For 4,071 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 75% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 23% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 The Age of Innocence
Lowest review score: 0 Tomcats
Score distribution:
4,071 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    There have been many good movies about gambling, but never one that so single-mindedly shows the gambler at his task.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The performances are all insidiously powerful.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Causes us to leave the theater quite unreasonably happy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A great visionary achievement, a film so original and exciting, it stirred my imagination like "Metropolis" and "2001: A Space Odyssey."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    In its quiet, dark, claustrophobic way, this is one of the best films of the year.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The kind of movie you can see twice--first for the questions, the second time for the answers.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    There is one cool, understated scene after another.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A collision at the intersection of farce and tragedy--the apocalypse as a joke on us.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The film is pitch-perfect in its decor, music, clothes, cars, language and values. It takes place during those heady years between the introduction of the Pill and the specter of AIDS, when men shaped as adolescents by Playboy in the 1950s now found some of their fantasies within reach.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is a movie to surrender yourself to. If you require logic, see something else. Mulholland Drive works directly on the emotions, like music.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    No finer film has ever been made about organized crime - not even "The Godfather."
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Allen's writing and directing style is so strong and assured in this film that the actual filmmaking itself becomes a narrative voice.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    I enjoyed The Truman Show on its levels of comedy and drama; I liked Truman in the same way I liked Forrest Gump--because he was a good man, honest, and easy to sympathize with.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The wedding sequence... is a virtuoso stretch of filmmaking: Coppola brings his large cast onstage so artfully that we are drawn at once into the Godfather's world.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The fact that David Helfgott lived the outlines of these events--that he triumphed, that he fell, that he came slowly back--adds an enormous weight of meaning to the film.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The movie is as intelligent a thriller as you'll see this year.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Cage and Shue make these cliches into unforgettable people.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This film is such a virtuoso high-wire act, daring so much, achieving it with such grace and skill. Minority Report reminds us why we go to the movies in the first place.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Soderbergh's story, from a screenplay by Stephen Gaghan, cuts between these characters so smoothly that even a fairly complex scenario remains clear and charged with tension.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    No director since Fassbinder has been able to evoke such complex emotions with such problematic material.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is a film with a political point of view, but often its characters lose sight of that, in their fascination with each other and with the girl.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The kind of film I instinctively respond to. Leave logic at the door. Do not expect subdued taste and restraint, but instead a kind of operatic ecstasy.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Like "Citizen Kane," Pulp Fiction is constructed in such a nonlinear way that you could see it a dozen times and not be able to remember what comes next.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Breathtaking and terrifying, urgently involved with its characters, it announces a new director of great gifts and passions: Fernando Meirelles.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    One of the funniest, most intelligent, most original films.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is so rare to find a film where you become quickly, simply absorbed in the story.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Crowe brings the character to life by sidestepping sensationalism and building with small behavioral details.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    May
    The movie subtly darkens its tone until, when the horrifying ending arrives, we can see how we got there. There is a final shot that would get laughs in another kind of film, but May earns the right to it, and it works, and we understand it.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is as assured and flawless a telling of sadness and joy as I have ever seen.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    In its warmth and in its enchantment, as well as in its laughs, this is the best comedy in a long time.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    One of the most visually inventive films I have ever seen.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Spacey, an actor who embodies intelligence in his eyes and voice, is the right choice for Lester Burnham.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Not many movies know that truth. Moonlight Mile is based on it.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is not your average family cartoon. Shrek is jolly and wicked, filled with sly in-jokes and yet somehow possessing a heart.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This film embodies ideas. After the immediate experience begins to fade, the implications remain and grow.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Leconte brings his film to transcendent closure without relying on stale plot devices or the clanking of the plot. He resorts to a kind of poetry. After the film is over, you want to sigh with joy, that in this rude world such civilization is still possible.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What is most amazing about this film is how completely Spielberg serves his story. The movie is brilliantly acted, written, directed and seen. Individual scenes are masterpieces of art direction, cinematography, special effects, crowd control.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A visionary roller-coaster ride of a movie.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Either Being John Malkovich gets nominated for best picture, or the members of the Academy need portals into their brains.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Transcends its origins and becomes one of a kind. It's glorious, unashamed escapism and surprisingly touching at the same time.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Seen after 30 years, Dr. Strangelove seems remarkably fresh and undated - a clear-eyed, irreverant, dangerous satire. And its willingness to follow the situation to its logical conclusion - nuclear annihilation - has a purity that today's lily-livered happy-ending technicians would probably find a way around.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It's enchanting and delightful in its own way, and has a good heart. It is the best animated film of recent years, the latest work by Hayao Miyazaki, the Japanese master who is a god to the Disney animators.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What a bewilderingly brilliant and entertaining movie this is.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Not just a thriller, not just a social commentary, not just a comedy or a romance, but all of those in a clearly seen, brilliantly made film.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It's one of the best films of the year.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    I wanted to hug this movie. It takes such a risky journey and never steps wrong. It creates specific, original, believable, lovable characters, and meanders with them through their inconsolable days, never losing its sense of humor.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The kind of parable that encourages us to re-evaluate the good old days and take a fresh look at the new world we so easily dismiss as decadent.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    [Nicholson's] performance is key in keeping Chinatown from becoming just a genre crime picture--that, and a Robert Towne screenplay that evokes an older Los Angeles, a small city in a large desert.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Julianne Moore, Dennis Quaid and Dennis Haysbert are called on to play characters whose instincts are wholly different from their own. By succeeding, they make their characters real, instead of stereotypes.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This time the dad is the hero of the story, although in most animation it is almost always the mother.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What a magical movie.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The genius of the movie is the way is sidesteps all of the obvious cliches of the underlying story and makes itself fresh, observant, tough and genuinely moving.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    There has never been a movie quite like Northfork… The movie is visionary and elegiac, more a fable than a story, and frame by frame, it looks like a portfolio of spaces so wide, so open, that men must wonder if they have a role beneath such indifferent skies.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Lohman in particular is effective; I learn to my astonishment that she's 24, but here she plays a 15-year-old with all the tentative love and sudden vulnerability that the role requires, when your dad is a whacko confidence man.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    I loved this movie. I loved the way Coppola and her actors negotiated the hazards of romance and comedy, taking what little they needed and depending for the rest on the truth of the characters.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    To see strong acting like this is exhilarating. In a time of flashy directors who slice and dice their films in a dizzy editing rhythm, it is important to remember that films can look and listen and attentively sympathize with their characters. Directors grow great by subtracting, not adding, and Eastwood does nothing for show, everything for effect.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Kill Bill: Volume 1 shows Quentin Tarantino so effortlessly and brilliantly in command of his technique that he reminds me of a virtuoso violinist racing through "Flight of the Bumble Bee" -- or maybe an accordion prodigy setting a speed record for "Lady of Spain."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    You savor every moment of Jackie Brown. Those who say it is too long have developed cinematic attention deficit disorder. I wanted these characters to live, talk, deceive and scheme for hours and hours.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Bresson suggests that we are all Balthazars. Despite our dreams, hopes and best plans, the world will eventually do with us whatever it does.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It simply looks at the day as it unfolds, and that is a brave and radical act; it refuses to supply reasons and assign cures, so that we can close the case and move on.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Halloween is an absolutely merciless thriller...I would compare it to "Psycho."
    • Chicago Sun-Times
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Like the work of David Lean, it achieves the epic without losing sight of the human, and to see it is to be reminded of the way great action movies can rouse and exhilarate us, can affirm life instead of simply dramatizing its destruction.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Dying is not this cheerful, but we need to think it is. The Barbarian Invasions is a movie about a man who dies about as pleasantly as it's possible to imagine; the audience sheds happy tears.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    In America is not unsentimental about its new arrivals (the movie has a warm heart and frankly wants to move us), but it is perceptive about the countless ways in which it is hard to be poor and a stranger in a new land.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A quiet movie, shaken from time to time by ripples of emotional turbulence far beneath the surface.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    McNamara speaks concisely and forcibly, rarely searching for a word, and he is not reciting boilerplate and old sound bites; there is the uncanny sensation that he is thinking as he speaks.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It stands with integrity and breaks our hearts.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is one of the greatest performances in the history of the cinema.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The most harrowing movie about mountain climbing I have seen, or can imagine.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The film is extraordinarily beautiful. Bertolucci is one of the great painters of the screen.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    If I were asked to say with certainty which movies will still be widely known a century or two from now, I would list "2001,'' "The Wizard of Oz,'' Keaton and Chaplin, Astaire and Rogers, and probably "Casablanca'' ... and "Star Wars,'' for sure.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The most painful and heartrending portrait of jealousy in the cinema--an "Othello'' for our times.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is not a sermon or a homily, but a visualization of the central event in the Christian religion. Take it or leave it.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Wolfgang Petersen's direction is an exercise in pure craftsmanship. [Director's Cut]
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Like a flowering of talent that has been waiting so long to be celebrated. It is also one of the most touching and moving of the year's films.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    In the world of this film, conventional piety is overturned and we see into the soul of a human monster.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Plays like an anthology of the best parts from all the Saturday matinee serials ever made.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The patter is always fascinating, and at right angles to the action. [Mamet]'s like a magician who gets you all involved in his story about the King, the Queen and the Jack, while the whole point is that there's a rabbit in your pocket.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    LaBute's "Your Friends and Neighbors'' is to "In the Company of Men'' as Quentin Tarantino's "Pulp Fiction'' was to "Reservoir Dogs.'' In both cases, the second film reveals the full scope of the talent, and the director, given greater resources, paints what he earlier sketched.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Duvall's screenplay does what great screenwriting is supposed to do, and surprises us with additional observations and revelations in every scene.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Put the two parts together, and Tarantino has made a masterful saga that celebrates the martial arts genre while kidding it, loving it, and transcending it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Seibei's story is told by director Yoji Yamada in muted tones and colors, beautifully re-creating a feudal village that still retains its architecture, its customs, its ancient values, even as the economy is making its way of life obsolete.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The movie is made with boundless energy. Fellini stood here at the dividing point between the neorealism of his earlier films (like "La Strada") and the carnival visuals of his extravagant later ones ("Juliet of the Spirits," "Amarcord'').
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The movie is astonishingly beautiful. The cinematography is by Bergman's longtime collaborator Sven Nykvist.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Here is a movie that was made more than 25 years ago, and it feels as if it were made yesterday. Not a moment of The Manchurian Candidate lacks edge and tension and a cynical spin. [Re-release]
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What's fascinating is the way Mario, working from his father's autobiography and his own memories, has somehow used his first-hand experience without being cornered by it.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The best of three Star Wars films, and the most thought-provoking. After the space opera cheerfulness of the original film, this one plunges into darkness and even despair, and surrenders more completely to the underlying mystery of the story. It is because of the emotions stirred in Empire that the entire series takes on a mythic quality that resonates back to the first and ahead to the third. This is the heart.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The film is astonishing in the amount of material it contains. It isn't thin or superficial; there is an abundance of observation and invention here.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    One of the most effective thrillers ever made.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It's a real movie, full-blooded and smart, with qualities even for those who have no idea who Stan Lee is. It's a superhero movie for people who don't go to superhero movies, and for those who do, it's the one they've been yearning for.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This film is a wonder - the best work yet by one of our most original and independent filmmakers - and after it is over, and you begin to think about it, its meanings begin to flower.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Watching The American President, I felt respect for the craft that went into it: the flawless re-creation of the physical world of the White House, the smart and accurate dialogue, the manipulation of the love story to tug our heartstrings.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The Leopard was written by the only man who could have written it, directed by the only man who could have directed it, and stars the only man who could have played its title character.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The peculiar quality of Vanity Fair, which sets it aside from the Austen adaptations such as "Sense and Sensibility" and "Pride and Prejudice," is that it's not about very nice people. That makes them much more interesting.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    'Return of the Jedi' is fun, magnificent fun. The movie is a complete entertainment, a feast for the eyes and a delight for the fancy. It's a little amazing how Lucas and his associates keep topping themselves.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Campbell's performance is carnal, verbally facile, physically uninhibited and charged with intelligence.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    In its heedless energy and joy, it reminded me of how I felt the first time I saw "Raiders of the Lost Ark." It's like a film that escaped from the imagination directly onto the screen, without having to pass through reality along the way.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What we sense after the film is that the natural sources of pleasure have been replaced with higher-octane substitutes, which have burnt out the ability to feel joy.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is a remarkable film, immediate, urgent, angry, poetic and stubbornly hopeful.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The strength of Leigh's film is that it is not a message picture, but a deep and true portrait of these lives.