent in his [new partner Harvey Bullock's (Donal Logue)] company. Bullock loosens him up even as Bullock puts him off, signaling that their uneasy partnership will become an easier one. He performs a similar service to the whole production, bringing it down to earth, keeping it from becoming too much of a comic-book gizmo with its wash of rain grays and rot rusts and spittoon bronzes and Frank Miller lighting effects.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Yet with reservations, and a little bit of squinting while the odd anomaly goes by--and having seen only the first two episodes, written and directed by Darabont himself--I would recommend it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Branagh plays up the dark side of this town-in-the-country pastoral--partly by turning exposition into sometimes violent action, partly by trimming the banter--to deepen the romance. (He likes a pratfall, though.) Mostly it works.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Gunn is best when showing us what he knows, reacting critically to the thing in front of him rather than speaking lines meant to jog the narrative or jack up the drama.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It is, basically, good-looking fun, and if I say that much of this might have been written by a 12-year-old, you must understand that I mean that as a good thing.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Well-crafted and a little--sometimes more than a little--unpleasant.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    There are times when it rubbed me a little the wrong way, but I suspect that might be intentional, part of the longer game. Phil is a hero who needs work. Forte projects an innate normality, an averageness and equanimity, that keeps his characters companionable, even at their most extravagant, astringent or abnormal.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    If the characters are not particularly original, neither do they come off as artificial. The dialogue is 75% banter, but it is crisp and tart, and the actors make even the ripostes you can predict sound spontaneous.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Once you accept that you are in for a certain kind of joke repeated over and over again — or three kinds of jokes, if you include those regarding the deterioration of mind and body and those about kids these days — and settle in to the show's rhythms, you find yourself, paradoxically, laughing more easily.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Despite its troublesome subject, the series succeeds, moderately, in letting you know that it knows that Bond, as his creator conceived him, is a relic, and that Fleming's pulp-novel aspirations are worth skewering.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The flavor is high-style retro-modern, high-style B-picture.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The show is exceptionally well made from top to bottom and pulls you in and pulls you along, owing not least to a host of terrific performances.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    After a relatively overstated first episode (relative to what follows, that is, not to cartoons as a whole), it settles down into a gentler, more delicate, behind-the-beat groove.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Viewers sad about the end of "Happy Town" and looking for another creepy municipal drama filmed in Canada may find this a port in the storm, though it is more cheaply appointed and less spectacularly cast. Still, it would be pointless to attack the show for not achieving things that are beyond its ambitions.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Unlike many series--especially cable series--and despite the propensity of some family members to take undue advantage of Cam's new good fortune, the show is not broadly cynical about people or institutions, which makes it easy to like, despite its sometimes wobbly tone and occasional clumsy construction.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It's perhaps appropriate to the subject matter that the show's main appeal is sensual rather than cerebral, grounded in a host of superb performances.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It is nothing new, but it is well assembled and expertly played.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    What makes the show worth watching are some old-fashioned character relationships; no single performance tears up the place, but together they make something interesting.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Though constructed from off-the-rack tropes and predictable dialogue, the show also keeps moving forward, causing its characters enough trouble that you feel compelled to stick around at least to see how they get out of it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    I'm not wholly convinced by the American Life on Mars.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Important Things is inconsistent--the sketches are on the whole less funny than the stand-up, but they have their moments, and the show is on the whole worthwhile.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Breaking Bad is as good as a show on this subject could possibly get, but the subject has its drawbacks. I like it, I admire it, but I can't say I enjoy it.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The production itself is sunny and conducive to a good mood. Coughlan wears well, as does Jason Priestley in the role of the fiancé she puts on hold.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The show fails only when it wants to make you feel something warm about their mission, rather than just letting you enjoy the icy suspense and snappy dialogue.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Enlightening without feeling quite essential, the sort of PBS package that seems at times designed to warm the hearts and loosen the purse strings of viewers of a certain age and income.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    He is kind of irritating.... but Passmore largely pulls it off, in part by making the character a bit daffy; he just can't help himself. And the producers surround him with jerks and dweebs and men less handsome or clever than himself to ensure that he's the person with whom we identify and whose opinions we share; the plot conveniently supports his genius.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It's at its funniest when it moves out of the studio and into the world, where Triumph does his rude-dog-on-the-street act, like a canine Billy Eichner channeling what is not yet the ghost of Don Rickles. There is something actually audacious about these bits but also genuinely fun; you're let in on the game.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    While the narrative never quite coheres into a compelling whole, there are enough independently arresting, unexpectedly moving moments to carry you through, hopping from one to the next like stones in a river, on the way to a strenuously tidy conclusion.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    If anything is liable to make "Smith" above the well-made caper show it already is, it's what might be done with the relationship between Liotta and Madsen.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The 2003 edition has the edge on the 1942 in terms of raw excitement.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The situations are stock--John Hughes wrote this playbook pretty thoroughly--and the dialogue does not exactly crackle. But it is all well-staged and believably played and at times it becomes quite lyrical and, even, moving.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Its sometimes distracting and oppressive aspirations aside, Low Winter Sun does nevertheless strike me as promising, solid at its core, powered by plausible cross-purposes. Strong and James are excellent.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    While the broad strokes tend to remind you that you're watching a fiction, the finer details are well done - the bits and pieces are satisfying, even as you note the rivets and seams that join them.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    There are well-written and well-mounted scenes and some good performances. It is not without suspense. But even at four hours, House of Saddam feels incomplete and scattered--a lessened, not a heightened reality.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It chokes a bit on its own whimsicality. But it stays on its feet.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Standard sitcom issue--yet they feel convincingly bound to each other from the start.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It's funny, but it doesn't go for big laughs so much as a mood of whimsical parody.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Fine character actors abound, playing people on the rural edges, but it's the main character and Olyphant's performance that lift the sometimes labored plot lines and carry them over the finish line.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Things get pretty wacky by the end--actually, they get wacky well before the end--but however unlikely, the proceedings are kept watchable by a cast that notably includes Ian McShane, Donald Sutherland, Rufus Sewell, and Eddie Redmayne.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It plays in many ways like a leisurely, bucolic version of "Curb," with a larger cast of characters and something like a "journey" for the main character.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    A pleasingly soapy story of beating hearts and changing times.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    A likable new Disney Channel cartoon series about twins spending a summer with their strange great-uncle in a weird little town in the Pacific Northwest.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Given that Spartacus does not stumble in what it sets out to do, one's objections to the show, if objections one has, will be moral, or simple matters of taste, to the extent that those two concerns can actually be separated.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Though the result can be obvious, even cornball, at times, the show--which is smart enough, often enough--works.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Themes from earlier Toy Story movies are also recycled, which should bother no one. Although Woody and Buzz get their screen time--with Jessie, they are the "Jules et Jim" of computer-animated cartoons about sentient playthings--it is the plucky cowgirl, facing her fears, whose story this is.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Jefferies' comedy is by turn smart, obvious, thoughtful and irritating, and quite as much may be said of his series--though his stage demeanor (loud, brash and in control) is softened considerably here by dint of his being a character living among other characters.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It benefits immensely from the presence of Braugher, at long last in a role that, like that of Det. Frank Pembleton on "Homicide: Life on the Street," suits his particular intensity.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    There are moments that require you not to think too hard, and some of the black humor doesn't overcome its fundamental nastiness. But on the whole, it's a superior package, intelligently constructed and handsomely executed.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It has a kind of sunny charm, a premise fit for a novel, and is built upon a pair of strong female leads, a rare enough thing in sitcoms. Poehler and Jones have a nice, contrapuntal rhythm. I stamp this show: approved.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Like the women in it, the show is solid and professional and holds together well.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Although predictable in predictable ways, there are enough twists and turns and, relatively speaking, complexities of character to keep things interesting, and a pivot at the end that I did not see coming. Which bodes well.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Clearly flung at the Spike's male demo–-"Get More Action" is the network tagline, which implies a viewership not getting as much as it would like--it has a slightly sour edge that some will just read as The Way Things Are.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The cast is excellent, and there's potential here, even though tonight's opening episode, as pilots will, tries a little too hard.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The pilot works a little hard--not one but two characters get catchphrases, which happily evaporate by the second episode--but plenty of good things come out in the effort, and better things seem likely to come.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The mechanics of the cases (again, par for the genre) might squeak or grind here or there, but Backstrom really stumbles only when it strains too hard for seriousness--and it is not a fatal fall, in any case.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The premiere felt a little tense; the host is still learning how to relate to the camera, how to occupy television. Nevertheless, he proves a friendly presence.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Its pleasures are simple and familiar. There is the usual mix of boastful losers and shy winners, of tiresome cutting remarks and delightful delighted approval.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The Address is ragged and homely; it feels homemade, even amateurish at times.... But it is full of life and feeling; its rawness suits the subject, and helps rather than hinders Burns' cause.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    If nothing here screams New Dylan or Next Gaga, or bids in any way to rival the best of "Runway" or "Chef," the craft-under-pressure and problem-solving elements work as before. It's amazing what people can do in a day.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    While supercool science may be the hook, the real draw of Eleventh Hour is Sewell.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    With a little tweaking, the series just as easily could be set in some large corporation, or on a college campus, and engage most of the same interpersonal issues — what women do for men and for one another.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Fortunately, Gamble and Hoggart can be quite funny in their pretended confusion. Their strategies are sometimes too obvious, but often the humor takes a nicely absurdist turn.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The cartoon show is the least of his series, but it is generally amusing and pretty to watch, and I like the way it rambles.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Hall is out of practice himself but has already proved himself good at this job, and he remains likable.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It is loud and manipulative and ugly to behold, but it isn't dull.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Pretty Little Liars managed to find an organic groove, and there's reason to think this close cousin can also find its feet and walk.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Both as twisty mystery and armchair vacation, it's a good way to pass a summer night.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    There are people in this world who find flatulence mightily entertaining, and they should be happy here.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    [Jason Isaacs] is not the only reason to recommend it, but it is by itself sufficient; indeed, it overwhelms any small arguments in its disfavor.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The first episode is the weakest of the three I've seen, with some good moments but too couched in the nominal premise of struggling performers trying to make it in show business. The sex humor feels similarly conventional. Things quickly improve, however, as the women get stranger and more idiosyncratic.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The show is aspirational and at times genuinely exciting.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Like all authorized biographies, it does tend to plead its subject's case, and though it is not by any means a scrubbed version of the life, Gibney's take is sympathetic.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    There is some hokum in the pilot, including the odd B-movie line ("This could be a very important scientific site") and the red glowing eyes that ever signify evil. But it is smartly assembled--Stephen Williams, who directed 26 episodes of "Lost," made the good-looking pilot--and there may be enough gas in these characters to get them somewhere interesting.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    This is not one of those emotional journeys in which the teller comes finally to forgive herself and the world and we get out our handkerchiefs. Craziness is Fisher's baseline--Wishful Drinking begins and ends before the image of a padded cell--and clarity the thing she buys with comedy. Life will kill you, she seems to say: You might as well laugh.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    As redeveloped by Cynthia Cidre (the 2007 CBS prime-time soap "Cane"), it is very much its [the original "Dallas"] heir, in spirit and execution.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Generation Kill tends to play as a series of discrete events. I suppose an argument might be made that this mirrors the way that the constant threat of extinction, and subject always to a sudden change in (rarely explained) orders, makes one live in the moment. I don't think that was what the producers intended, but it works well enough for watching it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    I would encourage you to keep watching "Mozart in the Jungle" ... past its so-so, sometimes off-putting pilot. It gets good thereafter — very good.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The new series, to judge by the two opening hours, is better balanced and plays more to the players' strengths.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Copper has come to entertain, not to educate, and it discharges that duty well.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    You could resist it, really, as you should be able to resist all television, unless you have been completely assimilated into the matrix. But you'd be missing some sparky fun. Submit.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The show is indeed diverting. Nothing surprising, but pretty consistently interesting and as easy to watch as any invented procedural.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    In a world without cable dramas, Chicago Fire would be considered television at its more compelling and realistic. As it is, it walks the line between shameless entertainment--hot guys, hot girls, the fires within, the fires without--and intelligent storytelling.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It is tonally odd yet quite likable.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Wilmore was off to a good start Monday night--a little muted, which is his style anyway, and a little tentative, as would be expected. But he landed some punches and clearly had more than a little fun.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Once you get past the relatively stiff opening episode and everyone relaxes and starts having fun, "Hustle" is an undemanding good time that manages to rack your nerves even when you know better.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    If it doesn't match "Battlestar" for ambition or poetry or sparkling dialogue--to judge by the three hours available for review--it's well-made, solidly scary and disturbing all the same.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The script can seem both a little precious and a little obvious at times, dropping references to Pandora's box, the golem, Einstein's definition of insanity and Schrödinger's cat. But all in all, it works.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The closer you are to living with an addict or an addiction, the more essential you'll find this viewing, obviously, but the less personally involved will still find much of scientific and human interest.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The premiere is nonetheless diverting, if not immediately impressive, and there are nice rhythms and sharp asides and some other things to be said in its favor: It's a show about the working class - or perhaps better put, the barely surviving entrepreneurial class - that is actually about work.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Whether all, or indeed any, of the subjects here are actually "iconoclasts" is debatable -- "independent" is more like it -- but the title is meant to signal that this is something hipper and smarter and less conventionally angled than a Barbara Walters special and, at least on the basis of the two episodes available for review, it is.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Eventually the mood relaxes, even as the slapstick amps up, and what may prove to be a charming comedy begins to emerge.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It is so well-assembled and well-played that its contrivances and clichés play like something reasonably close to life.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The series is at its most convincing, and most beautiful, at its most static. When the show bursts into action, or insists upon making its characters intense and extraordinary--some of them fictionally take credit for real-world medical advances and inventions--it grows, paradoxically, proportionally less interesting.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    I recommend the series, though Sunday's opening film, "Sidetracked," does present a bit of a stumbling block.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    In most other respects, it is a standard three-camera sitcom, in which two bickering siblings in their mid-30s (Mitchell and Strahan) find themselves back living with their parents (Weathers and Pounder). Which is not to call it run-of-the-mill--it has some charm and personality and keeps its focus unusually tight on the four principals.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It is often fun, even when it is not funny.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The show's attitudinal mix of the jaded and amazed, the shocked and amused, is supported by the production itself.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It's in that "perhaps" and "possibly" that Ashes to Ashes finds a way forward, and although it's not as good as the original, it pushes many of the same buttons and sews on a few new ones. It's quite enjoyable.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The comedy offsets (and benefits from) both Spader's innate creepiness and Shatner's innate hamminess, and it is where producer David E. Kelley's own talents lie.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    There's much here to suggest that, if everyone relaxes a little, good things will come.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Without making any great claims for the show's depth, I do sense a desire behind the sensation and soap to investigate something significant, if deceptively simple: how life changes in a moment.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Even the most concocted bits play out in a relaxed way, as when a drummer lay back behind the beat, putting new life into an old tune, making the corn convincing, the familiar unpredictable.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    I rather enjoyed the pilot. Perhaps it's a Canadian thing, but like "Flashpoint," Rookie Blue doesn't oversell itself. It is modest and plain in a way that makes even its less likely moments feel credible enough.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Made with ingenuity and verve, it substitutes the half-glimpsed and suggestive for the in-your-face and explicit, and concentrates more on the buildup than the payoff, the fear more than the fright.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    There is something satisfying about watching difficult things performed well, especially when the point is to make it look easy, and especially when the performer is a person who might reasonably be expected to fail.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    As these things go, The Job is rather mild-mannered and amiable--everyone is on their best behavior, because there is no advantage in being nasty.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    As at the Friars, the humor gets low at times, but the characters themselves do not; which is not to say that they keep their dignity. The conversation is long on riffing and syntactically comical constructions.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    The personal circus, while given much play, remains secondary to the cooking contest. And as usual, the crop of contestants is claimed to be the most talented yet, and they do seem well-credentialed (James Beard nominees, Michelin-star-winner), competitive and more than usually tattooed.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Though it is not exactly in the spirit of the original, it should satisfy any "Boy" fans eager to see it.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    "Blade: The Series" is pretty good, really, as these things go.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    Hosted by plus-size supermodel Emme, More to Love adds an extra layer of pathos to the genre's usual Harlequin hearts and flowers, its candlelit rooms, poolside chats and painfully drawn out ritual eliminations.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    It is nice for actors to play long scenes full of words for them to say--a serious conversation in a television show might last all of six lines--and though the story feels improbable at some times and obvious at others, it can be fun just to watch them work out, flexing their Chicago Irish accents.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    This is a modest production that nevertheless generates a good bit of energy and benefits from sympathetic casting, decent dialogue and keeping things ambiguous.
    • Los Angeles Times

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