For 4,075 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 75% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 23% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Wonder Boys
Lowest review score: 0 Chaos
Score distribution:
4,075 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The documentary shows outrageous behavior, none more so than when they and many others are directed to a nearby Navy base for refuge.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is a painful movie to watch. But it is also exhilarating, as all good movies are, because we are watching the director and actors venturing beyond any conventional idea of what a modern movie can be about. Here there is no plot, no characters to identify with, no hope.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    I am not British, was born 14 years before the subjects, and yet by now identify intensely with them, because some kinds of human experience -- teenage, work, marriage, illness are universal. You could make this series in any society.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A Bronx Tale is a very funny movie sometimes, and very touching at other times. It is filled with life and colorful characters and great lines of dialogue, and De Niro, in his debut as a director, finds the right notes as he moves from laughter to anger to tears. What's important about the film is that it's about values.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Everything about the film -- its casting, its filming, its release -- is daring and innovative.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It brings the fantastic into our everyday lives; it delights in showing us the reaction of the man on the street to Superman's latest stunt.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The Queen is a spellbinding story of opposed passions -- of Elizabeth's icy resolve to keep the royal family separate and aloof from the death of the divorced Diana, who was legally no longer a royal, and of Blair's correct reading of the public mood.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A movie that is not only ingenious and entertaining, but liberating, because we can sense the story isn't going to be twisted into conformity with some stupid formula.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The film is pitch-perfect in its decor, music, clothes, cars, language and values. It takes place during those heady years between the introduction of the Pill and the specter of AIDS, when men shaped as adolescents by Playboy in the 1950s now found some of their fantasies within reach.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The movie is as intelligent a thriller as you'll see this year.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It's enchanting and delightful in its own way, and has a good heart. It is the best animated film of recent years, the latest work by Hayao Miyazaki, the Japanese master who is a god to the Disney animators.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The most painful and heartrending portrait of jealousy in the cinema--an "Othello'' for our times.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Green takes us to that place where we keep feelings that we treasure, but are a little afraid of.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The performances are all insidiously powerful.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What is most amazing about this film is how completely Spielberg serves his story. The movie is brilliantly acted, written, directed and seen. Individual scenes are masterpieces of art direction, cinematography, special effects, crowd control.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Gomorrah looks grimy and sullen, and has no heroes, only victims. That is its power.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    More reverie and meditation than reportage.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The way Hugo deals with Melies is enchanting in itself, but the film's first half is devoted to the escapades of its young hero. In the way the film uses CGI and other techniques to create the train station and the city, the movie is breathtaking.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Philip Seymour Hoffman's precise, uncanny performance as Capote doesn't imitate the author so much as channel him, as a man whose peculiarities mask great intelligence and deep wounds.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    An endlessly fascinating movie.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A very funny, sometimes very sad documentary.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    There are moments in All or Nothing of such acute observation that we nod in understanding -- The closing scenes of the movie are just about perfect.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is not a film for most people. It is certainly for adults only. But it shows Todd Solondz as a filmmaker who deserves attention, who hears the unhappiness in the air and seeks its sources.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Max is played by Jean Gabin, named "the actor of the century" in a French poll, in Jacques Becker's Touchez Pas au Grisbi, a 1954 French crime film that uncannily points the way toward Jean-Pierre Melville's great "Bob Le Flambeur" the following year.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This movie does not describe the America I learned about in civics class, or think of when I pledge allegiance to the flag. Yet I know I will get the usual e-mails accusing me of partisanship, bias, only telling one side, etc. What is the other side? See this movie, and you tell me.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The kind of parable that encourages us to re-evaluate the good old days and take a fresh look at the new world we so easily dismiss as decadent.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    By the end of the movie, we have been through an emotional and a sensual wringer, in a film of great wisdom and delight.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The actors and the characters merge and form a reality above and apart from the story, and the result is a film that takes us beyond crime and London and the Russian mafia and into the mystifying realms of human nature.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    [An] extraordinary documentary, nothing at all like what I was expecting to see. Here is not a sick and drugged man forcing himself through grueling rehearsals, but a spirit embodied by music. Michael Jackson was something else.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Pitiless, bleak and despairing -- The Grey Zone refers to a world where everyone is covered with the gray ash of the dead, and it has been like that for so long they do not even notice anymore.

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