For 4,035 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 75% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 23% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 12.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 The Straight Story
Lowest review score: 0 Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo
Score distribution:
4,035 movie reviews
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    You can see how this movie could have been jacked up into a one-level action picture, but what makes it special is how Thornton modulates the material.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Surprisingly touching.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    What is most wonderful about Man on the Moon, a very good film, is that it remains true to Kaufman's stubborn vision.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    One of the most complex and visually interesting science fiction movies in a long time.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Movies like this are not for everyone, but arrive like private messages for their own particular audiences.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Amores Perros will be too much for some filmgoers, just as "Pulp Fiction" was and "Santa Sangre" certainly was, but it contains the spark of inspiration.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A dark, grisly, horrifying and intelligent thriller.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The beauty of the film is in its quietness.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The whole movie is quiet, introspective, thoughtful.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie reveals its serious undertones (with commentary by the Greek chorus, which occasionally breaks into song and dance) while at the same time developing a plot that lends itself to slapstick.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A harrowing look at institutional cruelty, perpetrated by the Catholic Church in Ireland, and justified by a perverted hysteria about sex.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Whether the protest movement hastened the end of the Vietnam War is hard to say, but it is likely that Lyndon Johnson's decision not to run for re-election was influenced by the climate it helped to create.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Drew me in from the opening shots. Byler reveals his characters in a way that intrigues and even fascinates us, and he never reduces the situation to simple melodrama, which would release the tension. This is like a psychological thriller, in which the climax has to do with feelings, not actions.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The strength of the thriller genre is that it provides stories with built-in energy and structure. The weakness is that thrillers often seem to follow foreseeable formulas. Frears and his writer, Steve Knight, use the power of the thriller and avoid the weaknesses in giving us, really, two movies for the price of one.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The film is poetic and erotic, creepy and melodramatic, overwrought and sometimes mocking, as if F. W. Murnau's "Nosferatu" (1922) had a long-lost musical version.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Both hilarious and sorrowful.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It is just as well that Last Crusade will indeed be Indy's last film. It would be too sad to see the series grow old and thin, like the James Bond movies.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Exists on a knife edge between comedy and sadness. There are big laughs, and then quiet moments when we're touched.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie is a dazzling song and dance extravaganza, with just enough words to support the music and allow everyone to catch their breath between songs.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    As for myself, I think he made it all up and never killed anybody. Having been involved in a weekly television show myself, I know for a melancholy fact that there is just not enough time between tapings to fly off to Helsinki and kill for my government.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    What made Shackleton's adventure so immediate to later generations was that he took along a photographer, Frank Hurley, who shot motion picture film and stills.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Nick Nolte plays a great shambling wreck of a wounded Hemingway hero in The Good Thief, a film that's like a descent into the funkiest dive on the wrong side of the wrong town.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A new documentary about the life of this producer who put together one of the most remarkable winning streaks in Hollywood history, and followed it with a losing streak that almost destroyed him. It's one of the most honest films ever made about Hollywood.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It's the kind of movie you know you can trust, and you give yourself over to affection for these characters who are so lovingly observed.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Stevie seems destined to end the way it does, and is the more courageous and powerful for it. A satisfying ending would have been a lie.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Who is this movie for? Not for most 13-year-olds, that's for sure. The R rating is richly deserved, no matter how much of a lark the poster promises. Maybe the film is simply for those who admire fine, focused acting and writing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    An imperfect but deeply involving and beautifully made Western.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    There is an old saying: Be careful what you ask for, because you might get it. The Piano Teacher has a more ominous lesson: Be especially careful with someone who has asked for you.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Alexander Payne is a director whose satire is omnidirectional. He doesn't choose an easy target and march on it. He stands in the middle of his story and attacks on all directions.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Was and is a brilliant horror film, one with an archetypal ability to reach and disturb us. If I were showing The Exorcist to a friend, I would show the 1973 version without the slightest hesitation.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A treasure of a movie because it knows so much about baseball and so little about love.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Uusually satisfying in the way it unfolds.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The plot is as good as crime procedurals get, but the movie is really better than its plot because of the three-dimensional characters.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It's a bleakly funny parable that could be titled "Between Enemy Lines."
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Robert Redford has directed Quiz Show as entertainment, history, and challenge.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A delicious pastry of a movie -- You see it, and later when you think about it, you smile.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The closing scenes of the movie involve Szpilman's confrontation with a German captain named Wilm Hosenfeld -- Polanski's direction of this scene, his use of pause and nuance, is masterful.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A skillful, efficient film that involves us in the clever and deceptive game being played by Ramius and in the best efforts of those on both sides to figure out what he plans to do with his submarine - and how he plans to do it.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This is the best-looking horror film since Coppola's "Bram Stoker's Dracula."
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Wickedly funny.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    There is pain, humor, irony and sweetness in the character, and a voice and manner so distinctive, he is the most memorable movie character I've seen in a long time.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Power to absorb, entertain and anger.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    As Darabont directs it, it tells a story with beginning, middle, end, vivid characters, humor, outrage and emotional release. Dickensian.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Basically what we have here is a drama, with comedy occasionally lifting the mood. The result is a surprising seriousness; this isn't the mindless romp with cute animals.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A sly little comic treasure.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    What's special about the film is at a deeper level, down where (Tykwer) engages with the souls of his characters.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Not only funny and wicked, clever and visually inventive, but . . . kind and sweet. Tender and touching.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    An inspired example of the story in which the adolescent hero discovers that the world sucks, people are phonies, and sex is a consolation. Because the genre is well established, what makes the movie fresh is smart writing, skewed characters, and the title performance by Kieran Culkin.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    (Coppola) has the courage to play it in a minor key.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Not just a cute romp but an involving story that has something to say.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    xXx
    A threat to the Bond franchise? Not a threat so much as a salute. I don't want James Bond to turn crude and muscular on me; I like the suave style. But I like Xander, too, especially since he seems to have studied Bond so very carefully.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie makes no attempt to soften the material or make it comforting through the cliches of melodrama.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This isn't a made-for-video that they decided to put into theaters, but a version intended from the first to be theatrical. That's important, because it means more detail and complexity went into the animation.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Kandahar does not provide deeply drawn characters, memorable dialogue or an exciting climax. Its traffic is in images.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Max
    A peculiar and intriguing film.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Has the high-octane feel of real life, closely observed.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    I think the answer is right there in the film, but less visible to American viewers because we are less class-conscious than the filmmakers.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    LaBute has that rarest of attributes, a distinctive voice. You know one of his scenes at once. His dialogue is the dialogue overheard in trendy mid-scale restaurants, with the words peeled back to suggest the venom beneath.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Sometimes we feel as if the film careens from one colorful event to another without respite, but sometimes it must have seemed to Frida Kahlo as if her life did, too.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    We might quarrel with the crucial decision at the end of Tully, but we have to honor it because we know it comes from a good place. So does the whole movie.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The writing, acting and direction are so convincing that at some point I stopped thinking about the constraints and started thinking about the movie's freedoms.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Jennifer Aniston has at last decisively broken with her "Friends" image in an independent film of satiric fire and emotional turmoil. It will no longer be possible to consider her in the same way.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Enormously entertaining for moviegoers of any age -- But for young women depressed because they don't look like skinny models, this film is a breath of common sense and fresh air. Real Women Have Curves is a reminder of how rarely the women in the movies are real.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie's performances have a simplicity and accuracy that is always convincing. Compston, who plays Liam, is a local 17-year-old discovered in auditions at his school. He has never acted before, but is effortlessly natural.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It has been a good long while since I have felt the presence of Evil so manifestly demonstrated as in the first appearance of Anthony Hopkins in The Silence of the Lambs.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    About Schmidt is billed as a comedy. It is funny to the degree that Nicholson is funny playing Schmidt, and funny in terms of some of his adventures, but at bottom it is tragic.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The characters have a weight and reality, as if Almodovar has finally taken pity on them--has seen that although their plights may seem ludicrous, they're real enough to hurt. These are people who stand outside conventional life and its rules, and yet affirm them.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Will this movie change anything, or this review make you want to see it? No, probably not. But when you come in tomorrow morning, someone will have emptied your wastebasket.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It's strange how the earlier movies fill in the gaps left by this one, and answer the questions. It is, I suspect, not even possible to understand this film without knowing the first two, and yet, knowing them, Part III works better than it should.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Antwone Fisher has a confrontation with his past, and a speech to the mother who abandoned him, and a reunion with his family, that create great, heartbreaking, joyous moments.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    LaBute likes people who think themselves into and out of love, and finds the truly passionate (like Blanche) to be the most dangerous. He likes romances that exist out of sight, denied, speculated about, suspected, fought against.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A brilliant and absurd film of "Titus Andronicus" that goes over the top, doubles back and goes over the top again.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The violence in this movie is gruesome (a scene involving the disposal of bodies is particularly graphic). But the movie has many human qualities and contains what will be remembered as one of Pacino's finest scenes.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    These are hard men. They could have the "Sopranos" for dinner, throw up and have them again.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    An intelligent, upbeat, happy movie.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    That it works is because of the high-energy animation, some genuinely beautiful visual concepts and a story that's a little more sensuous than we expect in animation.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    One of the best elements of the movie is in breaking free, he is respecting his father. This movie has deep values.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    We have all the action heroes and Method script-chewers we need right now, but the Cary Grant department is understaffed, and Hugh Grant shows here that he is more than a star, he is a resource.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    An enormously entertaining movie, like nothing we've ever seen before, and yet completely familiar.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    And the casting of minor characters (including Muriel's sister with the naughty-naughty smirk) is flawless.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The reconciliation at the end of the film is the one scene that doesn't work; a film that intrigues us because of its loose ends shouldn't try to tidy up.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The story is nuts-and-bolts space opera, without the intelligence and daring of, say, Steven Spielberg's ''A.I.'' But the look of the film is revolutionary. Final Fantasy is a technical milestone, like the first talkies or 3-D movies.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Some will find Dad's last big act in the movie too melodramatic. I think it follows from a certain logic, and leads to the very last shot, which is heartbreaking in its tenderness.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Now Singleton, too, dares to take a hard look at his community. His characters are a little older, and he is older, too, and less forgiving.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A black comedy in the tradition of David Lynch, Luis Bunuel and the Coens themselves...an assured piece of comic filmmaking.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Compulsively watchable and endlessly inventive as it transforms Broomfield's limited materials into a compelling argument.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A movie of introspection and defiance.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Reviewing The Naked Gun... is like reporting on a monologue by Rodney Dangerfield - you can get the words but not the music.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    One view of what happened that day, a very effective one. And as an act of filmmaking, it is superb: A sense of immediate and present reality permeates every scene.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Lee has a wealth of material here, and the film tumbles through it with exuberance.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Above all, the dialogue is complex enough to allow the characters to say what they're thinking: They are eloquent, insightful, fanciful, poetic when necessary. They're not trapped with cliches.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Watching this movie is like daydreaming.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    An astonishing achievement in imaginative filmmaking.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    By the end of Capturing the Friedmans, we have more information, from both inside and outside the family, than we dreamed would be possible. We have many people telling us exactly what happened. And we have no idea of the truth. None.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It is an immensely skillful sci-fi adventure, combining the usual elements: heroes and villains, special effects and stunts, chases and explosions, romance and oratory.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Finds the right notes to negotiate its delicate subject matter.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    If the film is perhaps a little slow in its middle passages, maybe that is part of the idea, too, to give us a sense of the leaden passage of time, before the glory of the final redemption.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Has a bracing truth that's refreshing after the phoniness of female-bonding pictures like "Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Watching the film, I thought of Michael Powell's great 1960 British thriller "Peeping Tom," which was about a photographer who killed his victims with a stiletto concealed in his camera. Sy uses a psychological stiletto, but he's the same kind of character.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    An action epic with the spirit of the Hollywood swordplay classics and the grungy ferocity of "The Road Warrior."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The actors assembled for Nicholas Nickleby are not only well cast, but well typecast. Each one by physical appearance alone replaces a page or more of Dickens' descriptions, allowing McGrath to move smoothly and swiftly through the story without laborious introductions.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Not a simpleminded movie in which merely being ABLE to read lips saves the day. In this brilliant sequence, she reads his lips and that ALLOWS them to set into motion a risky chain of events based on the odds that the bad guys will respond predictably.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Ruffalo plays the character with that elusive charm he also revealed in "You Can Count on Me."
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Pi
    The seductive thing about Aronofsky's film is that it is halfway plausible in terms of modern physics and math.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Aronofsky brings a new urgency to the drug movie by trying to reproduce, through his subjective camera, how his characters feel, or want to feel, or fear to feel.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    We like these people, which is important, and we are amused by them, which is helpful, but most of all we envy them, because they negotiate their romantic perplexities with such dash and style.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A meandering documentary, frustrating when Moskowitz has Mossman in his sights and still delays bagging him while talking to other sources. But at the end, we forgive his procrastination (and remember, with Laurence Sterne and Tristam Shandy that procrastination can be an art if it is done delightfully).
    • 40 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Walking in, I thought I knew what to expect, but i didn't anticipate how William Friedkin would jolt me with the immediate urgency of the action. This is not an arm's-length chase picture, but a close physical duel between its two main characters.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Maryam is more timely now than ever.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Starts at the beginning and goes straight through to the inevitable end, unblinkingly. It doesn't relieve the pressure, as "Iris" does, with flashbacks to happier days.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Rarely does a movie make you feel so warm and so uneasy at the same time.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Unlike most remakes, the Nolan "Insomnia" is not a pale retread, but a re-examination of the material, like a new production of a good play.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A movie with the nerve to end with melodramatic sentiment--and get away with it, because it means it. Expect lots of damp eyes in the audience.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Is alive, and takes chances, and uses the wicked blade of satire in order to show up the complacent political correctness of other movies in its campus genre.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It tells a full story with three acts, it introduces characters we get to know and care about, and it has something it passionately wants to say.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The key element in any action picture, I think, is a good villain. Terminator 2 has one, along with an intriguing hero and fierce heroine, and a young boy who is played by Furlong with guts and energy.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It is filled with good-hearted fun, with performances by actors who seem to be smacking their lips and by a certain true innocence that survives all of Reiner's satire.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    How can you make a movie about a man who cannot change, whose whole life is anchored and defended by routine? Few actors could get anywhere with this challenge, and fewer still could absorb and even entertain us with their performance, but Hoffman proves again that he almost seems to thrive on impossible acting challenges.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Forms a community that eventually envelops us.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Rousing in an old pulp science fiction sort of way, but the climactic scene transcends the rest, and stands by itself as one of the great animated action sequences.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    At the end of The Man Without a Past, I felt a deep but indefinable contentment. I'd seen a comedy that found its humor in the paradoxes of existence, in the way that things may work out strangely, but they do work out.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    One of those joyous films that leaps over national boundaries and celebrates universal human nature.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A movie so strange that it escapes entirely from the family genre and moves into fantasy. Like "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory," it has fearsome depths and secrets.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This is a movie for those who sometimes, in the stillness of the sleepless night, are so filled with hope and longing that they feel like -- well, like uttering wild goat cries to the moon. You know who you are.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie is all color and music, sound and motion, kinetic energy, broad strokes, operatic excess.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The Soderbergh version is like the same story freed from the weight of Tarkovsky's solemnity. And it evokes one of the rarest of movie emotions, ironic regret.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The film is exhilarating to watch because Sandler, liberated from the constraints of formula, reveals unexpected depths as an actor.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The Spanish Prisoner resembles Alfred Hitchcock in the way that everything takes place in full view, on sunny beaches and in brightly lit rooms, with attractive people smilingly pulling the rug out from under the hero and revealing the abyss.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The kind of caper movie that was made before special effects replaced wit, construction and intelligence. This movie is made out of fresh ingredients, not cake mix. Despite the twists of its plot, it is about its characters.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Sixty seconds of wondering if someone is about to kiss you is more entertaining than 60 minutes of kissing. By understanding that, Mamet is able to deliver a G-rated film that is largely about adult sexuality.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The film is unusual for not having a plot or a payoff.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The actors are gifted at establishing character with just a few well-chosen strokes (as a short story writer must also be able to do). We learn as much about each of these women in half an hour as we learn about most movie characters in two hours.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    I saw more important films at Sundance 2003, but none more purely enjoyable than Bend It Like Beckham, which is just about perfect as a teenage coming-of-age comedy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Rips up the postcards of American history and reassembles them into a violent, blood-soaked story of our bare-knuckled past.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie doesn't get all soppy at the end and is surprisingly unsentimental for a Disney animated feature. It keeps its edge and its comic zest all the way through, and although it arrives relatively unheralded, it's a jewel.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The final scene of the film contains an appearance and a revelation of astonishing emotional power; not since the last shots of "Schindler's List" have I been so overcome with the realization that real people, in recent historical times, had to undergo such inhumanity.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    To my surprise, Ratner does a sure, stylish job, appreciating the droll humor of Lecter's predicament, creating a depraved new villain in the Tooth Fairy (Ralph Fiennes), and using the quiet, intense skills of Norton to create a character whose old fears feed into his new ones. There is also humor, of the uneasy he-can't-get-away-with-this variety, in the character of a nosy scandal-sheet reporter (Philip Seymour Hoffman).
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The ending of the film is as calculated and cruel as a verbal assault by a Neil LaBute character.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A smart and funny movie, and the characters are in on the joke.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Manito sees an everyday tragedy with sadness and tenderness, and doesn't force it into the shape of a plot.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    For a movie audience, The Hours doesn't connect in a neat way, but introduces characters who illuminate mysteries of sex, duty and love.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie's races are thrilling because they must be thrilling; there's no way for the movie to miss on those, but writer-director Gary Ross and his cinematographer, John Schwartzman, get amazingly close to the action.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Once in the jungle they have all sorts of harrowing adventures, and I enjoyed it that real things were happening, that we were not simply looking at shoot-outs and chases, but at intriguing and daring enterprise.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    If quirky, independent, grown-up outsider filmmakers set out to make a family movie, this is the kind of movie they would make. And they did.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Yes, this is a comedy, but it's also sad, and finally it's simply a story about trying to figure out what you love to do and then trying to figure out how to do it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    If you have seen the masterful 2002 Brazilian film "City of God" or the 1981 film "Pixote," both about the culture of Rio's street people, then Bus 174 plays like a sad and angry real-life sequel.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    What's alluring is the way the characters played by John Livingston and Sabrina Lloyd savor each other, in between their troubles. Movies are too quick to interrupt romance with sex. Sarah and Rand fascinate us with their dance of dread and desire.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Most movie characters are like Greek gods and comic book heroes: We learn their roles and powers at the beginning of the story, and they never change. Here are complex, troubled, flawed people, brave enough to breathe deeply and take one more risk with their lives.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie is smart about journalism because it is smart about offices; the typical newsroom is open space filled with desks, and journalists are actors on this stage; to see a good writer on deadline with a big story is to watch not simply work but performance.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A remarkable documentary by two Irish filmmakers that is playing in theaters on its way to HBO. It is remarkable because the filmmakers, Kim Bartley and Donnacha O'Briain, had access to virtually everything that happened within the palace during the entire episode.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie's only flaw is also a virtue: It's jammed with characters, stories, warmth and laughs, until at times Curtis seems to be working from a checklist of obligatory movie love situations and doesn't want to leave anything out.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    What a sad film this, and how filled with the mystery of human life.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    As you listen to his uncanny narration of Tupac: Resurrection, which is stitched together from interviews, you realize you're not listening to the usual self-important vacancies from celebrity Q&As, but to spoken prose of a high order, in which analysis, memory and poetry come together seamlessly in sentences and paragraphs that sound as if they were written.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    To call it weird would be a cowardly evasion. It is creepy, eccentric, eerie, flaky, freaky, funky, grotesque, inscrutable, kinky, kooky, magical, oddball, spooky, uncanny, uncouth and unearthly. Especially uncouth.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A demented, twisted, unreasonably funny work of comic kamikaze style, starring Billy Bob Thornton as Santa in a performance that's defiantly uncouth.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The acting is on the money, the writing has substance, the direction knows when to evoke film noir and when (in a trick shot involving loaded dice) to get fancy.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Beautifully designed, intelligently written, acted with conviction, it's an uncommonly thoughtful epic. Its power is compromised only by an ending that sheepishly backs away from what the film is really about.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    [Keaton and Nicholson] bring so much experience, knowledge and humor to their characters that the film works in ways the screenplay might not have even hoped for.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    There is little enough psychological depth anywhere in the films, actually, and they exist mostly as surface, gesture, archetype and spectacle. They do that magnificently well, but one feels at the end that nothing actual and human has been at stake.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    tT never grow up is unspeakably sad, and this is the first Peter Pan where Peter's final flight seems not like a victory but an escape.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Why did it take me so long to see what was right there in front of my face -- that The Company is the closest that Robert Altman has come to making an autobiographical film?
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Gradually the full arc of Toni Collette's performance reveals itself, and we see that the end was there even in the beginning. This is that rare sort of film that is not about what happens, but about what happens then.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    No one should have to endure the life that Aileen Wuornos led, and we leave the movie believing that if someone, somehow, had been able to help that little girl, her seven victims would never have died.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Brave dissenting Islamic filmmakers are risking their lives to tell the story of the persecution of women, and it is a story worth knowing, and mourning.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The Tracker is one of those rare films that deserves to be called haunting. It tells the sort of story we might find in an action Western, but transforms it into a fable or parable.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It's sharp and funny--not a children's movie, but one of those hybrids that works on different levels for different ages.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The film had a curious effect on me. I was sometimes confused about events as they happened, but all the pieces are there, and the film creates an emotional whole. It's more effective when it's complete than during the unfolding experience.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The story, about an ant colony that frees itself from slavery to grasshoppers, is similar in some ways to the autumn's other big animated release, "Antz," but it's aimed at a broader audience and lacks the in-jokes.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    An uncommonly engaging comedy with ripe tragic undertones.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A surprisingly effective film, touching and knowing and, like Deneuve, ageless.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Lee uses visual imagination to lift his material into the realms of hopes and dreams.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    These opening scenes of Love and Death on Long Island are funny and touching, and Hurt brings a dignity to Giles De'Ath that transcends any snickering amusement at his infatuation.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A tight, taut thriller with a twist.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Despite jumping through the deliberately disorienting hoops of its story, Eternal Sunshine has an emotional center, and that's what makes it work.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A slick, scary, funny Creature Feature, beautifully photographed and splendidly acted in high adventure style.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    That it succeeds is some kind of miracle; there's enough material here for three bad films, and somehow it becomes one good one.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Picks and chooses cleverly, skipping blithely past the entire Russian Revolution but lingering on mad monks, green goblins, storms at sea, train wrecks and youthful romance.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Liv Tyler is a very particular talent who has sometimes been misused by directors more in love with her beauty than with her appropriateness for their story. Here she is perfectly cast.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This is a grand, confident entertainment, sure of the power of Adjani, Depardieu and the others, and sure of itself.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Never Die Alone is [Dickerson's] best work to date, with the complexity of serious fiction and the nerve to start dark and stay dark, to follow the logic of its story right down to its inevitable end.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    So breathtaking, so beautiful, so bold in its imagination, that it's a surprise at the end to find it doesn't finally deliver.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    One of those rare movies that's not only based on a comic book, but also feels like a comic book. It's vibrating with energy, and you can sense the zeal and joy in its making.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It somehow succeeds in taking those pop-culture brand names like Davy Crockett and Jim Bowie and giving them human form.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A high-spirited charmer, a fantasy that sparkles with delights.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    I'm Not Scared is a reminder of true childhood, of its fears and speculations, of the way a conversation can be overheard but not understood, of the way that the shape of the adult world forms slowly through the mist.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Mulan is an impressive achievement, with a story and treatment ranking with "Beauty and the Beast" and "The Lion King."
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This is an almost Dostoyevskian study of a man brooding upon evil until it paralyzes him.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The effect is strange and delightful; somehow the style lends quasi-credibility to a story that is entirely preposterous.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    After his murder, Michele Montas goes on the air to insist that Jean Dominique is still alive, because his spirit lives on. But in this film Haiti seems to be a country that can kill the spirit, too.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It's the film you need to see in order to understand why the ending of "As Good As It Gets" was phony.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A triumph of style over story, and of acting over characters.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Mamet's dialogue has a kind of logic, a cadence, that allows people to arrive in triumph at the ends of sentences we could not possibly have imagined. There is great energy in it. You can see the joy with which these actors get their teeth into these great lines.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Is Prisoner of Azkaban as good as the first two films? Not quite. It doesn't have that sense of joyously leaping through a clockwork plot, and it needs to explain more than it should. But the world of Harry Potter remains delightful, amusing and sophisticated.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    How much was legend, how much was pose, how much was real? I think it was all real, and the documentary suggests as much.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The Mother peers so fearlessly into the dark needs of human nature that you almost wish it would look away. It's very disturbing.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    An important film as well as an entertaining one.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The kind of film I more and more find myself seeking out, a film that seems alive in the sense that it appears to have free will; if, in the middle of a revenge tragedy, it feels like adding a suite for hoes and percussion, it does.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The director is Nick Cassavetes, son of Gena Rowlands and John Cassavetes, and perhaps his instinctive feeling for his mother helped him find the way past soap opera in the direction of truth.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A sweet and delicate comedy, a film to make you hold your breath, it is so precisely devised. It has big laughs, but it never seems to make an effort for them.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Brave, heartless, and exceedingly strange, a quasi-documentary in which the actor Maximilian Schell mercilessly violates the privacy of his older sister, Maria.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Mike Hodges' gritty new film noir I'll Sleep When I'm Dead begins in enigma and snakes its way into stark clarity.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A compelling, persuasive film, at odds with the White House effort to present Bush as a strong leader.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A musical and a biography, and brings to both of those genres a worldly sophistication that is rare in the movies.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The film has the materials for a lifetime project; like the "7-Up" series, this is a conversation that could be returned to every 10 years or so, as Celine and Jesse grow older.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Riding Giants is about altogether another reality. The overarching fact about these surfers is the degree of their obsession.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    One of the best-looking animated films ever made.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie has the freshness and urgency of life actually happening.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Colin Farrell is astonishing in the movie.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The training sequences are as they have to be: incredible rigors, survived by O'Neil. They are good cinema because Ridley Scott, the director, brings a documentary attention to them, and because Demi Moore, having bitten off a great deal here, proves she can chew it.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This is in many ways his most revealing film, his most painful, and if it also contains more than his usual quotient of big laughs, what was it the man said? "We laugh, that we may not cry."
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Movies like Hard Eight remind me of what original, compelling characters the movies can sometimes give us.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A love story about two strong-willed people who find exhilaration in testing each other. It is not about sexual love, or even romantic love, really, but about that kind of love based on challenge and fascination.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    We find we cannot take anything for face value in this story, that the motives of this woman and her husband are so deeply masked that even at the end of the film we are still uncertain about exactly what to believe, and why.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Sagan's novel Contact provides the inspiration for Robert Zemeckis' new film, which tells the smartest and most absorbing story about extraterrestrial intelligence since "Close Encounters of the Third Kind."
    • 61 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie's thriller elements are given an additional gloss by the skill of the technical credits, and the wicked wit of the dialogue.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    David Klass, the screenwriter, gives Freeman and Judd more specific dialogue than is usual in thrillers; they sound as if they might actually be talking with each other and not simply advancing plot points.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This is a rare thriller that's as much character study as sound and fury.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Rarely, but sometimes, a movie can have an actual physical effect on you. It gets under your defenses and sidesteps the "it's only a movie" reflex and creates a visceral feeling that might as well be real. Open Water had that effect on me.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie has a sweetness and tenderness for these characters, poor lambs, blissfully unaware that they're about to be flattened by World War II.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A visual poem of extraordinary beauty.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    By occupying their roles believably, by acting as we think their characters probably would, they save the movie from feeling like basic Hollywood action (even when it probably is). This is one of the year's best thrillers.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie's strength, then, is not in its outrage, but in its cynicism and resignation.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Because it is attentive to these human elements, Ladder 49 draws from the action scenes instead of depending on them. Phoenix, Travolta, Barrett and the others are given characters with dimension, so that what happens depends on their decisions, not on the plot.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This is one of the smartest and most provocative of science fiction films, a thriller with ideas.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    One of the more completely entertaining movies I've seen in a while--a well-crafted character study that, like a Hollywood movie with a skillful script, manipulates us but makes us like it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie demonstrates the power of sports to involve us; we don't live in Odessa and are watching a game played 16 years ago, and we get all wound up.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It is maddening, fascinating and completely successful.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Has the sort of headlong confidence the genre requires. Russell finds the strong central line all screwball begins with, the seemingly serious mission or quest, and then throws darts at a map of the United States as he creates his characters.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    An effective thriller precisely because it is true to the way sophisticated people might behave in this situation. Its characters are not movie creatures, gullible, emotional and quickly moved to tears. They're realists, rich, a little jaded.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Selena succeeds, through Lopez's performance, in evoking the magic of a sweet and talented young woman.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Surprisingly moving.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Pedro Almodovar's new movie is like an ingenious toy that is a joy to behold, until you take it apart to see what makes it work, and then it never works again.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Jeunet brings everything together -- his joyously poetic style, the lovable Tautou, a good story worth the telling -- into a film that is a series of pleasures stumbling over one another in their haste to delight us.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Grown-ups are likely to be surprised by how smart the movie is, and how sneakily perceptive.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie is a record by well-meaning people who try to make a difference for the better, and succeed to a small degree while all around them the horror continues unaffected.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Bacon is a strong and subtle actor, something that is often said but insufficiently appreciated. Here he employs all of his art.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Does the film have a message? I don't think it wants one. It is about the journey of a man going mad. A film can simply be a character study, as this one is.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Munch's screenplay is tenderly observant of his characters. He watches them as they float within the seas of their personalities. His scenes are short and often unexpected. The story unfolds in sidelong glances.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The strength of the picture, directed by Eastwood, is that it has three intersecting story arcs: The investigation, the health issues, and the relationship that builds, step by step.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Sean Penn('s) performances are master classes in the art of character development.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie's heart is in the right place.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It haunts you, you can't forget it, you admire its conception and are able to resolve some of the confusions you had while watching it.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The first film to build on the enormously influential "Pulp Fiction" instead of simply mimicking it. It has the games with time, the low-life dialogue, the absurd violent situations, but it also has its own texture.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Kidman is superb at making Suzanne into someone who is not only stupid, vain and egomaniacal (we've seen that before) but also vulnerably human.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Some of the gags don't work, and yet I laughed at the Farrellys' audacity in trying them. And the humor isn't just gags and punch lines, but one accomplished comic performance after another.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The end of the film understandably lays on the emotion a little heavily, but until then Courage Under Fire has been a fascinating emotional and logistical puzzle--almost a courtroom movie, with the desert as the courtroom.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    There are moments in Yagira's performance that will break your heart.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Lili Taylor plays Solanas as mad but not precisely irrational. She gives the character spunk, irony and a certain heroic courage.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    In The Wings of the Dove, there is a fascination in the way smart people try to figure one another out. The film is acted with great tenderness.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The writer and director, Michael Schorr, is making his first film, but has the confidence and simplicity of someone who has been making films forever.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie was directed by Ted Demme, with a light touch that allows the humor to survive in spite of the gloomy thoughts and the bleak, dark, frozen winter landscape.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    But Mimic is superior to most of its cousins, and has been stylishly directed by Guillermo Del Toro, whose visual sense adds a certain texture that makes everything scarier and more effective.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The bold long shot near the end of Dear Frankie allows the film to move straight as an arrow toward its emotional truth, without a single word or plot manipulation to distract us.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A ground-level documentary, messy and immediate, about the daily life of a combat soldier in Iraq. It is not pro-war or anti-war.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Not a war film so much as the story of a personality who has found the right role to play. Scott's theatricality is electrifying.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Like "Finding Nemo," this is a movie that is a joy to behold entirely apart from what it is about. It looks happy, and, more to the point, it looks harmonious.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Off the Map is visually beautiful as a portrait of lives in the middle of emptiness, but it's not about the New Mexico scenery. It's about feelings that shift among people who are good enough, curious enough or just maybe tired enough to let that happen.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie is dark, intense and disturbing.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    In its complexity and wit, this is one of his (Allen's) best recent films.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Antal's visuals create a haunted house where the lights are off in most of the rooms and there may, indeed, be a monster in the closet.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The thing about a movie like this is, the characters may be French, but they're more like people I know than they could ever be in the Hollywood remake.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie has been directed by the Farrelly brothers...Here, they're sensitive and warm-hearted, never push too hard, empathize with the characters, allow Lindsey and Ben to become people we care about.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    If the movie is a moral labyrinth, it is paradoxically straightforward and powerful in the moment; each individual story has an authenticity and impact of its own.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This is not a political documentary. It is a crime story. No matter what your politics, Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room will make you mad.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Better than "Gladiator" -- deeper, more thoughtful, more about human motivation and less about action.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    At once the most harrowing and, strangely, the most touching film I have seen about child abuse.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The central performance in Brothers is by Connie Nielsen, who is strong, deep and true.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Craig is fascinating here as a criminal who is very smart, and finds that is not an advantage because while you might be able to figure out what another smart person is about to do, dumbos like the men he works for are likely to do anything.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    What Mark does, better perhaps than either he or his father realizes, is to capture some aspects of a lifelong rivalry that involves love but not much contentment.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Episode III has more action per square minute, I'd guess, than any of the previous five movies, and it is spectacular. The special effects are more sophisticated than in the earlier movies, of course, but not necessarily more effective.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Jim Braddock is almost transparent in the simple goodness of his character; that must have made him almost impossible to play. Russell Crowe makes him fascinating, and it takes a moment of two of thought to appreciate how difficult that must have been.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A brave, funny, affecting film.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    King of the Corner is not plot-driven. It's like life: just one damned thing after another
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It's poignant to watch the chicks in their youth, fed by their parents, playing with their chums, the sun climbing higher every day, little suspecting what they're in for.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    These 1950s French noirs abandon the formality of traditional crime films, the almost ritualistic obedience to formula, and show crazy stuff happening to people who seem to be making up their lives as they go along.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Every good actor has a season when he comes into his own, and this is Terrence Howard's time.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A first-rate, slam-bang action thriller with a lot of style and no little humor.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    An astonishing film.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Cronenberg has made a movie that is pornographic in form, but not in result.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Surprisingly insightful, as buddy comedies go, and it has a good heart and a lovable hero.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Emily is played by Maggie Cheung with such intense desperation that she won the best actress award at Cannes 2004.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Watch Jan Decleir's performance. He never goes for the easy effect, never pushes too hard, is a rock-solid occupant of his character.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Keane is played by Damian Lewis. Here he inhabits an edge of madness that Lodge Kerrigan understands with a fierce sympathy.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Then I realized the movie's point is that someone like this nerdy Harvard boy might be transformed in a fairly short time into a bloodthirsty gang fighter. The message is that violence is hard-wired into men, if only the connection is made.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A bleak comedy, funny in a "Catch-22" sort of way, and at the same time an angry outcry against the gun traffic.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A film that grows in reflection. The first time I saw it, I was hurtling down the tracks of a goofy ethnic comedy when suddenly we entered dark and dangerous territory. I admired the film but did not sufficiently appreciate its arc.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie's excellence comes from Foster's performance as a resourceful and brave woman; from Bean, Sarsgaard and the members of the cabin crew, all with varying degrees of doubt; from the screenplay by Peter A. Dowling and Billy Ray; and from the direction by Robert Schwentke.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This movie is knowledgeable about the city and the people who make accommodations with it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Seems deceptively straightforward, coming from a director with Cronenberg's quirky complexity. But think again. This is not a movie about plot, but about character.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Polanski's film is visually exact and detailed without being too picturesque. This is not Ye Olde London, but Ye Harrowing London, teeming with life and dispute.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Avoids obvious sentiment and predictable emotion and shows this woman somehow holding it together year after year, entering goofy contests that for her family mean life and death.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    All I know is, it is better to be the whale than the squid. Whales inspire major novels.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    But if the movie were simply the story of this event, it would be no more than a sad record. What makes it more is the way it shows how racism breeds and feeds, and is taught by father to son.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    George Tillman says Soul Food is based in part on his own family, and I believe him, because he seems to know the characters so well; by the film's end, so do we.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It walks and talks like a big budget horror film, heavy on special effects and pitched at the teenage audience, and maybe that's how it will be received. But it's more impressive if you ignore the genre and just look at what's on the screen.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Movies like this embrace goofiness with an almost sensual pleasure.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Wallace and Gromit are arguably the two most delightful characters in the history of animation.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Starts out with the materials of an ordinary movie and becomes a rather special one.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    In D.J. Caruso's Two for the Money, you can see Al Pacino doing something he's done a lot lately: Having a terrific time being an actor.