For 100 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Robert Rorke's Scores

Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Olive Kitteridge
Lowest review score: 25 Disjointed: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 81 out of 100
  2. Negative: 4 out of 100
100 tv reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Robert Rorke
    One of the many excellent things about Downton Abbey is the variety of rich female characters creator Fellowes has fashioned.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Robert Rorke
    With her pitiless, clear-eyed gaze, McDormand is a marvel as Olive, capturing not only the character’s indomitable spirit but her fears as Olive’s world begins to crumble.... The film, directed by Lisa Chodolenko, recalls those ’70s films like “A Woman Under the Influence” and “Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore” that weren’t afraid to take the full measure of a woman’s life.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Robert Rorke
    This is a 12-week 24, so loyal fans can expect twice the action in half the time. You won’t want to miss a minute.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Robert Rorke
    The first two episodes--which track the night of the June 12, 1994, murders and the day after--are the best of the six (out of 10 total) available to reviewers.... A first-rate cast makes the procedure [the trial] seem as dramatic as possible.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Robert Rorke
    The Missing is a mystery that affects a family as well as community. In a season short on promising shows, this one should be at the top of your list.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Robert Rorke
    Orange Is the New Black is a cultural phenomenon and worthy crowd-pleaser--and is the one series everyone should watch this summer.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Robert Rorke
    Hamm--never a showboater like some of those guys who keep winning Emmys--does some of the finest acting he’s ever done in the series. It’s subtle and sublime. The rest of the cast is in top form.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Robert Rorke
    Feud gives you the glamour and grit of old Hollywood and the joy of watching Sarandon and Lange duke it out in their best roles in years. The supporting cast--Tucci, Molina and Davis--is sublime.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Robert Rorke
    Those too young to remember will be enthralled with the show’s energy and talent--and with Luhrmann’s drive to resurrect a lost world and make it beautiful again.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Robert Rorke
    The contrast between the laid-back romanticism of the West Coast and the formality of New York is palpable in scene after scene.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Robert Rorke
    An affectionate and intimate documentary produced and directed by Alexis Bloom and Fisher Stevens, gives a more balanced view of one of show business’s famous mother-daughter duos.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Robert Rorke
    Sinatra: All or Nothing at All is a fascinating look at a man who wielded a lot power--obviously too much--but whose artistic legacy thankfully will prevail over his baser interests.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Robert Rorke
    Spacey plays Underwood with his usual unctuous aplomb, and Claire’s crazy controlled persona is on full display, but with private moments of longing and neediness that are wonderful to behold.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Robert Rorke
    The Affair is told from two points of view, Noah’s and then Alison’s, and memory being the imperfect mechanism that it is, their versions of the story don’t match, in tantalizing ways.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Robert Rorke
    The third-season premiere [of] Homeland delivers a strong episode that repairs much of the damage done last season to this excellent show.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Robert Rorke
    Catching Escobar then becomes an exciting and suspenseful story arc, and makes Narcos the first cool show of the new season.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    [An] intensive and exhaustive new documentary series by Ken Burns bowing Sunday night on PBS.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    Giamatti has one of his best roles as Rhoades, a kinky avenger who will not compromise his principles even if it means sending a widower with two children to prison. At first, Lewis seems miscast as Axelrod. We really do not believe that he’s the guy who grew up in The Bronx, and his presence begs the question whether any New York-born actors were considered for the role. Still, Lewis is such a good actor, with a sleek, flinty edge that gives him a believable authority.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    Even when the production is heavy-handed, the cast, led by Timothy Hutton and Felicity Huffman, contributes enough good performances to make the story worth watching.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    Public Morals gets better as the activities of the Irish Mob become more ominous and the show represents an overall advance for TNT.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    The twists and turns on Making a Murderer are so crazy and real that the series stands on its own.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    Breslin does a credible job with the role of Baby. ... The film tries to make a star out of him [Colt Prattes], and if that doesn’t quite happen, it nevertheless succeeds at showing the hidden talents of some of the medium’s most durable stars.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    [Lange and Bates] are the only reason to watch.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    Rhys Meyers already has his fans, but he’s likely to win over skeptics as this new Dracula makes a seduction out of death.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    Like the Carringtons on “Dynasty” and the Ewings on “Dallas,” the Lyons play dirty and fight dirty. How far they go to control their musical Empire should be fun to watch. As long as Cookie’s the underdog, this show will have plenty of bite.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    Victoria doesn’t have the panache or sweeping majesty of that show ["The Crown"], but it will keep house-bound New Yorkers entertained all winter long.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    Drug cartels, a room of shrink-wrapped bills (worth $60 million), body bags and buckets of blood are just some of the intriguing elements in this uniquely Mexican-American drama, where the layers of corruption on both sides of the border seem impenetrable.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    The new movie achieves its greatest power as a character study.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    These rather didactic scenes [of meetings] contrast with more relatable ones that detail the lives of Yonkers’ disenfranchised minority citizens, whom you know will clash with their white counterparts. Isaac receives excellent support from a large cast.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    The Levys nicely develop their fish-out-of-water concept by showing how the family tries to fit in out of necessity.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    Although a little sluggishly paced, this miniseries, based on the eponymously titled book by J. Randy Taraborrelli, makes a decent attempt to show why Monroe, born Norma Jeane Mortenson, was never comfortable in her own skin.... Garner gives a surprisingly confident, spunky performance as the Monroe.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    Even though we know this is one love story that doesn’t end well, The Beginning of Everything delivers an entertaining seduction into a fabulous, bygone world.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    When Masters stops himself from punching Johnny, Sheen--who has the least showy role here--has his finest moment. The exquisite Caplan, on the other hand, is given many chances to shine, and doesn’t let any of these moments slip away.... Season 3 promises to be the show’s wildest year yet.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    Stephen Colbert made a rousing, late-night debut.... His jokes were hit and miss.... Colbert really hit his stride, though, during an interview with presidential candidate Jeb Bush.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    Fast-paced and trenchant, Shots Fired is a cynical snapshot of the American justice system in freefall.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    Allegiance takes a potentially preposterous situation and makes it provocative.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    It’s a chilling look at the rise and fall of a man whose greed knew no limits and unleashed a tide of misery.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    Sounds pretty standard, but Lear and his producers, Gloria Calderon Kellett and Mike Royce, have given Machado a full-fledged role to play. She is completely believable as a middle-class mom and nurse who is not afraid to keep her kids in line.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    Hannah’s finally growing up, and how she deals with the inevitable betrayals of people she placed too much trust in will provide Girls with a worthy season arc--and give the aspiring novelist inside the hipster some real material to come.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    It’s a good start for a series that’s already been renewed for a second season--and will have time to grow.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    Without [Escobar] there’s a gaping hole. So allow yourself to be mesmerized and appalled at one of the most outrageous true crime dramas ever filmed.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    The show’s reputation continues to attract a variety of actors you wouldn’t necessarily put in a room together. Fortunately, McGregor underplays the dual role, avoiding caricature and subtly altering his Minnesota accent to suggest Ray and Emmit have had two completely different lives.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    We already know things are going to go wrong; it’s just a tantalizing question of when and how.... In a TV season where some seriously lazy casting is hindering the new shows, [Hannah Ware is] a breath of fresh air: she’s subtle, assured and has an ethereal allure.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    Biel is excellent as Cora--her facial expressions resonate with tortured emotions--and she’s ably supported by Abbott as the bewildered Mason. ... The opening episode of The Sinner features lots of blood and some requisite (tame) nudity; if you can get past that, it promises an eventful ride over the next eight weeks.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    While the first two episodes of Top of the Lake focus on Robin’s complicated, unfortunate past, the clues in the murder story unfold very slowly--probably too slowly for American audiences--but when they finally do, the series, directed by Jane Campion (“The Piano”), picks up some steam.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    When the jokes work, they’re hilarious.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    Viewers willing to lose themselves in this rich tapestry of a bygone world will not be disappointed.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    The script, by Berlanti, Ali Adler and Andrew Kreisberg, is a by-the-numbers affair that offers the character’s origin story up front, introduces the villain at just the right moment, throws in the requisite unexpected complication at the three-quarter mark and saves one twist for the final moment. Yet, there are some redeeming, clever touches, primarily whenever Kara (Melissa Benoist) has a scene with Cat Grant (Calista Flockhart), her obnoxious media-mogul boss.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    Vinyl will leave you dancing to the music, but may leave you wondering why you should care.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    The Orange cast is still bringing the same freshness to their performances to which we’ve become accustomed. And that may be the one reason to stick with the series.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    More entertaining than its network stablemate “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., ” Agent Carter is a lighter, welcome addition to the ranks of TV’s kick-ass women, from Kalinda Sharma on “The Good Wife” to Carrie Mathison on “Homeland.”
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    The flavor of Superior Donuts might be old-fashioned--but a baker’s dozen of the sitcom might do the trick.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Robert Rorke
    Even if we know how Manson’s story eventually ends, this is one cop show that will chart a tantalizing path to that grim conclusion.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Rorke
    Scenes in the middle of the show with Samwell Tarly (John Bradley) cleaning bedpans and serving soup at the Citadel dragged. ... The show thrills when concentrating on its formidable female characters.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    When Lowe is around, AHS almost feels like a real story. In between, the show serves as an excuse to show off production designer Mark Worthington’s stunning sets and scantily clad--and unclad--male actors.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    Game of Silence is not going to win any Emmys, but the murder-mystery at the show’s center is sufficiently intriguing to make you want to see the grown-up boys vindicated.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    The glacial pacing prevents any intrigue from building. Despite these drawbacks, the lovely Naomi Watts is able to bring subtle shading (and a great American accent) to the role as Jean’s professionalism is compromised by unconscious motives. It’s too bad the writers haven’t given her better material.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    Taboo is a BBC import and the first few hours are big on atmosphere and setting, but the story is a little too plodding and murky for its own good.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    The show’s reach may exceed its grasp, but the cast succeeds in selling a farfetched premise.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    If you’re not already a fan of the story, Constantine has some kinks to iron out before the unenlightened will willingly follow this master of the dark arts.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    The Red Tent would have benefited from more subtlety--hardly Lifetime’s stock-in-trade. Still, it is a major step up from the network’s usual fare of films.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    Having established the exaggerated and predictable weirdness of all white people, Fresh Off the Boat seems to have run through its one topic--and one joke.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    The Royals wants to shock but can’t, since the world it describes is something we know all too well from tabloid headlines about the real British royals. These characters are bored by their own jaded lives--and so are we.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    Designated Survivor does a decent job of mapping the confusion felt by Kirkman, his wife and various White House stock figures, but with “Madam Secretary” playing in the same faux political sandbox, the show feels a little too familiar.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    It’s more fun to watch the D-list celebs make cameo appearances than actually listen to the movie.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    The scenes between Liotta and Lopez provide a two-fold tension, as you can see Harlee become unhinged and Lopez quiver in the company of a more talented performer.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    Texas Rising doesn’t have the urgency of “Hatfields vs. McCoys,” but Texas enthusiasts will enjoy the blow-by-blow reenactments of a crucial period in American history.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    With his ever-present smile, he projects a genial, almost mild camera presence but lacks anything resembling the kind of edge that made Jon Stewart a name to be reckoned with. He has a hard road ahead of him.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    If the writers can stop laying it on so thick, maybe Walsh will find her way into the role and Bad Judge will have a better shot at entertaining and shocking us.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    When C.C. and Whitney predictably fight over the same man, your eyes may roll. And that’s a good reflex. While you may not mind revisiting “Beaches,” you may not feel the same emotions washing over you--because you already know the story.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    Ed Harris, picking up where Yul Brynner left off in the film, cuts a menacing figure as the Man in Black, a killing machine determined to find a maze that may lead him out of the park. In between these golden nuggets are meandering scenes that take a long time to acclimate park visitors (Jimmi Simpson, Ben Barnes) to the repertoire of narratives on display.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    Fans of this genre of horror storytelling will probably hang in there, unless things get too ridiculous.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    Maybe Legends will get better, but if TNT expects Bean to carry this show, they’re going to have to give him better villains and better back-up support.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    With only one episode available for review, it’s impossible to determine if Rush Hour is hampered by its need to set up contrasts between the lawmen and solve a crime. Maybe things get better.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    While the target audience will probably dig the extensive action sequences and vivid violence, there’s no reason anyone else should be “Taken” for a ride.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    Divorce casts Parker in an unsympathetic role. It’s not Parker’s comfort zone.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    If True Detective is going to be more than a vehicle for eclipsed stars trying to reignite their careers, Pizzolatto & Co. will have to dig deeper for a story that entertains--and impresses us as definitively as its predecessor.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    How to Get Away with Murder is no “Good Wife” in the sophistication (or writing) departments, and when key turning points in the case involve witnesses who are color blind, you just want to Skype with Jessica Fletcher from “Murder, She Wrote” to wrap this one up.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    Like a lot of junk food, Sharknado might taste good while you’re eating it--but even with Cheetos you have to know when to take your hand out of the bowl.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    Without a great authoritative figure to lift the entire piece to a mythic level, The Son may have been better off in book form--where readers can imagine the Texas described in its pages.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Robert Rorke
    The Middle East of Gordon’s Tyrant is as explosive as on “24” and “Homeland,” but he’s much better at letting the special effects guys manufacture the blasts than he is at creating those moments with his characters.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Rorke
    The stories will likely prove too confusing to viewers who have never seen the series and don’t have the time to play catch-up. Much of the two episodes were slow-going and the Buckhorn scenes, while striving for the quirky humor Noah Hawley has perfected on FX’s “Fargo,” weren’t weird enough.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Rorke
    A familiar, by-the-numbers procedural, where grave medical conditions bring out the best in people--and the emergency room pandemonium rolls off everyone’s back. It’s the anti-“Grey’s Anatomy” doctor show.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Rorke
    The story--while it may have been fun to read on paper--is slight and even puzzling on screen.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Rorke
    While the filmmakers behind the Parton Christmas franchise (among them veteran daytime soap writer Pamela K. Long) have sprinkled some genuine moments in the story and made a great hire in casting Nettles as the tenacious Parton matriarch, they have inadvertently made their subject, the charismatic singer herself, into someone whose life you’d rather not hear about anymore.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Rorke
    Grace and Frankie strains very hard for laughter of any sort.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Rorke
    These two criminals are supposed to have chemistry so we need another scene to set that up. Good Behavior, based on a series of novels by Blake Crouch (“Wayward Pines”), has some very awkward moments like these. The series also saddles Letty with way too much baggage, requisite for any “flawed” TV character.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Rorke
    This latest production is not completely terrible; it just underscores the sad state of affairs on network television, where programmers are seriously hurting for a fresh idea.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Rorke
    The opening and closing remarks provided by Fellowes for each episode betray more wit than he was able to evince in the scripts.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Rorke
    Besides its lackluster execution, the film has a certain cobwebby quality.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Rorke
    The humorless Young Pope doesn’t exactly crackle as a backstage political drama. Many of the scenes seem stagey, with actors gliding in and out of large rooms to be received at a wooden desk.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Rorke
    There are some welcome familiar faces here including Ernie Hudson, but they don’t have much to do. Martinez adds a note of grace as the single mom/cop Murphy, but if producers were hoping to establish some sexual chemistry between her and Kirk, they better hop to it and turn the show into a crime comedy like “Burn Notice.”
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Rorke
    Television has a rich tradition of wacky wife/reasonable husband comedies, from “I Love Lucy” to more contemporary examples such as “Will & Grace” (a platonic rom-com) “Dharma & Greg” to the relationship between Gloria (Sofia Vergara) and Jay (Ed O’Neill) on “Modern Family.” Sorry to say, Marry Me is not yet in this company.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Rorke
    History fans will scoff at this rendition of a famous story and the target audience won’t give a royal tweet about it.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Rorke
    The comedy doesn’t take off as it might have were it not trying too hard to be a family comedy.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Rorke
    [Octavia Spencer is] cast as the one-note, wise-cracking Nurse Jackson--who works alongside Dr. Jack McAndrew (David Annable)--her talents are largely wasted in a role that’s seriously underwritten.... The feelgood message of this show is so relentlessly upbeat--like the music that nearly drowns out every scene.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 37 Robert Rorke
    A witless collection of offensive anti-Catholic cliches, the new ABC series takes a talented cast and saddles it with some of the worst material in ages.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 30 Robert Rorke
    Ain’t much [Collette] can’t do, so when she temporarily foils Carlisle, we have a pretty good idea who’s going to keep the tables turned on this show.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 25 Robert Rorke
    Lorre and Javerbaum disguise Disjointed’s monotonous humor with an intrusive laugh track and cutaway spoofs of TV commercials for potato chips and Marlboros that are funnier than the jokes delivered by Bates and company.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 25 Robert Rorke
    Diehard fans may be more tolerant and overlook the bad acting and the stupid story, if only to obsess about another end-of-the-world, sci-fi scenario. The rest of us will realize that Wayward Pines has run amok and will change the channel.

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