For 93 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 25% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 74% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 14.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Robert Wilonsky's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 45
Highest review score: 100 Road to Perdition
Lowest review score: 0 Mr. Deeds
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 28 out of 93
  2. Negative: 36 out of 93
93 movie reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Robert Wilonsky
    It's the most uplifting movie of a numbing year -- a feel-good film full of songs about feeling god-awful.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Robert Wilonsky
    As giddy and antic as any great Warner Bros. cartoon of the 1930s and '40s -- it bears seeing more than once, if only to allow for the sight gags that play second fiddle to the plot, a rarity in animation -- but also resonant and real. In other words, it's the perfect movie.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Robert Wilonsky
    This movie would be worth feting in any season. It's wrenching but never manipulative, stoic but never dull, exhausting but never wearying.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Wilonsky
    As he did in "Shaun of the Dead" and "Hot Fuzz", Wright immerses his heroes in pop culture's detritus and diversions, but doesn't drown them in it. You don't have to be dazzled or tickled by the movie, or get every joke, to be touched by it, too.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Wilonsky
    It really happened, it's really corny, and it's really great.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Wilonsky
    That's all Full Frontal is: a brilliant gag at the expense of those who paid for it and those who pay to see it.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Wilonsky
    The film is a whirlwind blur, a kinetic thrill ride through the industrial backwater that was one of punk and post-punk's most fertile Promised Lands: Manchester.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Wilonsky
    De Sica's 1952 neorealist masterpiece; it's a stark snapshot in which all is revealed about the "daily life of mankind," as the director once offered by way of description.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Wilonsky
    It's a wise and powerful tale of race and culture forcefully told, with superb performances throughout.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Robert Wilonsky
    It's everything most movies this year have not been: deeply felt, genuine, gracious.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Wilonsky
    It succeeds where its recent predecessor miserably fails because it demands that you suffer the dreadfulness of war from both sides. That might not make it a milestone, but it's a hell of an improvement.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Wilonsky
    Scorsese's rockudrama withstands big-screen scrutiny some 24 years after its initial release.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Wilonsky
    Delightful almost in spite of itself.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Wilonsky
    Hard to watch, harder still to ignore.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Wilonsky
    Signs blessedly displays a sense of giddy dark humor absent from Shyamalan's previous outings. It appears for much of the film he's merely having fun with the genre, goofing on its paranoid roots.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Wilonsky
    If Dubus' work always resembled some sort of literary therapy session, as has often been said, then Field's version requires grief counseling. It is, at times, that devastating.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Wilonsky
    Perhaps the most remarkable aspect of About a Boy is how substantial it plays -- as a feel-good film with weight, a knowing comedy with dramatic depth.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Wilonsky
    Not only an exceptional thriller, but a transcendent summer movie: It assumes, for two hours, you've brain and heart enough to stick with a film that doesn't condescend, doesn't beat you up and doesn't dumb you to death.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Wilonsky
    Audiard keeps things shaky, grim, claustrophobic, doomed. His film has the feel of documentary, as he follows Clara through the daily grind that pulverizes her. We're in her head, literally.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Wilonsky
    As stirring as it is slight, as effective as it is familiar.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Wilonsky
    Here it is -- another double cross for which you will, and should, hand over your few grubby bucks.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Wilonsky
    Perfectly acceptable, deliriously charming...a goofy Bmovie dolled up like a square-jawed A-list blockbuster.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Wilonsky
    A remarkable movie with an unsatisfying ending, which is just the point.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Wilonsky
    One expects more from writer-director Wes Anderson (and his co-scribbler, Owen Wilson) than such frivolous fun that bears no lingering effect.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Wilonsky
    It's either the world's greatest infomercial for fame (and its omnipresent companion, notoriety) or the saddest eulogy of all.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Wilonsky
    Somewhere between setup and punch line, American Pie 2 starts feeling less like a sequel and more like the second episode of a TV series, a case of fine-tuning after the pilot's been picked up by the network.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Wilonsky
    Steers' film will likely polarize the audience, which, if nothing else, gives it rare resonance; at least it makes you feel, where many similar indie efforts make you sleepy.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Wilonsky
    Can barely move during its final half hour, which is a shame, because until then it's a frenetic, engaging ride -- a huge grin, not unlike the one Tom Cruise now hides behind his grownup's braces.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Wilonsky
    The cynics will scoff and dismiss it all as manipulative, the heartstring-tugging machine on hyperdrive. But this movie isn't for them; did you not see the PG? It's a sweet, sincere, utterly affable kids' movie about how parents are all kinds of screwed up and unable to tell their kids what they want or show them how they feel.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Wilonsky
    Morrow the actor tries too -- but he's a stylish director with a steady hand and a shaky eye (the scenes from Lyle's tortured point of view are dazzling, if not a bit unsettling). It'd make one hell of a TV movie.