For 4,375 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 74% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 24% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Shrek
Lowest review score: 0 The Texas Chainsaw Massacre
Score distribution:
4375 movie reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It's one of those ageless movies, like "Casablanca" or "The Third Man," that improves with age. Some movies, even good ones, should only be seen once. When we know how they turn out, they've surrendered their mystery and appeal. Other movies can be viewed an indefinite number of times. Like great music, they improve with familiarity. It's a Wonderful Life falls in the second category.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The documentary is an uncommon meeting between Treadwell's loony idealism, and Herzog's bleak worldview.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Larry Clark's Bully calls the bluff of movies that pretend to be about murder but are really about entertainment. His film has all the sadness and shabbiness, all the mess and cruelty and thoughtless stupidity of the real thing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Putty Hill makes no statement. It looks. It looks with as much perception and sympathy as it is possible for a film to look. It is surprisingly effective.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Campbell's performance is carnal, verbally facile, physically uninhibited and charged with intelligence.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The wedding sequence... is a virtuoso stretch of filmmaking: Coppola brings his large cast onstage so artfully that we are drawn at once into the Godfather's world.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is a great act of filmmaking and acting. I don't believe I would be able to see it twice.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    In America is not unsentimental about its new arrivals (the movie has a warm heart and frankly wants to move us), but it is perceptive about the countless ways in which it is hard to be poor and a stranger in a new land.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    I liked these characters precisely because they were not designed to be likable -- or, more precisely, because they were likable in spite of being exasperating, unorganized, self-destructive and impervious to good advice.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Above all one of the most beautiful films ever made. Malick's purpose is not to tell a story of melodrama, but one of loss. His tone is elegiac. He evokes the loneliness and beauty of the limitless Texas prairie. [7 Dec. 1997]
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The trouble with Funny Girl is almost everything except Barbra Streisand. She is magnificent.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The movie is funny, but it's more than funny, it's exhilarating.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A powerful but quiet film, constructed of hidden thoughts and secret desires.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is a spellbinding enigma, and one of the damnedest films Morris has ever made.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The Band’s Visit has not provided any of the narrative payoffs we might have expected, but has provided something more valuable: An interlude involving two “enemies,” Arabs and Israelis, that shows them both as only ordinary people with ordinary hopes, lives and disappointments. It has also shown us two souls with rare beauty.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    No one is better at this kind of performance than Nicolas Cage. He's a fearless actor. He doesn't care if you think he goes over the top. If a film calls for it, he will crawl to the top hand over hand with bleeding fingernails.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is one of those rare docs, like "Hoop Dreams," where life provides a better ending than the filmmakers could have hoped for. Also like "Hoop Dreams," it's not really a sports film; it's a film that uses sport as a way to see into lives, hopes and fears.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Scorsese tells his story with the energy and pacing he's famous for, and with a wealth of little details that feel just right.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Up in the Air takes the trust people once had in their jobs and pulls out the rug. It is a film for this time.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Here is a searing film of human tragedy.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The movie is bursting with life, energy, fears, frustrations and the quick laughter of a classroom hungry for relief.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The Interrupters is based on a much-acclaimed article in the New York Times Magazine by Alex Kotlowitz, who followed a period of intense violence in Chicago. He joined with James to co-produce the film. It is difficult to imagine the effort, day after day for a year, of following this laborious, heroic and so often fruitless volunteer work.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Kristen Dunst is pitch-perfect in the title role.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It would be easy to tear the plot to shreds and catch Kramer in the act of copping out. But why? On its own terms, this film is a joy to see, an evening of superb entertainment.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Here is a rare movie that begins by telling us how it will end and is about how the hero has no idea why.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A great American film.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is one of the year's best films.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Luke is the first Newman character to understand himself well enough to tell us to shove off. He's through risking his neck to make us happy. With this film, Newman completes a cycle of five films over six years, and together they have something to say about the current status of heroism. But Cool Hand Luke does draw together threads from the earlier movies, especially Hombre, and it is a tough, honest film with backbone.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A movie you cannot turn away from; it is so pitiless and uncompromising, so filled with pathos and disregarded innocence, that it is a record of those things we pray to be delivered from.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    In its quiet, dark, claustrophobic way, this is one of the best films of the year.

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