For 4,627 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 74% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 24% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial
Lowest review score: 0 Wolf Creek
Score distribution:
4627 movie reviews
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The basic mistake in the movie isn't in the pacing, but in the storytelling. They've made the movie about its less interesting major character.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Whoopi Goldberg is the only original or interesting thing about Jumpin' Jack Flash. And she tries, but she's not enough.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The 'Burbs tries to position itself somewhere between Beetlejuice and The Twilight Zone, but it lacks the dementia of the first and the wicked intelligence of the second and turns instead into a long shaggy dog story.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    This is a disappointing, misguided movie that has all of the parts in place to be a much better one.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The screenplay by Kaufman, Crichton and Michael Backes is not about much of anything important, and Connery's deep penetrating wisdom takes away some of the suspense: If he knows everything that's going to happen, why keep us in the dark?
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Without a great Bond girl, a great villain or a hero with a sense of humor, The Living Daylights belongs somewhere on the lower rungs of the Bond ladder. But there are some nice stunts.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    All of the cliches are in the right places, most of the gags pay off and there are moments of real amusement as the Australian cowboy wanders around Manhattan as a naive sightseer. The problem is that there's not one moment of chemistry between the two stars.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The photography is undeniably beautiful, but there comes a point when we've had too many mountains and too little plot. All that holds the movie together is the screen persona of Eastwood, who is so convincingly tight-lipped that sometimes you have the feeling he knows what's going on and just won't tell.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Battle looks like the last gap of a dying series, a movie made simply to wring the dollars out of any remaining ape fans.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There are so many different characters and story lines in the movie that it's hard to keep everything straight, and harder still to care.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Any Which Way You Can is not a very good movie, but it's hard not to feel a grudging affection for it. Where else, in the space of 115 minutes, can you find a country & western road picture with two fights, a bald motorcycle gang, the Mafia, a love story, a pickup truck, a tow truck, Fats Domino, a foul-mouthed octogenarian, an oversexed orangutan and a contest for the bare knuckle championship of the world?
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy is so low-key, so sweet and offhand and slight, there are times when it hardly even seems happy to be a movie.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Why didn't they make a baseball picture? Why did The Natural have to be turned into idolatry on behalf of Robert Redford? Why did a perfectly good story, filled with interesting people, have to be made into one man's ascension to the godlike, especially when no effort is made to give that ascension meaning?
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    City Slickers II, subtitled The Legend of Curly's Gold, makes the mistake of thinking we care more about the gold than about the city slickers. Like too many sequels, it has forgotten what the first film was really about. Slickers II is about the MacGuffin instead of the characters.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Carny is bursting with more information about American carnivals that it can contain, surrounding a plot too thin to support it. Without knowing much about the reasons why the movie was made, I'd guess on the evidence that the director, Robert Kaylor, was fascinated by carnivals, spent a lot of time with one and shot a lot of film, and then found himself forced, to shape his material into some sort of traditional, commercial story. Inside this movie is a documentary struggling to get out.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    On some dumb fundamental level, Airport kept me interested for a couple of hours. I can't quite remember why. The plot has few surprises (you know and I know that no airplane piloted by Dean Martin ever crashed). The gags are painfully simpleminded (a priest, pretending to cross himself, whacks a wise guy across the face). And the characters talk in regulation B-movie clichés like no B-movie you've seen in ten years.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The opening scenes of Johnny Dangerously are so funny you just don't see how they can keep it up. And you're right: They can't. But they make a real try. The movie wants to do for gangster films what Airplane! did for Airport, and Top Secret! did for spy movies.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The story of Black Rain is thin and prefabricated and doesn't stand up to much scrutiny, so Scott distracts us with overwrought visuals.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The Jessica Lange character is wrong because she isn't selfish enough. In the original, the character was a tough dame who had married the fat spider for money, and was looking out only for herself. Here the character's motivations are marred by soft bourgeois values like affection and career dreams. The original film had a good girl and a bad girl; the Lange character wants to be both.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Seems Like Old Times is another one of those near-misses that leaves a movie critic in a quandary. It's a funny movie, and it made me laugh out loud a lot, but in the final analysis it just didn't quite edge over the mystical line into success.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The first five or 10 minutes of Airplane II -- The Sequel are genuinely funny -- so funny I thought maybe this movie was going to work. That turned out to be a premature hope. The new inspirations quickly run out, and Airplane II turns into a retread, plundering the same situations and characters that made the original Airplane so funny.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Class is a prep-school retread of "The Graduate" that knows some of its scenes are funny and some are serious, but never figures out quite how they should go together. The result is an uncomfortable, inconsistent movie that doesn't really pay off -- a movie in which everything points to two absolutely key scenes that are, inexplicably, the two most awkward scenes in the film.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The Warriors is a real peculiarity, a movie about street gang warfare, written and directed as an exercise in mannerism. There's hardly a moment when we believe that the movie's gangs are real or that their members are real people or that they inhabit a real city. That's where the peculiarity comes in: I don't think we're supposed to. No matter what impression the ads give, this isn't even remotely intended as an action film. It's a set piece. It's a ballet of stylized male violence.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The Frisco Kid has a certain softness at its center. The Wilder character has a sweetness, a niceness, that's interesting for the character but doesn't seem to work with this material. It's really nobody's movie. The screenplay has been around Hollywood for several years, and Aldrich seems to have taken it on as a routine assignment.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It's so neat, so formula, so contrived, I was thinking about "The Graduate" instead of about characters I had spent two hours with. So, I suspect, was Nichols.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Ty Cobb was by many accounts a mean-tempered, vicious, drunken, wife- beating, racist SOB who was impossible to spend any length of time with, and the movie Cobb faithfully represents those qualities, especially the last one.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The material never really takes hold. It seems awkward. It lacks fire and passion. Watching it was like having a pale memory of a vivid experience.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    PCU
    The movie is afraid to be - yes - Politically Incorrect. It isn't really critical of anybody's behavior, and it sketches its campus fringe groups in broad, defanged generalizations. Beneath its facade of contemporary politics, it's another formula film in which the kids want to party and get drunk, and the adults are fuddy-duddies.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves is a murky, unfocused, violent and depressing version of the classic story, with little of the lightheartedness and romance we expect from Robin Hood.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I can imagine a film in which a creature like Sil struggles with her dual nature, and tries to find self-knowledge. Like Frankenstein's monster, she would be an object of pity. But that would be way too subtle for Species, which just adds a slick front end to the basic horror vocabulary of things jumping out from behind stuff.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Somehow I kept waiting for the movie to get back on track - to get back to the zany comedy I thought I'd been promised. My problems with Cadillac Man were probably inspired more by false expectations than by anything on the screen.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Since the predator is imaginary but the people who made this film are not, Predator 2 speaks sadly of their own lack of curiosity and imagination.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There's a lot of potential charm here, but the director, Emma-Kate Croghan, is so distracted by stylistic quirks that the characters are forever being upstaged by the shots they're in.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The Dream Team is essentially a formula picture filled with missed opportunities. The fact that it has several passages that really work, and that the actors create characters we can care about, only underlines the bankruptcy of its imagination.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The most curious thing about Hiding Out is that the plot continued to intrigue me even after I'd more or less given up on the movie's ability to find anything interesting in its material. What would it really be like to be in high school again? To revisit your past, knowing what you know now? Hollywood ought to make a good movie about that idea. In fact, Hollywood has: Peggy Sue Got Married. This one fails by comparison.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    K-9
    If the crime elements in K-9 are routine, the relationship between Belushi and the dog at least has the courage to be goofy.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Watching the movie made me think of those subteen career novels I used to read in grade school, with titles like Brent Jones, Boy Reporter. They were always about how some kid got a lucky break and got hired by a newspaper, where of course he quickly learned the ropes and scooped the world on a big story, after which he got a telegram from the president and went off to college with a rosy future ahead of him. Those books came from a more innocent time, but Don't Tell Mom the Babysitter's Dead has been made in the same spirit.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A confusing and not very exciting private eye caper.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The plot in Throw Mama from the Train is top-heavy, but the movie doesn't make as much as it could from its weird characters.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Here are the two most obvious problems that sentient audiences will have with the plot. (1) Modern encryption cannot be intuitively deciphered, by rainmen or anyone else, without a key. And, (2) If a 9-year-old kid can break your code, don't kill the kid, kill the programmers.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Little Darlings really wants to be two movies at once: A fairly serious film about teenagers and sex, but also a box-office winner like "National Lampoon's Animal House" or "Meatballs." That's why we get awkwardly forced comedy like the food-fight scene. The movie also suffers from uncertain direction.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie's not without charm. There's a fresh, sweet relationship between one of the girls (Phoebe Cates) and her boyfriend, in which she is permitted to have the normal fears, doubts and reservations of anyone her age. I'm not sure how that plot got into this smarmy-minded movie, but it was like a breath of fresh air.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The gift of Christopher Reeve, in his best scenes and when the filmmakers allow it, is to play Superman without laughing, to take him seriously so that we can have some innocent escapist fun. Helen Slater has the same gift, but is given even less chance to exercise it in Supergirl, and the result is an unhappy, unfunny, unexciting movie.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The performances are all just fine; I wish they'd been at the service of another movie.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Ridiculous -- yes. Comical at times -- yes. Silliest film seen in some time by the Animals Movies Critics' Team. BUT -- great special effects as men BECOME werewolves. WOMEN, too. Before your eyes. Done with -- says here -- HYDRAULICS! Sensational!
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I didn't find “The Jerk” very funny...There's a smarmy undercurrent in this movie that seems to imply that Steve Martin may be playing a jerk, but that we all know what a cool guy he is. Well, if you're going to play a jerk, play one as if you think you are one, or you might wind up looking like a jerk.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I didn't much like RoboCop 2 (the use of that killer child is beneath contempt), but I've gotta hand it to them: It's strange how funny it is, for a movie so bad. Or how bad, for a movie so funny.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Star Maps is not, to be sure, boring. But it is wildly unfocused.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The film establishes a bland, reassuring, comforting Brady reality - a certain muted tone that works just fine but needs, I think, a bleaker contrast from outside to fully exploit the humor.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I kept asking myself what the film was really trying to say about the human condition as reflected by John Merrick, and I kept drawing blanks. The film's philosophy is this shallow: (1)Wow, the Elephant Man sure looked hideous, and (2)gosh, isn't it wonderful how he kept on in spite of everything?
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    As it is, the movie goes in one direction and the cable guy goes in another, and by the end we aren't really looking forward to seeing Jim Carrey reappear on the screen.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It's never really believable, but it tries to be, and it would have had a better chance as straight satirical comment.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    An expensive, exhaustive, 150-mintue odyssey that doesn’t so much conclude as cross the finish line and collapse. It has been outfitted with expensive stars and a glossy production, but it doesn’t really make us care.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Sam Peckinpah's The Getaway is a big, glossy, impersonal mechanical toy. It's like one of those devices for executive desks, with the stainless steel balls on the strings: It functions with great efficiency but doesn't accomplish anything.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The ghouls are a little too ridiculous to quite fulfill their function in the movie. They make all the wrong decisions, are incompetent and ill-coordinated.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    As an achievement, Computer Chess is laudable. As a film, it's missable.

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