For 4,117 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 75% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 23% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 The Age of Innocence
Lowest review score: 0 The Life of David Gale
Score distribution:
4117 movie reviews
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie is finally just a little too ungainly, too jumbled at the end, for me to recommend, but it has heart, and I feel a lot of affection for it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A sweet but inconsequential romantic comedy.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Apart from funny supporting work by the inventor of the Mind Control and the guy in the "Q" role, the movie is pretty routine.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    By the time the Incredible Hulk had completed his hulk-on-hulk showdown with the Incredible Blonsky, I had been using my Timex with the illuminated dial way too often.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The Santa Clause (so named after the clause on Santa's calling card that requires Scott to take over the job) is often a clever and amusing movie, and there's a lot of fresh invention in it.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I found the opening third tremendously intriguing and involving, I thought the emotions were so real they could be touched, but then the film lost its way and fell into the clutches of sentimental melodrama.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's not good, but it's nowhere near as bad as most recent comedies; it has real laughs, but it misses real opportunities.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Taken shows Mills as a one-man rescue squad, a master of every skill, a laser-eyed, sharpshooting, pursuit-driving, pocket-picking, impersonating, knife-fighting, torturing, karate-fighting killing machine who can cleverly turn over a petrol tank with one pass in his car and strategically ignite it with another.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Donnie Darko is the one that got away. But it was fun trying to land it.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The Big Chill is a splendid technical exercise. It has all the right moves. It knows all the right words. Its characters have all the right clothes, expressions, fears, lusts and ambitions. But there's no payoff and it doesn't lead anywhere. I thought at first that was a weakness of the movie. There also is the possibility that it's the movie's message.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Seems torn between conflicting possibilities: It's structured like a comedy, but there are undertones of darker themes, and I almost wish they'd allowed the plot to lead them into those shadows.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The nicest touch is that Battleship has an honest-to-God third act, instead of just settling for nonstop fireballs and explosions, as Bay likes to do. I don't want to spoil it for you. Let's say the Greatest Generation still has the right stuff and leave it at that.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Told chronologically, it might have accumulated considerable power. Told as a labyrinthine tangle of intercut timelines and locations, it is a frustrating exercise in self-indulgence by writer-director Guillermo Arriaga.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Red Lights also shows a director who knows how to construct a story and build interest, but at the end, it flies apart. I wonder if there was an earlier draft. I suspect most audiences would prefer a film with an ending that plays by the same rules as the rest of the story.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I have the curious suspicion that it will be enjoyed most by someone who knows absolutely nothing about Shakespeare, and can see it simply as the story of some very strange people who seem to be reading from the same secret script.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I have such an unreasonable affection for this movie, indeed, that it is only by slapping myself alongside the head and drinking black coffee that I can restrain myself from recommending it.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The Soloist has all the elements of an uplifting drama, except for the uplift.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    In Darkness has the best of intentions, but is a boring dirge, lingering far too long in sewers and wringing as much righteousness as possible out of scenes so dimly lit, they border on obscurity.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There must be more. We will not discover it here.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Broderick is splendid as the gambler. He knows, as many addicts do, that the addictive personality is very inward, however much acting out might take place.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This movie is lively at times, it's lovely to look at, and the actors are persuasive in very difficult material. But around and around it goes, and where it stops, nobody by that point much cares.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie is not terrifically good, but the premise is intriguing.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The secret may be that Cronenberg approaches his trashy material with the objectivity of a scientist; it is his detached, cold style that makes the material creepy instead of simply sensational.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    As good as Gibson is, his character is still caught between the tragedy of the man and the absurdity of the Beaver. Fugitive thoughts of Señor Wences crept into my mind. I'm sorry, but they did.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The ending doesn't work, as I've said, but most of the movie works so well I'm almost recommending it, anyway -- maybe not to everybody, but certainly to people with a curiosity about how a movie can go very right, and then step wrong.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's only 76 minutes long, but although kids will like it, their parents will be sneaking looks at their watches.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A decent futuristic action picture with some great sets, some intriguing ideas, and a few images that will stay with me.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Here's a movie that teeters on the edge of being really pretty good and loses its way.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Has zest and humor and some lovable supporting characters, but do we really need this zapped-up version of the Robert Louis Stevenson classic? Eighteenth century galleons and pirate ships go sailing through the stars, and it somehow just doesn't look right.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Living these lives, for these people, must have been sad and tedious, and so, inevitably, is their story, and it must be said, the film about it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The film is elegiac and sad, beautifully mounted, but not as compelling as it should be.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A movie where the story, like the sub, sometimes seems to be running blind. In its best moments it can evoke fear, and it does a good job of evoking the claustrophobic terror of a little World War II boat.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Perhaps this movie was so close to Egoyan's heart that he was never able to stand back and get a good perspective on it -- that he is as conflicted as his characters, and as confused in the face of shifting points of view.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I look at a film like this and must respect it for its ingenuity and love of detail. Then I remember "Amelie" and its heroine played by Audrey Tautou, and I understand what's wrong: There's nobody in the story who much makes us care.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    All of this makes an interesting, if not gripping, film about the play, the playwright and the lead-up work to a stage production. It also leaves me wanting a great deal more.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Sweet, light entertainment, but could have been more.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This perhaps sounds like a hilarious movie. So it could be, in the hands of the masters of classic British comedy. Unfortunately, the director is the Swede Lasse ("Chocolat"), who sees it as a heart-warming romance and doesn't take advantage of the rich eccentricity in the story.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This is the kind of movie you sort of like, and yet even while you're liking it, you're thinking how much better these characters and this situation could have been with a little more imagination and daring.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    What I got was a fairly intriguing story and an actual plot that is actually resolved. That doesn't make the movie good enough to recommend, but it makes it better than the ads suggest.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Does John Carter get the job done for the weekend action audience? Yes, I suppose it does. The massive city on legs that stomps across the landscape is well-done. The Tharks are ingenious, although I'm not sure why they need tusks. Lynn Collins makes a terrific heroine.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The Wolfman avoids what must have been the temptation to update its famous story. It plants itself securely in period, with a great-looking production set in 1891.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Dr. Furter is played by a British actor named Tim Curry, who bears a certain resemblance to Loretta Young in drag. He's the best thing in the movie, maybe because he seems to be having the most fun.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Watching the film, I felt impatience with these bullheaded men and the women who endure them. That's what Marston intended, I'm sure, but the stupidity of the characters doesn't provide much of an emotional payoff.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Harmless, brainless, good-natured fun.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Her Majesty is the kind of movie where you start out smiling, and then smile more broadly, and then really smile, and then realize with a sinking heart that the filmmakers are losing it.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I cannot in strict accuracy recommend this film. It's such a jumble of action and motivation, ill-defined characters and action howlers.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    If the movie finally doesn't work as well as it should, it may be because the material isn't a good fit for Kitano's hard-edged underlying style.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The reader of a pulp crime thriller might be satisfied simply with the prurient descriptions, and certainly this film visualizes those and has as its victims Jessica Alba and Kate Hudson, who embody paperback covers, but the dominant presence in the film is Lou Ford, and there just doesn’t seem to be anybody at home.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The damnedest film. I can't recommend it, but I would not for one second discourage you from seeing it.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The fundamental problem is the point of view.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This is a harmless and pleasant Disney comedy and one of only three family movies playing over the holidays.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Friends With Kids is altogether too casual about parenthood, and that supplies a shaky foundation to a plot that's less about human nature and more about clever dialogue.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    For all of its huge budget, Independence Day is a timid movie when it comes to imagination. The aliens, when we finally see them, are a serious disappointment.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    3
    The most that can be said for the characters here is they all seem mighty pleased.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Weighed down by its splendor. There are scenes where the costumes are so sumptuous, the sets so vast, the music so insistent, that we lose sight of the humans behind the dazzle of the production.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    M. Butterfly does not take hold the way the stage play did.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    For me, Happy Feet Two is pretty thin soup. The animation is bright and attractive, the music gives the characters something to do, but the movie has too much dialogue in the areas of philosophy and analysis.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Lawless is a well-made film about ignorant and violent people. Like the recent "Killer Joe," I can only admire this film's craftsmanship and acting, and regret its failure to rise above them.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I think the screenplay, written by director Isabel Coixet, is shameless in its weepy sentiment. But there is truth here, too, and a convincing portrait of working-class lives.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Since you have probably not seen "Nine Queens," Criminal will be new to you, and I predict you'll like the remake about as much as I liked the original -- three stars' worth. If, however, you've seen "Nine Queens," you may agree that some journeys, however entertaining, need only be taken once.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Ocean's Thirteen proceeds with insouciant dialogue, studied casualness, and a lotta stuff happening, none of which I cared much about because the movie doesn't pause to develop the characters, who are forced to make do with their movie-star personas.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Perry tries to be faithful to the play and also to his own boldly and simply told stories, and the two styles don't fit together.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The filmmakers must have known they were not making a good movie, but they didn't use that as an excuse to be boring and lazy. Barb Wire has a high energy level, and a sense of deranged fun.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    While the movie contains delights and inventions without pause and has undeniable charm, while it is always wonderful to watch, while it has the Miyazaki visual wonderment, it's a disappointment, compared to his recent work.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    But the problem is, The Deal, like a lot of real-life Wall Street deals, is a labyrinth into which the plot tends to disappear. The ideas in the film are challenging, the level of expertise is high, the performances are convincing, and it's only at the level of story construction and dramatic clarity that the film doesn't succeed.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Generation P appears to be Russian slang for Generation Perestroika and "The Pepsi Generation," which nicely reflects this film's cockamamie spirit, sort of a cross between "Mad Men" and an acid trip.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The premise is intriguing, and for a time it seems that the Date Doctor may indeed know things about women that most men in the movies are not allowed to know, but the third act goes on autopilot just when the Doctor should be in.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There is something repulsive and manipulative about it, and even its best scenes have the flavor of a kid in the school yard, trying to show you pictures you don't feel like looking at.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Some stretches are very funny, although the laughter is undermined by the desperation and sadness of the situations.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    De Palma's Untouchables, like the TV series that inspired it, depends more on cliches than on artistic invention.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie is lightweight, as it should be.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There's not much wrong with Tony Scott's The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3, except that there's not much really right about it.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Tells the kind of story that would feel right at home in a silent film, and I suppose I mean that as a compliment.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    On the basis of Gigantic, Matt Aselton can make a fine and original film. This isn't quite it, but it has moments so good, all you wish for is a second draft.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Clive Owen can be a likable actor, but the character is working against him...And please, please, give us a break from the scenes where the ghost of the departed turns up and starts talking as if she's not dead.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie is forgiving. But the search for happiness is doomed by definition: You must be happy with what you have, not with what you desire, because the cost of the quest is too high.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    All that could redeem this thoroughly foreseeable unfolding would be colorful characters and good acting. Everybody's Fine comes close, but not close enough.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The film takes the form but not the feel of a comic thriller. It's quirkier than that.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie itself is sort of bland and obvious and comfortable.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Unfortunately, the parts of the movie that are truly good are buried beneath the deadening layers of thriller cliches and an unconvincing love story.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The Sorcerer's Apprentice is a perfectly typical example of its type, professionally made and competently acted.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's so clever that finally that's all it is: clever.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The Prince & Me has the materials to be a heartwarming mass-market love story, but it doesn't assemble them convincingly.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There is a cool, mannered elegance to the picture that I like, but it's dead at its center.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Besson has a natural gift for plunging into drama with a charged-up visual style.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Like "The Godfather," it shows him (Makovski) as a crook with certain standards, surrounded by rats with none.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I admired Intacto more than I liked it, for its ingenious construction and the way it keeps a certain chilly distance between its story and the dangers of popular entertainment.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Kurosawa was a great artist and so even his lesser work is interesting -- just as we would love to find one last lost play, however minor, by his hero Shakespeare.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The visual style is all Zeffirelli, and it is interesting that the opera-within-the-film is not skimped on, as is usually the case in films containing scenes from other productions.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Julie & Julia is not lacking in entertainment value, especially with the Streep performance. But if the men had been portrayed as more high-spirited, it might have taken on intriguing dimensions.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    In its use of locations and sets, it's an impressive achievement by director Dean Wright, whose credits include some of the effects on the "Lord of the Rings" films. If it had not hewed so singlemindedly to the Catholic view and included all religions under the banner of religious liberty, I believe it would have been more effective.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The warmth of the actors makes it surprisingly tender, considering the premise that is blatantly absurd. If you allow yourself to think for one moment of the paradoxes, contradictions and logical difficulties involved, you will be lost. The movie supports no objective thought.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie as a whole looks and occasionally plays better than it is.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    So the movie probably contains enough laughs to satisfy the weekend audience. Where it falls short is in the characters and relationships.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Here their hearts are in the right place, but the film tries to say too many things for its running time.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The Theory of Flying is actually fairly enjoyable. At least it doesn't drown its message in syrup and cornball sentiment.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There's not a song I wouldn't hear again with pleasure, or a clip that might not make me smile, but as a whole, it's not much. Like cotton candy, it's better as a concept than as an experience.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    But the film is not as amusing as the premise, and there were long stretches when I'd had quite enough of Mrs. Doubtfire.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    3-D is a distraction and an annoyance.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This is a story that has been told time and again in the movies, and sometimes the performances overcome the condescension of the formula.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It isn't a successful movie but is sometimes a very interesting one, and there is real charm and comic agility by the two leads.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The story is sometimes overwritten, often overwrought, includes an overheard conversation on the "Nancy Drew" level, and yet holds our attention and contains surprises right until the end.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    You watch, you are absorbed, and from scene to scene, Henry Fool seems to be adding up, but then your hand closes on air. I am left unsure of my response - of any response.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Honey doesn't have a shred of originality (except for the high-energy choreography), but there's something fundamentally reassuring about a movie that respects ancient formulas; it's like a landmark preservation program.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's pleasant enough as a date movie, but that's all.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The Host is top-heavy with profound, sonorous conversations, all tending to sound like farewells. The movie is so consistently pitched at the same note, indeed, that the structure robs it of possibilities for dramatic tension.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    While I admired it in an abstract way, I felt repelled by the material on a visceral level.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's pleasant and amusing. If I had seen it before I was born, I would have loved it.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Dante's Peak, written by Leslie Bohem and directed by Roger Donaldson, follows the disaster formula so faithfully that if you walk in while the movie is in progress, you can estimate how long the story has to run. That it is skillful is a tribute to the filmmakers.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I found In the Land of Blood and Honey to be moving and involving, but somehow reduced by its melodrama to a minor key. The scale of the ages-old evil and religious hatred in the region seemed to make the fates of these particular characters a matter of dramatic convenience.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The artistry is peaceful and comforting to the eyes but not especially stirring. Given the pictorial extremes that Studio Ghibli has gone to in the past, "Up on Poppy Hill" is weak tea.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Has too much docudrama and not enough soul.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A high-speed, high-tech kiddie thriller that's kinda cute but sorta relentless.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It is also a film of controlled visual style; Kitano's compositions are like arrangements of bodies in space and time. That said, and with all due respect, I expected a better time.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Did I like the film? Yeah, kinda, but not enough to recommend. The first film arrived with freshness and an unexpected zing, but this one seems too content to follow in its footsteps.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Princess Kaiulani is much remembered in Hawaii, much forgotten on the mainland, and the subject of this interesting but creaky biopic.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I have no idea if this movie was made stoned. Like its predecessors by Cheech and Chong, it might as well have been.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It leads to one of those endings where you sit there wishing they'd tried a little harder to think up something better.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    We know Kline can play kooky (he won an Oscar as Otto in "A Fish Called Wanda"), and he does it very well, but the effort can become exhausting after a while.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie's premise devalues any relationship, makes futile any friendship or romance, and spits, not into the face of destiny, but backward into the maw of time. It even undermines the charm of compound interest.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There is no one in the movie to provide a reasonable reaction to anything; the adults are all demented, evil, or, in the case of Mr. Poe, stunningly lacking in perception, and the kids are plucky enough, but rather dazed by their misfortunes.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Is the film worth seeing? Well, yes and no. Yes, because it is exactly what it is, and no, for the same reason.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I object to the movie not on sociological grounds but because I suspect a real geisha house floated on currents deeper and more subtle than the broad melodrama on display here.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I didn't laugh much. I don't think the Stooges are funny, although perhaps I might once have. Some of the sight gags were clever, but meh. The three leads did an admirable job of impersonation. I think this might be pretty much the movie Stooges fans were looking for.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Chasing Madoff is not a very good documentary, but it's a very devastating one.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A well-made thriller with a lot of good acting, but the death of Elisabeth Campbell is so unnecessarily graphic and gruesome that by the end I felt sort of unclean.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie is broad and clumsy, and the dialogue cannot be described as witty, but a kind of grandeur creeps into the screenplay by Ted Griffin and Jeff Nathanson.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A perfectly acceptable brainless action thriller.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The problem with Code 46 is that the movie, filled with ideas and imagination, is murky in its rules and intentions. I cannot say I understand the hows and whys of this future world, nor do I much care, since it's mostly a clever backdrop to a love affair that would easily teleport to many other genres.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The idea of the president's daughter being held captive isn't blindingly original (it's an alarmingly dangerous occupation), but placing the story on a space station is a masterstroke, since we're about filled up to here with prison movies set on Earth.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Some of these stories are fascinating and some are heartbreaking, but together they seem too contrived.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Because it is light and stylish and good-hearted, it is quite possible to enjoy, in the right frame of mind. This is more of a movie to see on video, on an empty night when you need something to hurl at the gloom.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It comes to life in the dance sequences, and then drifts away again.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I think Dwayne Johnson has a likable screen presence and is a good choice for an innocuous family entertainment like this.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's not the idea that people will kill each other for entertainment that makes Series 7 jolting. What the movie correctly perceives is that somewhere along the line we've lost all sense of shame in our society.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Some of the bits work and others don't, but no one seems to be keeping score, and that's part of the movie's charm.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie, unfortunately, doesn't really work; it's one of those films where the characters always seem to be Behaving, as if ordinary life has to be jacked up into eccentricity.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Has little islands of humor and even perfection, floating in a sea of missed marks and murky intentions.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Sam and Frankie are certainly interesting enough that a film about them coming to grips with this hidden truth would have been justified. It also would probably have been harder to write than this one, so People Like Us marches on with a coy little smile, toying with Frankie and the audience.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The experience of watching The Doors is not always very pleasant.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A carnival geek show elevated in the direction of art. It never quite gets there, but it tries with every fiber of its craft to redeem its pulp origins, and we must give it credit for the courage of its depravity.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie's shot in black and white; Allen is one of the rare and valuable directors who sometimes insists in working in the format that is the soul of cinema.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Passes the time pleasantly and has a few good laughs.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It isn't a masterpiece, but it is a good-hearted, sweet comedy, featuring an overland chase that isn't original but sure is energetic.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    In its clumsy way, it throws in comments now and then to show it knows the difference between Arab terrorists and American citizens.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie breaks down into anecdotes that don't flow or build, and everything is narrated by the Gilot character.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Green Lantern does not intend to be plausible. It intends to be a sound-and-light show, assaulting the audience with sensational special effects. If that's what you want, that's what you get.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This is the kind of movie you happen across on TV, and linger to watch out of curiosity, but its inspired moments serve only to point out how routine, and occasionally how slow and wordy, the rest of it is.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It drifts above the surface of its natural subjects, content to be a genre picture. We're always aware of the formula--and in a picture based on real life, we shouldn't be.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This movie will no doubt be pitched to the same audiences that loved "The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel." It even brings Maggie Smith along. But it lacks that film's life, intelligence and spirit. It has a good heart. I'll give it that. Maybe what it needs is more exotic marigolds.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Sex Is Comedy is not sure what it's really about, or how to get there; the director is seen as flighty and impulsive, the situations seem like set-ups, and we never know what the Actor and Actress are really thinking -- or if thinking has anything to do with it.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    An enjoyable film, and yet it left me somehow unsatisfied...there is too much contrivance in the way [Austen] dispatches her men to London when she is done with them.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The moral reasoning in the film is so confusing that only by completely sidestepping it can the plot work at all.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Seven Years in Tibet is an ambitious and beautiful movie with much to interest the patient viewer, but it makes the common mistake of many films about travelers and explorers: It is more concerned with their adventures than with what they discover.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's fast-footed and fun. "Rugrats in Paris" had charms for grownups, however, Recess: School's Out seems aimed more directly at grade-schoolers.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Pleasant and well-acted and easy to watch.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's not enough to like such films because they're "so bad they're good." You need to specialize, and like the films because they're so good about being so bad they're good. Modus Operandi, a film by Frankie Latina that has won praise on the midnight movie festival circuit, is such a film.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    What sets Heathers apart from less intelligent teenage movies is that it has a point of view toward this subject matter - a bleak, macabre and bitingly satirical one.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Clint Eastwood's film is a determined attempt to be faithful to the book's spirit, but something ineffable is lost just by turning on the camera: Nothing we see can be as amazing as what we've imagined.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The real objective of all the "M:I" movies is to provide a clothesline for sensational action scenes. Nothing else matters, and explanatory dialogue would only slow things down. This formula worked satisfactorily in "M:I," directed by Brian De Palma, and "M:I II," directed by John Woo, and I suppose it works up to a point in M:I III, directed by J.J. Abrams, if what you want is endless, nonstop high-tech action.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It offers wonderful things, but they aren't what's important. It's as if Burton directed at arm's length, unwilling to find juice in the story.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The part that needs work didn't cost money. It's the screenplay. Having created the characters and fashioned the outline, Tarantino doesn't do much with his characters except to let them talk too much, especially when they should be unconscious from shock and loss of blood.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    One of the irritations of Ghost is that the Moore character is such a slow study.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This good movie is buried beneath millions of dollars that were spent on "production values" that wreck the show.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    To give the movie credit, it's as bored with the underlying plot as we are. Even the prom queen election is only a backdrop for more interesting material, as She's All That explores differences in class and style, and peppers its screenplay with very funny little moments.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The best performance, because it's more nuanced, is by Liev Schreiber. His Zus Bielski is more concerned with the big picture, more ideological, more driven by tactics.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There's not much original about the film, but it's played with high spirits and good cheer, there are lots of musical interludes, and it's pitched straight at families.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Act of Valor is gift-wrapped in patriotism. It was once intended as a recruitment film, and that's how it plays.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    O Brother contains sequences that are wonderful in themselves--lovely short films--but the movie never really shapes itself into a whole.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's skillfully mounted and fitfully intriguing, but weaves such a tangled web that at the end I defy anyone in the audience to explain the exact loyalties and motives of the leading characters.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Tequila Sunrise is an intriguing movie with interesting characters, but it might have worked better if it had found a cleaner narrative line from beginning to end. It's hard to surrender yourself to a film that seems to be toying with you.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    She (Taymor) doesn't capture Shakespeare's tone (or his meaning, I believe), but she certainly has boldness in her reinvention.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie does have charm and moments of humor, but what it doesn't have is romance.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A sweet, innocent family movie about stray dogs that seem as well-trained as Olympic champions. Friday, the Jack Russell terrier who's the leader of the pack, does more acting than most of the humans, and doesn't even get billing.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The weakness of the film is the weakness of the leading role. That's not a criticism of Mark Wahlberg, who has a quite capable range, but of how he and Russell see the character.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    We can enjoy the suspense of the opening scenes, and some of the drama. The performances are in keeping with the material. But toward the end, when we realize that the entire reality of the film is problematical, there is a certain impatience. It's as if our chain is being yanked.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's innocent and sometimes kind of charming. The sets are entertaining. There are parallels in appearance and theme to a low-rent "Dark City."
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The story is determined to be colorful and melodramatic, like a soap opera where the characters suffer in ways that look intriguing.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Dead Snow, as you may have gathered, is a comedy, but played absolutely seriously by sincere, earnest young actors.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It looks great. The technical credits are impeccable, and Clooney and Kidman negotiate assorted dangers skillfully. But it's mostly spare parts from other thrillers.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    As a source of information about his life and work, this interview is almost worthless, but as an insight into his style, it is priceless.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's a film you enjoy in pieces, but the jigsaw never gets solved.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Absorbing, if somewhat slow-paced, and has without doubt the most blood-curdling scene of live childbirth in a PG-13 movie.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It circles the possibility of mental and spiritual infidelity like a cat wondering if a mouse might still be alive. Watching it, I felt it would be fascinating to see a movie that was really, truthfully, fearlessly about this subject.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This is not a film most people will enjoy. Its qualities are apparent only if appreciates cinematic style for itself.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Seen simply as a film, The Motorcycle Diaries is attenuated and tedious. We understand that Ernesto and Alberto are friends, but that's about all we find out about them; they develop none of the complexities of other on-the-road couples, like Thelma and Louise, Bonnie and Clyde or Huck and Jim. There isn't much chemistry.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's the kind of movie you can sit back and enjoy, as long as you don't make the mistake of thinking too much.

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