For 4,403 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 74% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 24% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 The Grifters
Lowest review score: 0 I Spit on Your Grave
Score distribution:
4403 movie reviews
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    So the movie is daring, and well-acted. Yet it isn't very satisfying, because the serious content keeps breaking through the soggy plot intended to contain it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    El Crimen Perfecto has energy, color, spirit and lively performances, but what it does not have are very many laughs.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A work of limitless invention, but it is invention without pattern, chasing itself around the screen without finding a plot.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The problem with The Baxter is right there at the center of the movie, and maybe it is unavoidable: Showalter makes too good of a baxter. He deserves to be dumped.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The screenplay creates a sense of foreboding and afterboding, but no actual boding.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The film expends enormous energy to tell a story that is tedious and contrived.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Mad City might have been more fun if it had added that extra spin--if it had attacked the audience as well as the perpetrators. As it is, it's too predictable.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A Sound of Thunder may not be a success, but it loves its audience and wants us to have a great time.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    G
    The problem with G is not merely that the ending doesn't work and feels hopelessly contrived. It's also that the plot adds too many unnecessary characters and subplots, so that the main line gets misplaced.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    But what the movie lacks is a story arc to pull us through.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Watching MirrorMask, I suspected the filmmakers began with a lot of ideas about how the movie should look, but without a clue about pacing, plotting or destination.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The problem is that Winterbottom has imagined both stories and several others, and tells them in a style designed to feel as if reality has been caught on the fly.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There is undoubtedly a movie to be made about this material -- a different movie.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie plays like the kind of line a rich older guy would lay on a teenage model,suppressing his own intelligence and irony in order to spread out before her the wonderful world he would like to give her as a gift.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    That the new Casanova lacks such wit is fatal. Heath Ledger is a good actor but Hallstrom's film is busy and unfocused, giving us the view of Casanova's ceaseless activity but not the excitement. It's a sitcom when what is wanted is comic opera.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie tells us nothing we haven't heard before.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The sex in the movie is so mild that I assumed the R rating was generated primarily by the gay theme, until I learned the R is in fact because of too many f-words.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The problem with "FD3" is since it is clear to everyone who must die and in what order, the drama is reduced to a formula in which ominous events accumulate while the teenagers remain oblivious.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Individual scenes feel authentic, but the story tries to build bridges between loose ends.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Benshis were the Japanese performers who stood next to the screen during silent films and explained the plot to the audience. If ever a benshi were needed in a modern movie, Night Watch is that film.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is awfully sweet. The young actresses playing eighth-graders look their age, for once, and have an unstudied charm.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It says something for Robert Downey Jr. that in a movie where a man becomes a dog, Downey creates the weirdest character.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    My two-star rating represents a compromise between admiration and horror.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It is enormously ambitious -- maybe too much so, since it ranges so widely between styles and strategies that it distracts from its own flow.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There are better movies opening this weekend. There are better movies opening every weekend. But Slither has a competence to it, an ability to manipulate obligatory horror scenes in a way that works.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Any professional film editor watching this movie is going to suffer through one moment after another that begs to be ripped from the film and cut up into ukulele picks. Never mind the film editor: A lot of audiences, with all the best will in the world, are going to feel the same way.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The adults at the Hotchkiss reunion are played by an assortment of splendid actors.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Too clever by half. It's the worst kind of con: It tells us it's a con, so we don't even have the consolation of being led down the garden path.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie lacks the warmth and edge of the two previous features ("Walking and Talking" and "Lovely and Amazing"). It seems to be more of an idea than a story.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A conventional film for an unconventional actor.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Projects like this bring out the best in actors, who take salary cuts to work in Chekhov (even at one remove). What we can guess, watching the film, is that the same players would make a good job of "Three Sisters" but are undermined by the faculty club, which works like a hotel lobby. There's no way to sustain dramatic momentum here.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Stick It uses the story of a gymnast's comeback attempt as a backdrop for overwrought visual effects, music videos, sitcom dialogue and general pandering. The movie seems to fear that if it pauses long enough to actually be about gymnastics, the audience will grow restless.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    RV
    There is nothing I much disliked but little to really recommend. At least the movie was not nonstop slapstick, and there were a few moments of relative gravity, in which Robin Williams demonstrated once again that he's more effective on the screen when he's serious than when he's trying to be funny.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There is nothing wrong with the performances. All of the actors are professionals, although none have as much fun as Shelley Winters, who is the actor everyone remembers from the 1972 movie.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Watching Just My Luck, I wished I were a teenage girl, not for any perverse reason but because then I might have enjoyed it a lot more.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Since the scenes where they're together are so much less convincing than the ones where they fall apart, watching the movie is like being on a double-date from hell.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It's not just sad, it's brutal. There's an undercurrent of cold, detached cruelty in the way Michael uses the magical device.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    When the hero, his alter ego, his girlfriend and the villain all seem to lack any joy in being themselves, why should we feel joy at watching them?
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Meryl Streep is indeed poised and imperious as Miranda, and Anne Hathaway is a great beauty who makes a convincing career girl. I liked Stanley Tucci, too, as Nigel... But I thought the movie should have reversed the roles played by Grenier and Baker. Grenier comes across not like the old boyfriend but like the slick New York writer, and Baker seems the embodiment of Midwestern sincerity.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The kind of movie where you walk in, watch the first 10 minutes, know exactly where it's going, and hope devoutly that you're wrong.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I have never seen anything remotely approaching the mess that the new punk version of "Romeo & Juliet" makes of Shakespeare's tragedy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Brando doesn't so much walk through this movie as coast, in a gassy, self-indulgent performance no one else could have gotten away with.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    300
    My deepest objection to the movie is that it is so blood-soaked. When dialogue arrives to interrupt the carnage, it's like the seventh-inning stretch.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is too pat and practiced to really be convincing, and the progress of Ariel's relationships with the two grumps seems dictated mostly by the needs of the screenplay. But Matthau and Lemmon are fun to see together, if for no other reason than just for the essence of their beings.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Grumpier Old Men is not terrifically compelling, although it is probably impossible not to enjoy Matthau and Lemmon acting together.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is unconvincing. At the end, Jim is seen going in through a "stage door," and then we hear him telling the story of his descent and recovery. We can't tell if this is supposed to be genuine testimony or a performance. That's the problem with the whole movie.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Kline's Frenchman is somehow not worldly enough, and Ryan's heroine never convinces us she ever loved her fiance in the first place. A movie about this kind of material either should be about people who feel true passion or should commit itself as a comedy. Compromise is pointless.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is that it's all surface and no substance. Not even the slightest attempt is made to suggest that the film takes its own story seriously. Everything is style. The performances seem deliberately angled as satire.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie tells no clear story and has no clear ideas.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Scanners is a new horror film made with enough craft and skill that it could have been very good, if it could find a way to make us care about it.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It's a rambling, unfocused biography of Wyatt Earp, starting when he's a kid and following his development from an awkward would-be lawyer into a slick gunslinger. This is a long journey, in a three-hour film that needs better pacing.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Spider-Man 3 is, in short, a mess. Too many villains, too many pale plot strands, too many romantic misunderstandings, too many conversations, too many street crowds looking high into the air and shouting "oooh!" this way, then swiveling and shouting "aaah!" that way.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie has been directed and acted so well, in fact, that almost all my questions have to do with the script: Why was the hero made so uncompromisingly hateful?
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Strongly told stories have a way of carrying their characters along with them. But here we have an undefined character in an aimless story. Too bad.
    • 13 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Fair Game works as a thriller for anyone who lives entirely in the present.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is harmless and fitfully amusing.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It's a showcase leading role for Parker Posey, who obviously has the stuff, and generates wacky charm. But the movie never pulls itself together.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I guess it's a tribute to The Man With Two Brains that I found myself laughing a fair amount of the time, despite my feelings about Martin.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The result is that we feel deliberately distanced from the film. It is not so much an exercise in style as an exercise in search of a style. The story doesn't involve us because we can't follow it, and we doubt if the characters can, either.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    As preposterous as the plot was, there was never a line of Hackman dialogue that didn't sound as if he believed it. The same can't be said, alas, for Sharon Stone, who apparently believed that if she played her character as silent, still, impassive and mysterious, we would find that interesting. More swagger might have helped.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    One fundamental problem with the movie is that John Travolta is seriously miscast as a nuclear terrorist. Say what you will about the guy, he doesn't come across as a heavy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Hal Hartley is on his way to creating a distinctive film world, and although Trust is not a successful film, you can see his vision at work, and it's intriguing.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Like many other cultural experiments (minimalist art, "Finnegan's Wake," the Chicago Tribune's new Friday section), it is more amusing to talk about than to experience.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The basic idea of Uncommon Valor is so interesting that it's all they can do to make a routine formula movie out of it. But they do.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Educating Rita, which might have been a charming human comedy, disintegrated into a forced march through a formula relationship.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Disclosure contains an inspiring terrific shot of Demi Moore's cleavage in a Wonderbra, surrounded by 125 minutes of pure goofiness leading up to, and resulting from, this moment.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The Distinguished Gentleman prefers to give us measured laughs at a leisurely pace, and then it settles for the sellout upbeat ending. Ho hum.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Far and Away is a movie that joins astonishing visual splendor with a story so simple-minded it seems intended for adolescents.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    If it does nothing else, Another 48 HRS reminds us that Murphy is a big, genuine talent. Now it's time for him to make a good movie.
    • 12 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The more you think about what really happens in Cocktail, the more you realize how empty and fabricated it really is.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    People may go to see Eddie Murphy once, twice, three or even six times in disposable movies like Harlem Nights, but if he wants to realize his potential he needs to work with a better writer and director than himself.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    All of the materials are in place for a film that might have pleased Orwell. But somehow they never come together.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It's a visually effective and often scary film to watch, but the story is so leaky that we finally just give up.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Great energy and creativity went into the construction, production and direction of this movie, but it doesn't have a story that does justice to the production.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The screenplay, by Sara Parriott and Josann McGibbon, has a good feel for female best-friend relationships, and the dialogue has life and edge to it.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The beauty of Twilight Zone -- The Movie is the same as the secret of the TV series: It takes ordinary people in ordinary situations and then (can you hear Rod Serling?) zaps them with "next stop -- the Twilight Zone!"
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Lots of sight gags and one-liners are attempted, but few of them succeed. The cast is talented but stranded in weak material.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Watching this film I reflected that there are only so many Cracker Jacks you can eat before you decide to hell with the toy.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    In the end, I'm conflicted about the film. As an accessible family film, it delivers the goods. But it lives in the shadow of "March of the Penguins." Despite its sad scenes, it sentimentalizes.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is focused on two kinds of chemistry: of the kitchen, and of the heart. The kitchen works better.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    If you're a fan of Hector Lavoe and Latin music, or Lopez and Anthony, you'll want to see El Cantante for what's good in it. Otherwise, you may be disappointed. The director (Leon Ichaso) and his co-writers haven't licked a crucial question: Why do we need to see this movie and not just listen to the music?
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The whole movie is so solemn, so worshipful toward its theme, that it's finally just silly.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Once you realize it's only going to be so good, you settle back and enjoy that modest degree of goodness, which is at least not badness, and besides, if you're watching Rush Hour 3, you obviously didn't have anything better to do, anyway.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is a first-time directorial effort by Justin Theroux, a splendid actor, son of the writer Phyllis, nephew of the novelist Paul. He might have done better to have taken on something by them.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    In The Hottest State, Hawke uses fairly standard childhood motivations for his unhappiness and reveals too little real interest in the Sara character.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    This movie, for all its noble intentions, is a bore.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Here is a great story born to be creepy, and the movie churns through it like a road company production. If the first three movies served as parables for their times, this one keeps shooting off parable rockets that fizzle out.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There seem to be two movies going on here at the same time, and December Boys would have been better off going all the way with one of them.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Everything is brought together at the end in a flash of revelation that is spectacularly underwhelming.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Benton has made better movies, but this one has no organic reality.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There are small moments of real humor.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    All of this material, written by Seinfeld and writers associated with his television series, tries hard, but never really takes off.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie leaves no heartstring untugged. It even has a beloved old dog, and you know what happens to beloved old dogs in movies like this. Or if you don't, I don't have the heart to tell you.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie wants to be good-hearted but is somehow sort of grudging. It should have gone all the way. I think Fred Claus should have been meaner if he was going to be funnier, and Santa should have been up to something nefarious, instead of the jolly old ho-ho-ho routine.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    If you have seen ads or trailers suggesting that horrible things pounce on people, and they make you think you want to see this movie, you will be correct. It is a competently made Horrible Things Pouncing on People Movie. If you think Frank Darabont has equaled the "Shawshank" and "Green Mile" track record, you will be sadly mistaken.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    About as good as a movie with these characters can probably be, and I am well aware that I am the wrong audience for this movie.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The identical premise is used in Sidney Lumet's "Before the Devil Knows You're Dead," which is like a master class in how Allen goes wrong.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie has terrific if completely unbelievable special effects. The actors had fun, I guess. You might, too, if you like goofiness like this.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Consider for a moment how this movie might play if it took itself seriously. Would it be better than as a comedy? I suspect so.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    An odd, desperate film, lost in its own audacity, and yet there are passages of surreal beauty and preposterous invention that I have to admire. The film doesn't work, and indeed seems to have no clear idea of what its job is, and yet (sigh) there is the temptation to forgive its trespasses simply because it is utterly, if pointlessly, original.

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