For 4,075 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 75% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 23% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Breaking the Waves
Lowest review score: 0 Freddy Got Fingered
Score distribution:
4,075 movie reviews
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Faithfully represents Heinlein's militarism, his Big Brother state, and a value system in which the highest good is to kill a friend before the Bugs can eat him. The underlying ideas are the most interesting aspect of the film.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Is this some kind of a test? The Hangover, Part II plays like a challenge to the audience's capacity for raunchiness.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It isn't bad so much as it lacks any ambition to be more than it so obviously is.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Once you realize it's only going to be so good, you settle back and enjoy that modest degree of goodness, which is at least not badness, and besides, if you're watching Rush Hour 3, you obviously didn't have anything better to do, anyway.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The film is like a crossword puzzle. It keeps your interest until you solve it. Then it's just a worthless scrap with the spaces filled in.
    • 12 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The more you think about what really happens in Cocktail, the more you realize how empty and fabricated it really is.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Shameless wish-fulfillment, a Harlequin novel crossed with a mystic travelogue, and it mercifully reverses the life chronology of many people, which is Love Pray Eat.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Spider-Man 3 is, in short, a mess. Too many villains, too many pale plot strands, too many romantic misunderstandings, too many conversations, too many street crowds looking high into the air and shouting "oooh!" this way, then swiveling and shouting "aaah!" that way.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    All of this has a fascination, and yet Red Trousers is a jumbled and unsatisfying documentary.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I think the fault is in the screenplay, which tells a story that can be predicted almost from the opening frames. The people who wrote this movie did not bother, or dare, to give us truly individual Japanese characters; there is only one who is developed with any care.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There isn't a lot in the movie that is funny.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A pleasant but inconsequential comedy, awkward for the actors, and contrived from beginning to end.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I suppose there is a market for this sort of thing among bubblebrained adolescents of all ages, but it takes a good chase scene indeed to rouse me from the lethargy induced by dozens and dozens of essentially similar sequences.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The two leads are not inspired. Jake Gyllenhaal could make the cover of a muscle mag, but he plays Dastan as if harboring Spider-Man's doubts and insecurities. I recall Gemma Arterton as resembling a gorgeous still photo in a cosmetics ad.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    If it does nothing else, Another 48 HRS reminds us that Murphy is a big, genuine talent. Now it's time for him to make a good movie.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is simply a failure of imagination. Nobody looked at the screenplay and observed that it didn’t try hard enough, that it had no surprises, that it didn’t attempt to delight its audiences with twists and turns on the phoned-in plotline.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The storytelling is hopelessly compromised by the movie's decision to sympathize with Jeanne. We can admire someone for daring to do the audacious, or pity someone for recklessly doing something stupid, but when a character commits an act of stupid audacity, the admiration and pity cancel each other, and we are left only with the possibility of farce.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie was directed by Michael Brandt, who co-wrote the script with Derek Haas. Together they wrote a much better movie, "3:10 to Yuma." The Double doesn't approach it in terms of quality. None of it is particularly compelling.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Here is a 145-minute movie containing one (1) line of truly witty dialogue: "Her 40s is the last age at which a bride can be photographed without the unintended Diane Arbus subtext."
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Jet Lag is sort of a grown-up version of "Before Sunrise"...The difference between the two films is sort of depressing.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I enjoyed Ashes of Time Redux, up to a point. It's great-looking, and the characters all know what they would, although we do not.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The actors are better than the material.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Here is a great story born to be creepy, and the movie churns through it like a road company production. If the first three movies served as parables for their times, this one keeps shooting off parable rockets that fizzle out.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Consider for a moment how this movie might play if it took itself seriously. Would it be better than as a comedy? I suspect so.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie itself is good and shows promise, except for the ending, when Trier shouldn't have been so poetic. Not only does Reprise generate itself, it contains its own review.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The plot, in short, is underwhelming. It merely follows the reporters as the screenplay serves them the solution to their case on a silver platter. Yet curiously, Deadline flows right along.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The screenplay tries to paper over too many story elements that needed a lot more thought. This movie has been filmed and released, but it has not been finished.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Essentially an interlacing of irony and gotcha! Scenes.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    This is not the sort of movie you make it your business to see in a theater. But if you're ever surfing cable TV and come across it, you'll linger.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Here's a bad movie with hardly a bad scene. How can that be? The construction doesn't flow. The story doesn't engage. The insistent flashbacks are distracting. The plot has problems it sidesteps. Yet here is a gifted cast doing what it's asked to do. The failure is in the writing and editing.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is focused on two kinds of chemistry: of the kitchen, and of the heart. The kitchen works better.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It is a touching story, and the musicians (some over 90 years old) still have fire and grace onstage, but, man, does the style of this documentary get in the way.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    John Carpenter's Prince of Darkness gets off to an intriguing start. But then the movie loses its way.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The screenplay, by Sara Parriott and Josann McGibbon, has a good feel for female best-friend relationships, and the dialogue has life and edge to it.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    October Baby is being promoted as a Christian film, and it could have been an effective one. Rachel Hendrix is surprisingly capable in her first feature role, and Jasmine Guy is superb in her scene. Unfortunately, the film as a whole is amateurish and ungainly, can't find a consistent tone, is too long, is overladen with music that tries to paraphrase the story and is photographed with too many beauty shots that slow the progress.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie lacks the warmth and edge of the two previous features ("Walking and Talking" and "Lovely and Amazing"). It seems to be more of an idea than a story.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Any professional film editor watching this movie is going to suffer through one moment after another that begs to be ripped from the film and cut up into ukulele picks. Never mind the film editor: A lot of audiences, with all the best will in the world, are going to feel the same way.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I prefer "Life Is Beautiful," which is clearly a fantasy, to Jakob the Liar, which is just as contrived and manipulative but pretends it is not.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Disclosure contains an inspiring terrific shot of Demi Moore's cleavage in a Wonderbra, surrounded by 125 minutes of pure goofiness leading up to, and resulting from, this moment.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A pleasant, genial, good-hearted, sometimes icky comedy that's like spending a weekend with well-meaning people you don't want to see again any time real soon.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Here are people who do not allow the use of their last names, yet they cheerfully have sex in front of the camera -- and even willingly participate in scenes that make them look cruel, twisted, reckless and perhaps deranged.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Johnny Knoxville, famous for "Jackass,"...is, in fact, completely convincing and probably has a legitimate movie career ahead of him and doesn't have to stuff his underpants with dead chickens and hang upside down over alligator ponds any more.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The problem is that Winterbottom has imagined both stories and several others, and tells them in a style designed to feel as if reality has been caught on the fly.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is harmless and fitfully amusing.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    "Star Trek V" is pretty much of a mess - a movie that betrays all the signs of having gone into production at a point where the script doctoring should have begun in earnest. There is no clear line from the beginning of the movie to the end, not much danger, no characters to really care about, little suspense, uninteresting or incomprehensible villains, and a great deal of small talk and pointless dead ends. Of all of the "Star Trek" movies, this is the worst.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Either this is a tragic family or a satirical one, and the film seems uncertain which way to jump.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It's not just sad, it's brutal. There's an undercurrent of cold, detached cruelty in the way Michael uses the magical device.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Kline's Frenchman is somehow not worldly enough, and Ryan's heroine never convinces us she ever loved her fiance in the first place. A movie about this kind of material either should be about people who feel true passion or should commit itself as a comedy. Compromise is pointless.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Hal Hartley is on his way to creating a distinctive film world, and although Trust is not a successful film, you can see his vision at work, and it's intriguing.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    How much more interesting is a film like "(500) Days of Summer," which is about the complexities of life, in comparison with this one, which cheerfully cycles through the cliches.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is clearly intended for girls between the ages of 9 and 15, and for the more civilized of their brothers, and isn't of much use to anyone else.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A mild pleasure from one end to the other, but not much more. Maybe that's enough, serving as a reminder that movie comedies still can be about ordinary people and do not necessarily have to feature vulgarity as their centerpiece.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    This movie is all elbows. Nothing fits. It doesn't add up. It has some terrific free-standing scenes, but they need more to lean on.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Foster, I believe, sees right through this material and out the other side, and doesn't believe in a bit of it.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Who was Joseph Fiennes channeling when he chose this muddled tone? Obviously he was reluctant to gave a broad, inspirational performance of the kind you find in deliberately religious films.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There is nothing to complain about except the film's deadening predictability and the bland, shallow characters.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Texas Killing Fields begins along the lines of a police procedural and might have been perfectly absorbing if it had played by the rules: strict logic, attention to detail, reference to technical police work. Unfortunately, the movie often seems to stray from such discipline.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Here is a movie that ignores the Model Airplane Rule: First, make sure you have taken all of the pieces out of the box, then line them up in the order in which they will be needed. Bringing Down the House is glued together with one of the wings treated like a piece of tail.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The kind of film you can appreciate as an object, but not as a story. It's a lovingly souped-up incarnation of the film-noir look, contains well-staged and performed musical numbers, and has a lot of cigarettes, tough tootsies, bad guys and shadows. What it doesn't have is a story that pulls us along, or a hero who seems as compelling as some of the supporting characters.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Nothing heats up. The movie doesn't lead us, it simply stays in step.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Here is a film that begins with merciless comic savagery and descends into merely merciless savagery. But wow, what an opening.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    If you're a fan of Hector Lavoe and Latin music, or Lopez and Anthony, you'll want to see El Cantante for what's good in it. Otherwise, you may be disappointed. The director (Leon Ichaso) and his co-writers haven't licked a crucial question: Why do we need to see this movie and not just listen to the music?
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The plot is simple-minded and disappointing, and the chase and action scenes are pretty much routine for movies in the sci-fi CGI genre. The robots never seem to have the heft and weight of actual metallic machines, and make boring villains.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The Navajo code talkers have waited a long time to have their story told. Too bad it appears here merely as a gimmick in an action picture.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I was pleased again and again by set-ups, camera angles, lighting effects, editing rhythms and the fanciful staging of action scenes. But I never for a moment cared about the characters, and the plot was all too conveniently structured - just a guideline to the action.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A strange mutant beast, half Nickelodeon movie, half R-rated comedy. It's like kids with potty-mouth playing grownup.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Begins with promise, proceeds in fits and starts, and finally sinks into a cornball drone of greeting-card sentiment.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Clever, done with skill, yet lacking in the cerebral imagination of the best science fiction.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It's a showcase leading role for Parker Posey, who obviously has the stuff, and generates wacky charm. But the movie never pulls itself together.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Hollow Man can think of nothing more interesting to do than spy on his girlfriend and assault his neighbor.Too bad. Really too bad, because the movie is supported by some of the most intriguing special effects I've seen.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Scanners is a new horror film made with enough craft and skill that it could have been very good, if it could find a way to make us care about it.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    You can sense an impulse toward a better film, and Adrien Brody and Keira Knightley certainly take it seriously, but the time-travel whiplash effect sets in, and it becomes, as so many time travel movies do, an exercise in early entrances, late exits, futile regrets.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Watching MirrorMask, I suspected the filmmakers began with a lot of ideas about how the movie should look, but without a clue about pacing, plotting or destination.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Somehow isn't as exciting as a duel over a woman should be.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Made me feel like I was sitting in McDonald's watching some guy shout at his kids. Price of Glory gives us two hours of that behavior, and it's a miscalculation so basic that it makes the movie painful when it wants, I guess, to be touching.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It says something for Robert Downey Jr. that in a movie where a man becomes a dog, Downey creates the weirdest character.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    You hear some nostalgia, but with most of them you don't get the idea that if they had the chance they'd do it all again.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I watched the movie with interest, yes, but not emotional involvement, and my appreciation of Moore was based more on her essence than on her character.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie leaves no heartstring untugged. It even has a beloved old dog, and you know what happens to beloved old dogs in movies like this. Or if you don't, I don't have the heart to tell you.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    But what the movie lacks is a story arc to pull us through.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It's chirpy, it's bright, there are pretty locations and lots happens. This is the kind of movie that can briefly hold the attention of a cat.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A work of limitless invention, but it is invention without pattern, chasing itself around the screen without finding a plot.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It's not particularly funny to hear women described and valued exclusively in terms of their function as disposable sexual partners. A lot of Connor's dialogue is just plain sadistic and qualifies him as that part of an ass it shares with a doughnut.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It is the kind of movie one enjoys more at 8, or even 12, than at 16 and up.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    You know all those horror stories about a cigar-chomping producer who screens a movie and says they need to lose 15 minutes and shoot a new ending? Wedding Crashers needed a producer like that.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A disorganized, rambling and eccentric movie that contains some moments of truth, some moments of humor, and many moments of digression.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The screenplay carries blandness to a point beyond tedium.
    • 14 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    And above all, the film is lacking in joy. It never seems like it's fun to be Billie Frank.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There are laughs in the movie, and a lot of good feeling, but it seems more interested in its Italian stereotypes than its gay insights.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Troche's tone is so relentlessly, depressingly monotonous that the characters seem trapped in a narrow emotional range. They live out their miserable lives in one lachrymose sequence after another, and for us there is no relief.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The identical premise is used in Sidney Lumet's "Before the Devil Knows You're Dead," which is like a master class in how Allen goes wrong.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    An earnest but hopeless attempt to tell a parable about a man's search for redemption. By the end of his journey, we don't care if he finds redemption, if only he finds wakefulness.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A lot of the dialogue is intended as funny, but man, is it lame.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    If the movie is a lost cause, it may at least showcase actors who have better things ahead of them.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    (Li)'s scenes are so clearly computer-aided that his moves are about as impressive as Bugs Bunny doing the same.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Hoot has its heart in the right place, but I have been unable to locate its brain.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Plays like a tired exercise, a spy spoof with no burning desire to be that, or anything else.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    There are those who will no doubt call The Postman the worst film of the year, but it's too good-hearted for that.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    This is not the story of a fugitive trying to sneak through enemy terrain and be rescued, but of a movie character magically transported from one photo opportunity to another.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    At every moment in the movie, I was aware that Peter Sellers was Clouseau, and Steve Martin was not. I hadn't realized how thoroughly Sellers and Edwards had colonized my memory.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A witless recycling of the H.G. Wells story from 1895, with the absurdity intact but the wonderment missing.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie deserves more stars for its bottom-line craft, but all the craft in the world can't redeem its story.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It's surprising to see a director like Michael Apted and an actress like Jennifer Lopez associated with such tacky material.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    You know there's something wrong with a sex movie when the good parts are the dialogue.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Starts promisingly as an attack on modern commercialized sports, and then turns into just one more wheezy assembly-line story about slacker dudes vs. rich old guys.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It's a simple, wholesome parable, crashingly obvious, and we sit patiently while the characters and the screenplay slowly arrive at the inevitable conclusion. It needs to take some chances and surprise us.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    In Step Brothers, the language is simply showing off by talking dirty. It serves no comic function, and just sort of sits there in the air, making me cringe.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The astonishing success of the original "MiB" was partly because it was fun, partly because it was unexpected. We'd never seen anything like it, while with MiBII, we've seen something exactly like it.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A brutal, crude, witless high-tech CGI contrivance, in which no artificial technique has been overlooked, including 3-D.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Made me want to spray the screen with Lysol. This movie is shameless. It's not merely a tearjerker. It extracts tears individually by liposuction, without anesthesia.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    I am just about ready to write off movies in which people make bets about whether they will, or will not, fall in love.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie pretends to show poor black kids being bribed into literacy by Dylan and candy bars, but actually it is the crossover white audience that is being bribed with mind-candy in the form of safe words by the two Dylans.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie is silly beyond comprehension, and even if it weren't silly, it would still be beyond comprehension.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    There are few things more depressing than a weeper that doesn't make you weep.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    What possible reason was there for anyone to make Did You Hear About the Morgans? Or should I say "remake," because this movie has been made and over and over again, and oh, so much better.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    What we have here is a witless attempt to merge the "Twilight" formula with the Michael Bay formula.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It offers certain pleasures, but suffers from an inability to structure events or know when to end a shot. And it has an ending that is simply, perhaps ridiculously, incomprehensible.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A slick production of a lame script, which kills time for most of its middle half-hour. If anyone in the plot had the slightest intelligence, the story would implode.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A watered-down take on the sci-fi classic "Solaris," by Stanislaw Lem, which was made into an immeasurably better film by Andrei Tarkovsky.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It's a lot of things, but boring is not one of them. I cannot recommend the movie, but ... why the hell can't I? Just because it's godawful? What kind of reason is that for staying away from a movie? Godawful and boring, that would be a reason.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Here's a movie without an ounce of human kindness, a sour and mean-spirited enterprise so desperate to please, it tries to be a yukky comedy and a hard-boiled action picture at the same time.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Emma writes everything down and then offers helpful suggestions, although she fails to supply the most useful observation of all, which would be to observe that the entire novel is complete crap.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A film so amateurish that only the professionalism of some of the actors makes it watchable.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    When flashbacks tease us with bits of information, it has to be done well, or we feel toyed with. Here the mystery is solved by stomping in thick-soled narrative boots through the squishy marsh of contrivance.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    [Figgis] has made a thriller that thrills us only if we abandon all common sense. Of course preposterous things happen in all thrillers, but there must be at least a gesture in the direction of plausibility, or we lose patience.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    An uninspired assembly of characters and story lines that interrupt one another.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    I admire the craft involved, but the movie leaves me profoundly indifferent. After three earlier movies in the series, which have been transmuted into video games, why do we need a fourth one? Oh. I just answered my own question.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie works so hard at juggling its cliches that it fails to generate interest in its story.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Here is a story hammered together from discards at the Lunacy Factory. Attempting to find something to praise, I am reduced to this: Cage's performance is not boring.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Dead Man is a strange, slow, unrewarding movie that provides us with more time to think about its meaning than with meaning.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    If you walk out after 10 or 15 minutes, you will have seen the best parts of the film.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    One of the dirtiest-minded mainstream releases in history. It has a low opinion of men, a lower opinion of women, and the lowest opinion of the intelligence of its audience. It is obscene, foulmouthed, scatological, creepy and perverted.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The actors cast themselves adrift on the sinking vessel of this story and go down with the ship.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It takes some doing to make a Jack Black comedy that doesn't work. But Nacho Libre does it.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The events involving the big speaking competition are so labored that occasionally the twins seem to be looking back over their shoulders for the plot to catch up.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie has good special effects and suitably gruesome characters, but it's bloodless.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The Immortals is without doubt the best-looking awful movie you will ever see.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Mad Money is astonishingly casual for a movie about three service workers who steal millions from a Federal Reserve Bank. There is little suspense, no true danger; their plan is simple, the complications are few, and they don't get excited much beyond some high-fives and hugs and giggles.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The standards for comic book superhero movies have been established by "Superman," "The Dark Knight," "Spider-Man 2" and "Iron Man." In that company "Thor" is pitiful. Consider even the comparable villains (Lex Luthor, the Joker, Doc Ock and Obadiah Stane). Memories of all four come instantly to mind. Will you be thinking of Loki six minutes after this movie is over?
    • 22 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It's a shaky-cam meander through an unconvincing relationship, with detours considering the process of making the film. At 91 minutes, it seems very long.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Big Daddy should be reported to the child welfare office.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The first All Talking Killer picture. After the setup, it consists mostly of characters explaining their actions to one another.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The kind of movie Mad magazine prays for. It is so earnest, so overwrought and so wildly implausible that it begs to be parodied.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The characters are bitter and hateful, the images are nauseating, and the ending is bleak enough that when the screen fades to black it's a relief.. Videodrome, whatever its qualities, has got to be one of the least entertaining films of all time.
    • Chicago Sun-Times
    • 32 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie doesn't know how odd it seems to cut from the bloodshed in the ring to the dialogue of the supporting players, who still think they're in a comedy.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    How could director Lawrence Kasdan and writer William Goldman be responsible for a film that goes so awesomely wrong?
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Here is a film so dreary and conventional that it took an act of the will to keep me in the theater.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    There's nothing wrong with Fast Food Fast Women that a casting director and a rewrite couldn't have fixed.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Why, oh, why, was this movie necessary?
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie never takes off; it's a bright idea the filmmakers were unable to breathe life into.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    There is some dark humor in the movie, of the kind where you laugh that you may not gag.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Opens with 15 funny minutes and then goes dead in the water.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Very seriously confused in its objectives.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Is there another great modern writer so hard to translate successfully into cinema? Saul Bellow? Again, it's all in the language. The only thing Saul and Gabo have in common is the Nobel Prize. Now that's interesting.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Sanctum tells the story of a terrifying adventure in an incompetent way. Some of it is exciting, the ending is involving, and all of it is a poster child for the horrors of 3-D used badly.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    [Robin Williams] has been ill-served by a screenplay that isn't curious about what his life would really be like.
    • 5 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    This movie should have been struck by a lightning bolt.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The Perfect Sleep puts me in mind of a flywheel spinning in the void. It is all burnished brass and shining steel, perfectly balanced as it hums in its orbit; yet, because it occupies a void, it satisfies only itself and touches nothing else. Here is a movie that goes about its business without regard for an audience.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie attempts to jerk tears with one clunky device after another, in a plot that is a perfect storm of cliche and contrivance. In fact, it even contains a storm -- an imperfect one.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Its primary flaw is that it's not critical. It is a celebration of an idiotic lifestyle, and I don't think it knows it.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    At some point during the pitch meetings for D.E.B.S. someone must certainly have used the words "Charlie's Lesbians."
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Jiminy Glick needs definition if he's to work as a character. We have to sense a consistent comic personality, and we don't; Short changes gears and redefines the character whenever he needs a laugh.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The Crew is all contrivance and we don't believe a minute of it.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie is an invaluable experiment in the theory of cinema, because it demonstrates that a shot-by-shot remake is pointless; genius apparently resides between or beneath the shots, or in chemistry that cannot be timed or counted.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The photography, the dialogue, the acting, the script, the special effects and especially the props (such as a spaceship that looks like it would get a D in shop class) are all deliberately bad in the way that such films were bad when they were REALLY being made.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Walks like a thriller and talks like a thriller, but it squawks like a turkey.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Blindness is one of the most unpleasant, not to say unendurable, films I've ever seen.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    If Flashdance had spent just a little more effort getting to know the heroine of its story, and a little less time trying to rip off "Saturday Night Fever," it might have been a much better film.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A deplorable film with this message: If you're a 14-year-old girl who has been brutally raped and murdered by a serial killer, you have a lot to look forward to.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Did you (Garry Marshall) deliberately assemble this movie from off-the-shelf parts or did it just happen that way? The film is like a homage to the cliches and obligatory stereotypes of its genre.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Bored out of my mind during this spectacle, I found my attention wandering to the subject of physics.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A film overgrown with so many directorial flourishes that the heroes need machetes to hack their way to within view of the audience.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Boring, repetitive and maddening about a subject you'd think would be fairly interesting: snowboarding down a mountain.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The Awakening looks great but never develops a plot with enough clarity to engage us, and the solution to the mystery is I am afraid disappointingly standard.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It's got cheesy special effects, a muddy visual look, and characters who say obvious things in obvious ways.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The kind of movie that would be so bad it's good, except it's not bad enough to be good enough.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    There's not a moment in this story arc that is not predictable.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Lumbering from one expensive set piece to the next without taking the time to tell us a story that might make us care.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Nobody needed to make it, nobody needs to see it, Jackson and Levy are too successful to waste time with it. It plays less like a film than like a deal.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    I couldn't believe a moment of it, and never identified with little David.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Tells the story of a violent sociopath. Since it's about golf, that makes it a comedy.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A movie like this is harmless, I suppose, except for the celluloid that was killed in the process of its manufacture, but as an entertainment, it will send the kids tiptoeing through the multiplex to sneak into "Spider-Man 2."
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The kind of movie that somehow succeeds in moving very, very slowly even while proceeding at a breakneck pace. It cuts quickly back and forth between nothing and nothing.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Thin and unsatisfying.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    This is a surprisingly cheesy disaster epic.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    If there's anything worse than a movie hammered together out of pieces of bad screenplays, it's a movie made from the scraps of good ones.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Take Me Home Tonight must have been made with people who had a great deal of nostalgia for the 1980s, a relatively unsung decade. More power to them. The movie unfortunately gives them no dialogue expanding them into recognizable human beings.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Even with Cecil B. Demented, which fails on just about every level, you've got to hand it to him (Waters): The idea for the film is kind of inspired.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    What Raising Arizona needs more than anything else is more velocity. Here's a movie that stretches out every moment for more than it's worth, until even the moments of inspiration seem forced.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    This new Footloose is a film without wit, humor or purpose.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Feels uncomfortably stage-managed, and raises fundamental questions that it simply ignores.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Tucker's scenes finally wear us down. How can a movie allow him to be so obnoxious and make no acknowledgment that his behavior is aberrant?
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Jogs doggedly on the treadmill of comedy, working up a sweat but not getting much of anywhere.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Pretty much a mess of a movie; the acting is overwrought, the plot is too tangled to play like anything BUT a plot, and although I know you can create terrific special effects at home in the basement on your computer, the CGI work in this movie looks like it was done with a dial-up connection.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie offers brainless high-tech action without interesting dialogue, characters, motivation or texture.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    There must still be a kind of moony young adolescent girl for which this film would be enormously appealing, if television has not already exterminated the domestic example of that species.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A mess. It lacks the sharp narrative line and crisp comic-book clarity of the earlier films, and descends too easily into shapeless fight scenes that are chopped into so many cuts that they lack all form or rhythm.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The average issue of Mad magazine contains significantly smarter movie satire, because Mad goes for the vulnerable elements and Scary Movie 3 just wants to quote and kid.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    This is a repetitive, pointless exercise in genre filmmaking--the kind of movie where you distract yourself by making a list of the sources.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Prostitutes have inspired some of the most unforgettable characters in fiction. As for all of its effect on Angelina, she might as well have saved herself the wear and tear and stayed in the laundry.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The director is James Foley, who is obviously not right for this material.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Joyful Noise is an ungainly assembly of parts that don't fit, and the strange thing is that it makes no particular effort to please its target audience, which would seem to be lovers of gospel choirs.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It's the most lugubrious and soppy love story in many a moon, a step backward for director Sam Raimi after "A Simple Plan."
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Its centerpiece is 40 minutes of redundant special effects, surrounded by a love story of stunning banality.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The Fourth Kind is a pseudo-documentary like "Paranormal Activity" and "The Blair Witch Project." But unlike those two, which just forge ahead with their home video cameras, this one encumbers its flow with ceaseless reminders that it is a dramatization of real events.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It is a thriller trapped inside a pop comedy set in Japan, and gives Reno a chirpy young co-star who bounces around him like a puppy on visiting day at the drunk tank.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    If there's anything I hate more than a stupid action comedy, it's an incompetent stupid action comedy. It's not so bad it's good. It's so bad it's nothing else but bad.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Oh, did I dislike this film. It made me squirm. Its premise is lame, its plot relentlessly predictable, its characters with personalities that would distinguish picture books.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    So anyway, what happens in Life As We Know It? You'll never guess in a million years. Never.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Strange, that movies about Satan always require Catholics. You never see your Presbyterians or Episcopalians hurling down demons.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Basically just a 98-minute trailer for the autumn launch of a new series on the Cartoon Network.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Certainly better than "Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen." How so? Admittedly, it doesn't have as much cleavage. But the high-tech hardware is more fun to look at than the transforming robots, the plot is as preposterous, and although the noise is just as loud, it's more the deep bass rumbles of explosions than the ear-piercing bang of steel robots pounding on each other.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A big, ugly, ungainly device to give teenagers the impression they are seeing a movie.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Plays like a genial amateur theatrical, the kind of production where you'd like it more if you were friends with the cast. The plot is creaky, the jokes are laborious, and total implausibility is not considered the slightest problem.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A tedious exercise in style, intended as a meditation on guns and violence in America but more of a meditation on itself, the kind of meditation that invites the mind to stray.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Regaled for 50 years by the stupendous idiocy of the American version of Godzilla, audiences can now see the original Japanese version, which is equally idiotic.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Porky's is another raunchy teenage sex-and-food-fight movie.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Rubber-stamped from the same mold that has produced an inexhaustible supply of fictional Southern belles who drink too much, talk too much, think about themselves too much, try too hard to be the most unforgettable character you've ever met, and are, in general, insufferable.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Although I did not understand the story, I would have appreciated a great deal less explanation. All through the movie, characters are pausing in order to offer arcane back-stories and historical perspectives and metaphysical insights and occult orientations. They talk and talk and somehow their words do not light up any synapses in my brain.
    • 14 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Maybe there's too much talent. Every character shines with such dazzling intensity and such inexhaustible comic invention that the movie becomes tiresome, like too many clowns.
    • 14 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Dungeons & Dragons looks like they threw away the game and photographed the box it came in.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A painfully stolid movie that lumbers past emotional issues like a wrestler in a cafeteria line, putting a little of everything on his plate.
    • 6 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Bad films are easy to make, but a film as unpleasant as Baby Geniuses' achieves a kind of grandeur.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Rarely has a film centered on a character so superficial and unconvincing, played with such unrelenting sameness. I didn't hate it so much as feel sorry for it.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Robert Rodriguez has somehow misplaced his energy, his flair and his humor in this third film, which is a flat and dreary disappointment.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie is set up as a valentine to Vardalos. She should try sending herself flowers.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A closing scene, rousingly patriotic, takes place back on the football field. I think I'm beginning to understand why the Chinese were not reckoned to be a prime market for this film.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Perhaps movies are like history, and repeat themselves, first as tragedy, then as farce.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Uncle Buck attempts to tell a heart-warming story through a series of uncomfortable and unpleasant scenes; it's a tug-of-war between its ambitions and its methods.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    An innocuous family feature that's too little/too late in the fast-moving world of feature animation.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    What we basically have here is a license for the filmmakers to do whatever they want to do with the special effects, while the plot, like Wile E. Coyote, keeps running into the wall.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Movies like this demonstrate that when it comes to stupidity and vulgarity, only the best will do for our children.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    There is nothing funny about the situation in Teaching Mrs. Tingle.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The Legend of Zorro commits a lot of movie sins, but one is mortal: It turns the magnificent Elena into a nag.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It involves teenagers who have never existed, doing things no teenager has ever done, for reasons no teenager would understand. Of course, it's aimed at the teenage market.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It's nice, but it's not much of a comedy.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    You want gore, you get gore. Hatchet II plays less like a slasher movie than like the highlight reel from a slasher movie.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Obviously made with all of the best will in the world, its heart in the right place, this is a sluggish and dutiful film that plays more like a eulogy than an adventure.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    I cringed.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    I went to Crossroads expecting a glitzy bimbofest and got the bimbos but not the fest. Britney Spears' feature debut is curiously low-key and even sad.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    As for Shaquille O'Neal, given his own three wishes the next time, he should go for a script, a director and an interesting character.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The Jackal, on the other hand, impressed me with its absurdity. There was scarcely a second I could take seriously.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    I seem to be developing a rule about talking animals: They can talk if they're cartoons or Muppets, but not if they're real.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A classic species of bore: a self-referential movie with no self to refer to. One character after another, one scene after another, one cute line of dialogue after another, refers to another movie, a similar character, a contrasting image, or whatever.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The plot was an arbitrary concoction.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    "Clerks" spoke with the sure, clear voice of an original filmmaker. In Mallrats the voice is muffled, and we sense instead advice from the tired, the establishment, the timid and other familiar Hollywood executive types.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The Flower of My Secret is likely to be disappointing to Almodovar's admirers, and inexplicable to anyone else.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Everybody knew to wait for the outtakes during the closing credits, because you'd see him miss a fire escape or land wrong in the truck going under the bridge. Now the outtakes involve his use of the English language.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Joe Dirt is so obviously a construction that it is impossible to find anything human about him; he is a concept, not a person.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It's a nine days' wonder, a geek show designed to win a weekend or two at the box office and then fade from memory.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie makes two mistakes: (1) It isn't very funny, and (2) it makes the crucial error of taking its story seriously and angling for a happy ending.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A march through the swamp of recycled ugly duckling stories, with occasional pauses in the marsh of sitcom cliches and the bog of Idiot Plots.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The film is a gloomy special-effects extravaganza filled with grotesque images, generating fear and despair.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    There must be humor here somewhere.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A first draft for a movie that could have been extraordinary.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It's unnecessary in the sense that there is no good reason to go and actually see it.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A long slog through perplexities and complexities.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It is not faulty logic that derails The Hills have Eyes, however, but faulty drama. The movie is a one-trick pony.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Newsies is like warmed-over Horatio Alger, complete with such indispensable cliches as the newsboy on crutches, the little kid, and of course the hero's best pal, who has a pretty sister.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Bootmen is the story of a young dancer and his friends who revisit the cliches of countless other dance movies in order to bring forth a dance performance of clanging unloveliness.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    So unsuccessful in so many different ways that maybe the whole project was doomed.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It knows the words but not the music; while the Farrelly brothers got away with murder, The Sweetest Thing commits suicide.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    None of the action is coherent; shots and shells are fired, people and killed or not, explosions rend the air, SUVs spin aloft (the same one more than once, I think), and there is no sense of strategy.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Another one of those road comedies where Southern roots are supposed to make boring people seem colorful. If these characters were from Minneapolis or Denver, no way anyone would make a film about them.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    There's no chemistry between Deeds and Babe, but then how could there be, considering that their characters have no existence, except as the puppets in scenes of plot manipulation.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie stars Jim Carrey, who is in his pleasant mode. It would have helped if he were in his manic mode, although it's hard to get a rise out of a penguin.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie is a paid holiday for its director, Harold Becker. I say this because I know what Becker is capable of.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Plays like a collision between leftover bits and pieces of Marvel superhero stories. It can't decide what tone to strike.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Would it have been that much more difficult to make a movie in which Tom and Sarah were plausible, reasonably articulate newlyweds with the humor on their honeymoon growing out of situations we could believe? Apparently.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    If you're a fan of extreme skateboarding, motorcycling and motocross, this is the movie for you. If not, not. And even if you are, what's in the film other than what you might have seen on TV? Yes, it's in 3D, which adds nothing and dims the picture.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    To the degree that you will want to see this movie, it will be because of the surprise, and so I will say no more, except to say that the "solution," when it comes, solves little - unless there is really little to solve, which is also a possibility.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A movie that filled me with an urgent desire to see Sarah Silverman in a different movie. I liked everything about it except the writing, the direction, the editing and the lack of a parent or adult guardian.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    House of D is the kind of movie that particularly makes me cringe, because it has such a shameless desire to please; like Uriah Heep, it bows and scrapes and wipes its sweaty palm on its trouser leg, and also like Uriah Heep, it privately thinks it is superior.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Ansiedad is a smart charmer, and well-played by Cierra Ramirez, she should really be above this sort of thing - above the whole movie, really.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Stealth is an offense against taste, intelligence and the noise pollution code -- a dumbed-down "Top Gun" crossed with the HAL 9000 plot from "2001."
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A labored and sour comedy.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The kind of movie beloved by people who never go to the movies, because they are primarily interested in something else--the Civil War, for example--and think historical accuracy is a virtue instead of an attribute.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie adds up to a few good ideas and a lot of bad ones, wandering around in search of an organizing principle.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The plot risks bursting under the strain of its coincidences, as Sara and Jon fly to opposite coasts at the same time and engage in a series of Idiot Plot moves so extreme and wrongheaded that even other characters in the same scene should start shouting helpful suggestions.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    There is a kind of studied stupidity that sometimes passes as humor, and Jared Hess' Napoleon Dynamite pushes it as far as it can go.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The screenplay by Kim Barker requires Bullock to behave in an essentially disturbing way that began to wear on me. It begins as merely peculiar, moves on to miscalculation and becomes seriously annoying.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    I laughed, yes, I did, several times during Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo. That's proof, if any is required, that I still possess streaks of immaturity and vulgarity.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It is the anti-Sundance film, an exhausted wheeze of bankrupt cliches and cardboard characters, the kind of film that has no visible reason for existing, except that everybody got paid.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    An efficient delivery system for Gotcha! Moments, of which it has about 19. Audiences who want to be Gotchaed will enjoy it.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The film is a sharp disappointment to those who have been waiting for 10 years since the master's last film. The best that can be hoped is that, having made a film, Coppola has the taste again, and will go on to make many more, nothing like this.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The poster art for A Thousand Words shows Eddie Murphy with duct tape over his mouth, which as a promotional idea ranks right up there with Fred Astaire in leg irons.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    Some of these people make my skin crawl. The characters of Sex and the City 2 are flyweight bubbleheads living in a world which rarely requires three sentences in a row.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    An idiotic ode to macho horseshite (to employ an ancient Irish word). It is however distinguished by superb cinematography.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    Not only am I ill-prepared to review the movie, but I venture to guess that anyone who is not literally a member of a Scooby-Doo fan club would be equally incapable. This movie exists in a closed universe, and the rest of us are aliens. The Internet was invented so that you can find someone else's review of Scooby-Doo. Start surfing.
    • 12 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    Pants and wheezes and hurls itself exhausted across the finish line after barely 65 minutes of movie, and then follows it with 15 minutes of end credits in an attempt to clock in as a feature film.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    An agonizingly creaky movie that laboriously plods through a plot so contrived that the only thing real about it is its length.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    The characters in these movies exist in a Twilight Zone where thousands of rounds of ammunition are fired, but no one ever gets shot unless the plot requires him to.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    Monster-in-Law fails the Gene Siskel Test: "Is this film more interesting than a documentary of the same actors having lunch?"
    • 41 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    This project is dead in the water. Read the book. Better still, read "Victory."
    • 33 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    The people in this movie are dumber than a box of Tinkertoys.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    The Spirit is mannered to the point of madness. There is not a trace of human emotion in it. To call the characters cardboard is to insult a useful packing material.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    The sad thing about A Night at the Roxbury is that the characters are in a one-joke movie, and they're the joke.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    Just when it seems about to become a real corker of an adventure movie, plunges into incomprehensible action, idiotic dialogue, inexplicable motivations, causes without effects, effects without causes, and general lunacy. What a mess.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    An inept assembly of ill-matched plot points, meandering through a production that has attractive art direction (despite the immobile mouths).
    • 44 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    I recommend that Kelly keep right on cutting until he whittles it down to a ukulele pick.

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