For 4,115 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 75% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 23% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Mr. Death: The Rise and Fall of Fred A. Leuchter, Jr.
Lowest review score: 0 The Life of David Gale
Score distribution:
4115 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Entertaining and surprisingly amusing, under the circumstances. The film is in a better state of mind than its characters. Its humor comes, as the best humor does, from an acute observation of human nature.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The key to the film is in the character of David. One can imagine a scenario in which an overbearing father drives the son to rebellion, but what happens here is more complex and sinister.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A rather brilliant lump of coal for your stocking hung by the fireside with care. How else to explain an R-rated Santa Claus origin story crossed with "The Thing"?
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Derek Cianfrance, the film's writer and director, observes with great exactitude the birth and decay of a relationship. This film is alive in its details.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Giamatti's performance is one of those achievements. He is making a career of playing unremarkable but memorable men.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Chabrol as always shows a tenderness toward the lives of people who are exceptional only because crime touches them.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Lee doesn't make exploitation films, and he doesn't find conventional answers. He is puzzled by the mysteries of inexplicable behavior.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    I Will Follow doesn't tell a story so much as try to understand a woman. Through her, we can find insights into the ways we deal with death.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Good in so many subtle ways, I despair of doing them justice.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    He's (Fukunaga) a director with a sure visual sense, here expressed in voluptuous visuals and ambitious art direction.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    For me, it is too clever by half, creating full-bodied characters but inserting them into a story that is thin soup.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    An ingenious thriller that comes billed as science fiction, although its science is preposterous.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Here we have an odd cross between a fairy tale and a high-tech action movie. It could have been a fairly strained attempt at either, but director Joe Wright ("Atonement") combines his two genres into a stylish exercise that perversely includes some sentiment and insight.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    If you are open, even in fancy, to the idea of ghosts who visit the living, this film is likely to be a curious but rather bemusing experience.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Most people do not choose their religions but have them forced upon themselves by birth, and the lesson of Incendies is that an accident of birth is not a reason for hatred.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Spellbinding.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Siskel and Jacobs focus on the performances, which are inspiring and electrifying.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    What I enjoyed was the way the film summons up the pure obsessive passion that chess stirs in some people.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    He is one of the most prolific and generous of directors, and there is no word that summarizes a "Tavernier film," except, usually, masterful.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Bridesmaids seems to be a more or less deliberate attempt to cross the Chick Flick with the Raunch Comedy. It definitively proves that women are the equal of men in vulgarity, sexual frankness, lust, vulnerability, overdrinking and insecurity.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Meek's Cutoff is more an experience than a story. It has personality conflicts, but isn't about them. The suspicions and angers of the group are essentially irrelevant to their overwhelming reality. Reichardt has the courage to establish that.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Owen Wilson is a key to the movie's appeal. He makes Gil so sincere, so enthusiastic.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The animation is elegant, the story is much more involving than in the original, and there's boundless energy.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The film is terrifically entertaining, an ambitious big-budget epic, directed with great visuals and sound by Takeshi Miike.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A wonderful film, nostalgia not for a time but for a style of filmmaking, when shell-shocked young audiences were told a story and not pounded over the head with aggressive action.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    One of the pleasures of Beginners is the warmth and sincerity of the major characters. There is no villain. They begin by wanting to be happier and end by succeeding.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Submarine isn't an insipid teen sex comedy. It flaunts some stylistic devices, such as titles and sections and self-aware narration, but it doesn't try too hard to be desperately clever.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Here is a film that invites philosophical musing. Made without dialogue and often in long shots, it regards the four stages of existence in a remote Italian village.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Cars 2 is fun. Whether that's because John Lasseter is in touch with his inner child or mine, I cannot say.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Funny and dirty in about that order.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The performances are pitch perfect, even including Gabriel Chavarria as Ramon, the man who steals the truck. It adds an important element to the film that he embodies a desperate man, not a bad one.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie suggests that humans benefitted little from Project Nim, and Nim himself not at all.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This movie is impressively staged, the dialogue is given proper weight and not hurried through, there are surprises which, in hindsight, seem fair enough, and "Harry Potter" now possesses an end that befits the most profitable series in movie history.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It's manipulative, yes, but clever and persuasive in its manipulations.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    What's impressive is how well this film joins its parts into a whole.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The Guard is a pleasure. I can't tell if it's really (bleeping) dumb or really (bleeping) smart, but it's pretty (bleeping) good.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    On the surface, this film is an enchanting meditation. At its core is the hard steel of individuality.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    For 20 years the news has reported from time to time of crimes alleged by employees of paid defense contractors. These cases rarely seem to result in change, and the stories continue. We can only guess what may be going unreported. The Whistleblower offers chilling evidence of why that seems to be so.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A slick, exciting, well-made crime thriller, dripping with atmosphere.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This is a very good haunted house film. It milks our frustration deliciously.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    There are no heavy-handed portraits of holy rollers here, just people whose view of the world is narrow. There are also no outsize sinners, just some gentle singer-songwriters who are too fond of pot and whose lyrics are parades of cliches.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie is an uncommonly knowledgeable portrait of the way musical gifts could lift people of ordinary backgrounds into high circles.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Rod Lurie has made a first-rate film of psychological warfare, and yes, I thought it was better than Peckinpah's. Marsden, Bosworth and Skarsgard are all persuasive, and although James Woods has played a lot of evil men during his career, this one may be the scariest.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The entire film, in fact, seems much more real than the usual action-crime-chase concoctions we've grown tired of. Here is a movie with respect for writing, acting and craft. It has respect for knowledgable moviegoers.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    I got a little lost while watching Mysteries of Lisbon and enjoyed the experience. It's a lavish, elegant, operatic, preposterous 19th century melodrama, with characters who change names and seemingly identities, and if you could pass a quiz on its stories within stories, you have my admiration.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    On the basis of its scale, energy and magical events, this is the Hong Kong equivalent of a big-budget Hollywood blockbuster. But it transcends them with the stylization of the costumes, the panoply of the folklore, the richness of the setting, and the fact that none of the characters (allegedly) have superpowers.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Like another recent feel-good film about the disease, Gus Van Sant's "Restless," it creates a comforting myth. That's one of the things movies are good for.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Margin Call employs an excellent cast who can make financial talk into compelling dialogue. They also can reflect the enormity of what is happening: Their company and their lives are being rendered meaningless.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Because of the ingenious screenplay by John Orloff, precise direction by Roland Emmerich and the casting of memorable British actors, you can walk into the theater as a blank slate, follow and enjoy the story, and leave convinced - if of nothing else - that Shakespeare was a figure of compelling interest.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A linear story, or one that was fragmented more clearly, could have been more effective. Still, a good film, ambitious and effective, introducing a gifted young actress and a director whose work I'll anticipate.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    As a period biopic, J. Edgar is masterful. Few films span seven decades this comfortably.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    If I were choosing a director to make a film about the end of the world, von Trier the gloomy Dane might be my first choice. The only other name that comes to mind is Werner Herzog's. Both understand that at such a time silly little romantic subplots take on a vast irrelevance.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie seems to be a fairly accurate re-creation of the making of a film at Pinewood Studios at that time. It hardly matters. What happens during the famous week hardly matters. What matters is the performance by Michelle Williams.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The film, written and directed by Joe Maggio, only has this handful of characters and looks at them carefully. The dialogue is right, the conflicts are simple and sincere, the hopes are touching.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    There's a freedom in his structure. This isn't a formal documentary, but as I mentioned, a meander.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This isn't the kind of movie that even has hope enough to contain a message. There is no message, only the reality of these wounded personalities.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Patton Oswalt is, in a way, the key to the film's success. Theron is flawless at playing a cringe-inducing monster and Wilson touching as a nice guy who hates to offend her, but the audience needs a point of entry, a character we can identify with, and Oswalt's Matt is human, realistic, sardonic and self-deprecating. He speaks truth to Mavis.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Set aside your memories of the Conan Doyle stories, save them to savor on a night this winter and enjoy this movie as a high-caliber entertainment.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A terrific thriller with action sequences that function as a kind of action poetry.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The film's value is in its portrait of Ruth, and her independence as a solo outsider in a vast, uncaring city.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Using a dialogue-heavy approach that's unusual for Cronenberg, his film is skilled at the way it weaves theory with the inner lives of its characters. We are learning, yet never feel we're being taught.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Under the direction of David Fincher and with a screenplay by Steven Zaillian. I don't know if it's better or worse. It has a different air.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It evokes Saturday afternoon serials in an age when most of the audience will never have seen one. I was surprised by how much I enjoyed myself.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    War Horse is bold, not afraid of sentiment and lets out all the stops in magnificently staged action sequences. Its characters are clearly defined and strongly played by charismatic actors. Its message is a universal one.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    So what we're seeing here is the emergence of a promising writer-director, an actor and a cinematographer who are all exciting, and have cared to make a film that seeks helpful truths.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This is one of the most fascinating of all true crime stories.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    I watched the film in a sort of reverie. The dancers seemed particularly absorbed. They had performed these dances many times before, but always with Pina Bausch present. Now they were on their own, in homage.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Sit through the entire credits. There's one more shot still to come. Not that you wouldn't be content without it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Tomboy is tender and affectionate. It shows us Laure/Mikael in an adventure that may be forgotten in adulthood or may form her adulthood.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    One of the pleasures of Fiennes' film is that the screenplay by John Logan ("Hugo," "Gladiator") makes room for as much of Shakespeare's language as possible. I would have enjoyed more, because such actors as Fiennes, Vanessa Redgrave and Brian Cox let the words roll trippingly off the tongue.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    No one, male or female, has any fun, but the men behave as if they do. They are all half-stupefied by the languor in which they drown.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    John Trank's Chronicle grows into an uncommonly entertaining movie that involves elements of a superhero origin story, a science-fic­tion fantasy and a drama about a disturbed teenager.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The music is terrific. Idania Valdes dubs Rita's sensuous, smoky singing voice, and the film is essentially constructed as a musical.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    In its closing scenes, Hell and Back Again builds to an emotional and stylistic power that we didn't see coming.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This is a parable about modern Iran, and like many recent Iranian films it leaves its meaning to the viewer. One of the wise decisions by Rafi Pitts, its writer, director and star, is to include no dialogue that ever actually states the politics of its hero.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Undefeated is an emotional and effective film.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Nuri Bilge Ceylan, one of Turkey's best directors, has a deep understanding of human nature. He loves his characters and empathizes with them. They deserve better than to be shuttled around in a facile plot. They deserve empathy. So do we all.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The film is a chilling study of an evil, dominant personality and his victims. It works primarily through an astonishingly good performance by Daniel Henshall as Bunting.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The most mysterious character in The Kid With a Bike is not the kid, who after all, has a story it's fairly easy to understand. It is the hairdresser, played by Cecille De France with her sad beauty. This actress carries lifetimes in her eyes.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The film most of all is about Hester, who stares out the window and smokes.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Despite its flashy cinematography and colorful sets, it contains a great deal that is serious about growing up in America today.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Little by little, detail by detail, This Is Not a Film leads to a final scene of overwhelming power. I don't think it was even planned - no more than Panahi expected the little actress to take the cast off her arm. It simply happens, and then the film is over, having nothing more to say. Because, after all, it is not a film.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Fake It So Real filled me with affection for its down-and-out heroes, a group of semi-pro wrestlers in Lincolnton, N.C.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Marley, an ambitious and comprehensive film, does what is probably the best possible job of documenting an important life.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    There are elements of comedy here, and some very low-key slapstick, but the film is respectful to the Catholic Church and the papacy and takes no cheap shots.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    One of the qualities of Monsieur Lazhar is that it has no simple questions and simple answers. Its purpose is to present us with a situation, explore the people involved and show us a man who is dealing with his own deep hurts.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Boy
    A film like this would have little chance without the right casting, and James Rolleston is so right as Boy, it's difficult to imagine anyone else.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    We suspect that the film will be about their various problems and that the hotel will not be as advertised. What we may not expect is what a charming, funny and heartwarming movie this is, a smoothly crafted entertainment that makes good use of seven superb veterans.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    I had to forget what I knew about Black. He creates this character out of thin air, it's like nothing he's done before, and it proves that an actor can be a miraculous thing in the right role.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Surviving Progress is a bright, entertaining (!), coherent argument in favor of these principles I have simplified so briefly. It's self-evident and tells the truth.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It's not often a thriller keeps me wound up as well as Headhunters did. I knew I was being manipulated and didn't care. It was a pleasure to see how well it was being done.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Snow White and the Huntsman reinvents the legendary story in a film of astonishing beauty and imagination.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Yes, we know these events are less than likely, and the film's entire world is fantastical. But what happens in a fantasy can be more involving than what happens in life, and thank goodness for that.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The brothers Maeda are pure gold; the film captures what feels like effortless joy in their lives, and it is never something they seem to be reaching for.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Safety Not Guaranteed not only has dialogue that's about something, but characters who have some depth and dimension.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Someone like Abe could only prevail through the powers of denial and optimistic wishing, and Solondz makes that happen, as the film gradually slips into fantasy.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Linda is a truly good woman, and Rachael Harris' performance illuminates Natural Selection.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Tom has enlisted our identification and sympathy, but he seems hopelessly isolated within his own bubble of despair. How much that happens is in his mind?
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Ted
    The funniest movie character so far this year is a stuffed teddy bear. And the best comedy screenplay so far is Ted, the saga of the bear's friendship with a 35-year-old manchild.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This is a more thoughtful film, and its action scenes are easier to follow in space and time. If we didn't really need to be told Spidey's origin story again, at least it's done with more detail and provides better reasons for why Peter Parker throws himself into his superhero role.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie finds the right tone to present its bittersweet wisdom. It's relaxed. It's content to observe and listen.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A return to form for Stone's dark side, Savages generates ruthless energy and some, but not too much, humor.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    As a melodrama, Trishna builds a hypnotic force.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Benoit Jacquot's engrossing film tells a story we know well, seen from a point of view we may not have considered.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The Mexican drug cartels have inspired countless films, but never one as final as Natalia Almada's documentary El Velador.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    In Sacrifice, about a father who loses his son to the power of the state, it is difficult to miss the parallels with Chen's own life.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Some of Jackie's dialogue is so good it would distinguish a sitcom.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    I'm not surprised that Rashida Jones took the lead in writing this screenplay; the way things are going now, if an actress doesn't write a good role for herself, no one else is going to write one.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    What makes the film involving is that it doesn't depend on the mechanical resolution of the plot, but on the close observation of its effects on these distinctive characters.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Jennifer Garner and Joel Edgerton are appealing together as far from perfect parents, and CJ Adams has that ability of so many child actors to be pitch-perfect.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Why Stop Now takes large themes much manhandled as movie cliches, and treats them with care and respect. It likes the characters. So did I.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    What impresses me more is that she (Delpy) has a lighthearted way about her and takes chances in comedies like this. It is hard enough to be good at all, but to be good in comedy speaks for your character.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    There's a lot of funny stuff, but the most unexpected comes from Arnold, who has been uneven, to say the least, in his movies.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    You're looking for depth and profundity, this is the wrong movie. But under the direction of David Koepp ("Secret Window," the screenplays for "Mission: Impossible" and "Spider-Man"), this is an expert and spellbinding adventure.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Like "The Exorcist," the best film in the genre, it is inspired by some degree of religious scholarship and creates believable characters in a real world. That religions take demonic possessions seriously makes them more fun for us, the unpossessed.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Cluzot, with his uncanny resemblance to Dustin Hoffman, is an engaging actor who effortlessly summons up inner neurosis. The others are all skilled at light wit and banter; in a way, the film is simply a record of the French being French.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    I like this movie. More important, I like Mike Birbiglia in it. Whether he has a future in stand-up I cannot say, but he has a future as a monologist and actor.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    There's a universal story here about immigrant parents and children, and how American culture can swamp family traditions, and make parents and children culturally unrecognizable to one another.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    There is a word to explain why this particular film so appealed to me. Reader, that word is "escapism." If you understand why I used the word "reader" in just that way, you are possibly an ideal viewer for this movie.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The most heartbreaking scene shows survivors of the dead reaching through fence railings to scatter their ashes on the White House lawn, where presumably they still rest.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This film leads to a startling conclusion that wipes out the story's paradoxes so neatly it's as if it never happened. You have to grin at the ingenuity of Johnson's screenplay.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It offers the rare pleasure of an author directing his own book, and doing it well. No one who loves the book will complain about the movie, and especially not about its near-ideal casting.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    When we speak of "American health care," we should in fact be calling it "American sickness care." There's more money to be made in making people sick and healing them than in keeping them well in the first place. The documentary Escape Fire: The Fight to Rescue American Healthcare makes this argument with stunning clarity.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The Well Digger's Daughter is such a success that Auteuil has already been signed to direct three more Pagnol classics, and I eagerly want to see them.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Jarecki's film makes a shattering case against the War on Drugs.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This is a delightfully goofy, self-aware movie that knows it is a movie.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Now, Forager is a uncompromising film about two people who don't deserve each other - but maybe nobody deserves either one of them.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    One of the most involving of the many first-rate thrillers that have come recently from Scandinavia.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This performance, unlike anything Paul Dano has ever done, must have required some courage. It requires an actor to cast aside all conceits of performance, presence, charisma and even timing.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It is unabashedly sentimental and epic, and rather bold in the way it takes place during and after the Holocaust but is not defined by it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This is a serious movie about drinking but not a depressing one. You notice that in the way it handles Charlie (Aaron Paul), Kate's husband. He is also her drinking buddy. When two alcoholics are married, they value each other's company because they know they can expect forgiveness and understanding, while a civilian might not choose to share their typical days.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Mark is played by John Hawkes, who has emerged in recent years as an actor of amazing versatility. What he does here is not only physically challenging, but requires timing and emotion to elevate the story into realms of deep feeling and, astonishingly, even comedy.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    By dropping in on this couple from time to time for the kinds of moments one of them might remember, the film is more honest than its characters.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    When the mistake is discovered, how do the families react? What disturbs them more: that their son has been raised as an enemy or that he has been raised in another religion? That's where The Other Son gets complicated.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Katie Dellamaggiore's inspiring documentary covers two years in the history of the school chess team, during which one team member, Rochelle Ballantyn, approaches her dream of becoming the first female African-American grandmaster in U.S history.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Is something being hidden? No. It's more that something doesn't want to be known.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A Late Quartet does one of the most interesting things any film can do. It shows how skilled professionals work.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It's not dated. It is powerful, genuinely shocking and rather amazing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A big budget historical drama that carries Denmark's hopes into the Oscar season. It provides still more exposure for the rising Danish star Mads Mikkelsen, the latest male sex symbol of the art house crowd.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Here is a film that is exasperating, frustrating, anarchic and in a constant state of renewal. It's not tame. Some audience members are going to grow very restless. My notion is, few will be bored.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Melissa Leo plays her without inflection, giving us no instructions about what our opinion should be. It is a brave performance, an act of empathy with a sad woman.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    We're fully aware of the plot conventions at work here, the wheels and gears churning within the machinery, but with these actors, this velocity and the oblique economy of the dialogue, we realize we don't often see it done this well. Silver Linings Playbook is so good, it could almost be a terrific old classic.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Given the grievousness of their sins, one wonders why the church continues to shelter them. Might it not be more appropriate to excommunicate them, and refer them to the attention of the civil authorities?
    • 61 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Few actors have played a wider variety of characters, and even fewer have done it without making it seem like a stunt.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Fat Kid Rules the World is a movie with a title that might be misleading: It's a lot better than it sounds like it has any right to be.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The case transfixed a racially polarized New York City. The teens were labeled as a "wolf pack" by the news media, led by the New York tabloids.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This isn't a serious historical film. It plays different instruments than Spielberg's "Lincoln." Murray, who has a wider range than we sometimes realize, finds the human core of this FDR and presents it tenderly.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Part of the greatness of this film is that it not only avoids any simple answers, but it also takes us into the awkward contradictions and internal dishonesties that help us look at the mirror each day.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Sometimes it's all about the casting. The notice of a screening came around, I read the names Al Pacino, Christopher Walken and Alan Arkin, and it didn't matter in a way what the movie was about - although it didn't hurt that it was a crime movie.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Imagine music for a sorcery-related plot and then dial it down to ominous forebodings. Without Thomas Newman's score, Side Effects would be a lesser film, even another film.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie, in fact, resembles Capra's "It's a Wonderful Life" more than other, conventional time-travel movies.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Because Die Hard 2 is so skillfully constructed and well-directed, it develops a momentum that carries it past several credibility gaps that might have capsized a lesser film.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    There's an unlikelihood so large in Future Weather that it nearly derails the film. That was what I admired the most about it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This is easily the most absurd of the "Star Trek" stories - and yet, oddly enough, it is also the best, the funniest and the most enjoyable in simple human terms. I'm relieved that nothing like restraint or common sense stood in their way.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    There will be many who find To the Wonder elusive and too effervescent. They'll be dissatisfied by a film that would rather evoke than supply. I understand that, and I think Terrence Malick does, too. But here he has attempted to reach more deeply than that: to reach beneath the surface, and find the soul in need.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Altman's approach in Vincent & Theo is a very immediate, intimate one. He would rather show us things happening than provide themes and explanations. He is most concerned with the relationship that made the art possible.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It's one of those films where you feel the authority right away: This movie knows its characters, knows its story, and knows exactly how it wants to tell us about them.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The charm of Bagdad Cafe is that every character and every moment is unanticipated, obscurely motivated, of uncertain meaning and vibrating with life.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It is a stunning work of visual style - the best version of a comic book universe I've seen - and Brandon Lee clearly demonstrates in it that he might have become an action star, had he lived.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    F/X
    This movie takes a lot of delight in being more psychologically complex than it has to be. It contains fights and shootouts and big chase scenes, but they're all firmly centered on who the characters are and what they mean to one another.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    There are some moments in The Witches of Eastwick that stretch uncomfortably for effects - the movie's climax is overdone, for example - and yet a lot of the time this movie plays like a plausible story about implausible people. The performances sell it. And the eyebrows.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Ghostbusters is one of those rare movies where the original, fragile comic vision has survived a multimillion-dollar production.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The plot of Point Blank, summarized, invites parody (rookie agent goes undercover as surfer to catch bank robbers). The result is surprisingly effective.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The experience is frightening, sometimes disgusting, and (if the truth be told) exhilarating. This is very skillful filmmaking, and Mad Max 2 is a movie like no other.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Not very much happens in Metropolitan, and yet everything that happens is felt deeply, because the characters in this movie are still too young to have perfected their defenses against life.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It is a great performance by Danny Glover, the portrait of a proud man who discovers his pride was entrusted to the wrong things.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie isn't a comic book that's been assembled out of the spare parts from other crime movies; it's an original, in-depth look at this world, written and directed with concern—apparently after a lot of research and inside information.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Little Man Tate is the kind of movie you enjoy watching; it's about interesting people finding out about themselves.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The Chaser is an expert serial-killer film from South Korea and a poster child for what a well-made thriller looked like in the classic days.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Think of how we read the thoughts of those closest to us, in moments when words will not do. We look at their faces, and although they do not make any effort to mirror emotions there, we can read them all the same, in the smallest signs. A movie that invites us to do the same thing can be very absorbing.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    All of these films approach their subjects with such irony that we cannot take them at face value; "White" is the anti-comedy, in between the anti-tragedy and the anti-romance.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    There is a long central section in the film which is a triumph of narrative technique.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The film uses a slice-of-life approach to create a docudrama of chilling horror.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Space Jam is a happy marriage of good ideas--three films for the price of one, giving us a comic treatment of the career adventures of Michael Jordan, crossed with a Looney Tunes cartoon and some showbiz warfare.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Warm-hearted and effective.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    For a grimmer and more realistic look at this world, no modern movie has surpassed Karel Reisz's "The Gambler'' (1974), starring James Caan in a screenplay by self-described degenerate gambler James Toback.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The comedy here isn't all on the surface, and Viterelli [the bodyguard Jelly] is one reason why.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    May be pitching itself to the wrong audience. The ads promise: "The Rhythm ... the Beat ... the Love ... and You Don't Stop!" But it's not a musical and although it's sometimes a comedy, it's observant about its people.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Strong performances, particularly by Glenn as the hard-bitten climber with a private agenda, Vertical Limit delivers.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    In this movie the war is not quite over. For those who survived it, maybe it will never be.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    If it proves nothing else, this movie establishes that it is impossible for a film to get the NC-17 rating from the MPAA for language alone. This takes the trophy for dirty talk, and I've seen the docs by Richard Pryor, Eddie Murphy and Andrew Dice Clay.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    What it doesn't have is a narrative magnet to pull us through - a story line that makes us really care what happens, aside from the elegant but mechanical manipulations of the plot.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Only movie lovers who have marinated their imaginations in the great B movies from RKO and Republic will recognize The Hot Spot as a superior work in an old tradition - as a manipulation of story elements as mannered and deliberate, in its way, as variations on a theme for the piano.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie is not a special effects extravaganza like "The Grinch," but in a way that's a relief. It's more about charm and silliness than about great hulking multimillion-dollar high-tech effects.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie worked for me right up to the final scene, and then it caved in.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The point of the movie is not the plot, but the character and the atmosphere.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    [Lillard's] performance dominates the film, and he does a subtle, tricky job of being both an obnoxious punk and a kid in search of his direction in life. He's very good.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Has the courage to work without a net, aware that when you're a teenager, your life is not a story so much as a million possible stories.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    I was entertained, and yet I felt a little empty-handed at the end, as if an enormous effort had been spent on making these dinosaurs seem real, and then an even greater effort was spent on undermining the illusion.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A screwball film noir with a lot of medium laughs and a few great big ones,
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    There is a kind of pleasure to be had from its directness, from its lack of gimmicks, from its classical form. And just like in the Warners pictures, there is also the pleasure of supporting performances from character actors who come onstage, sing an aria, and leave.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    There is not much here that comes as a blinding plot revelation, but the movie has a raffish charm and good-hearted characters, and like "The Full Monty" it makes good use of the desperation beneath the comedy.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie has nowhere much to go and nothing much to prove, except that Stephen King is correct and if you can devise the right characters and the right situation, the plot will take care of itself -- or not, as the case may be.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Low-key, understated style. The suspense beats away underneath.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A lightweight charmer with a winning performance by Robin Tunney.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Altman would never admit this, but I believe Dr. T, the gynecologist in his latest film, is an autobiographical character.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A raw, wounding, powerfully acted film, and you cannot look away from it.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The heart of the movie is in the Spacey performance, and in knowing that less is more, he plays Prot absolutely matter-of-factly.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The story, based on an 18th century French play by Pierre Marivaux, is the sort of thing that inspired operas and Shakespeare comedies: It's all premise, no plausibility, and so what?
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Has laughs, thrills, wit and scary monsters, and is one of those goofy movies like "Critters" that kids itself and gets away with it.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Right now, she's like the grade-school girl at the spin-the-bottle party who changes the rules when the bottle points at her.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    What I like about the movie is its combination of suspense and intelligence. If it does not quite explain exactly how decryption works (how could it?), it at least gives us a good idea of how decrypters work, and we understand how crucial Bletchley was -- so crucial its existence was kept a secret for 30 years.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A funny movie that only gets funnier the more familiar you are with the James Bond movies, all the Bond clones and countless other 1960s films.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It is fairly lighthearted, under the circumstances; like "Catch-22," it enjoys the paradoxes that occur when you try to apply logic to war.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Mantegna gives us just enough detail, enough exterior shots, so that we feel we're on a ship. All the rest is conversation and idleness. The lake boat is a lot like life.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The music probably sounds fine on a CD. Certainly it is well-rehearsed. But the overall sense of the film is of good riddance to a bad time.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie is bright, the dialogue has wit and intelligence, and Roberts and Grant are very easy to like. By the end, as much as we're aware of the ancient story machinery groaning away below deck, we're smiling.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    More evolved, more confident, more sure-footed in the way it marries minimal character development to seamless action.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Guy Ritchie, who started out as such an innovator in "Lock, Stock, etc.," seems to have headed directly for reliable generic conventions as a producer. But they are reliable, and have become conventions for a reason: They work. Mean Machine is what it is, and very nicely, too.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Feels a little uncertain, as if it's moving from present to past under the demands of a screenplay rather than because it really feels that way. But the growing-up stuff is kind of wonderful.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    My guess is that the average firefighter, like the average American moviegoer, might sort of enjoy the movie, which is a skillfully made example of your typical Schwarzenegger action film.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It's is not a great high school movie like "Election," but it's alive and risky and saucy.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It's a close call here. I guess I recommend the movie because the dramatic scenes are worth it. But if some studio executive came along and made Stone cut his movie down to two hours, I have the strangest feeling it wouldn't lose much of substance and might even play better.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    If you see only one martial arts Western this year (and there is probably an excellent chance of that), this is the one.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The heart of the film is in the performances of Danes and Beckinsale after they're sent to prison.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Meg Ryan does this sort of thing about as well as it can possibly be done, and after "Sleepless in Seattle" and "You've Got Mail," here is another ingenious plot that teases us with the possibility that true love will fail, while winking that, of course, it will prevail.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The Shapiros wisely focus on the mystery of this man, who was spectacularly ill-prepared for both of his jungle journeys, and apparently walked away from civilization prepared to rely on the kindness of strangers.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It's remarkable, a war story told as a chess game where the loser not only dies, but goes by necessity to an unmarked grave.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    How can one man juggle two women, possible expulsion, Mafia baseball bats and the meaning of life, while on acid? This is the kind of question only a Toback film thinks to ask, let alone answer.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    To watch Samuel L. Jackson in the role is to realize again what a gifted actor he is, how skilled at finding the right way to play a character who, in other hands, might be unplayable.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Eight different characters, all played by Murphy, all convincing, each with its own personality. This is not just a stunt. It is some kind of brilliance.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    One of the things I like about the movie is the wit of its dialogue, the way sentences and conversations coil with confidence up to a conclusion that is totally unexpected.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is the second movie Judd and Freeman have made together (after "Kiss the Girls" in 1997). They're both good at projecting a kind of Southern intelligence that knows its way around the frailties of human nature.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie treads a dangerous line. There are times when its ferocity threatens to break through the boundaries of comedy - to become so unremitting we find we cannot laugh.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Movies like this renew my faith that the future of the cinema lies not in the compromises of digital projection, but by leaping over the limitations of digital into the next generation of film technology.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    We're swept up in the story's need to find a happy ending.
    • Chicago Sun-Times
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    She is also, we sense, a woman of great generosity of spirit, and a TV natural: The star she most reminds me of is Lucille Ball.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The most ingenious device in the story is the way Chow and Su play-act imaginary scenes between their cheating spouses.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    One of the delights of The Taste of Others is that it is so smart and wears its intelligence lightly. Films about taste are not often made by Hollywood, perhaps because it would so severely limit the box office to require the audience to have any.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie's interest is not in the plot, which is episodic and "colorful," but in the performances.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Isn't a slick documentary; some of it feels like Blaustein's home movie about being a wrestling fan. But it has a hypnotic quality.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    I like the way Last Resort ends, how it concludes its emotional journey without pretending the underlying story is over. You walk out of the theater curiously touched.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Movies like Tumbleweeds exist in the details, not the outcome. Even a happy ending, we suspect, would be temporary. We don't mind, since the characters have been intriguing to know and easy to care about.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A surprisingly effective film.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    With Solomon & Gaenor, it is hard to overlook the folly of the characters. Does it count as a tragedy when the characters get more or less what they were asking for?
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The humor comes from the contrast between Elling's prim value system, obviously reflecting his mother's, and Kjell's shambling, disorganized, good-natured assault on life. If Felix and Oscar had been Norwegian, they might have looked something like this.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie is funny without being hilarious, touching but not tearful, and articulate in the way that Burns is articulate, by nibbling earnestly around an idea as if afraid that the core has seeds.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    In movies with this story structure, all depends on the precise timing of the delay and the revelation, and Bounce misses. Not by a lot, but by enough.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Good but not great Brooks... but smart, funny -- and edgy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    As much parable and fantasy as it is realistic.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    So likable, we go with it on its chosen level.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    If the movie is imperfect, it's not boring and is often very funny, as in a solo dance that Nick does in his apartment, to Frank Sinatra singing "I Won't Dance."
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Bright and zesty.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    I now believe in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. I was one of many who somehow absorbed the notion that it was an imaginary illness. I am ashamed of myself.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A delightful demonstration of how spirituality can coexist quite happily with an intense desire for France to defeat Brazil.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    We realize that the most frightening outcome of the movie would be if it contained no surprises, no revelations, no quirky twist at the end.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    If you have ever wondered what kind of person volunteers to become a human bomb, and what they think about in the days before their death, this film wonders, too.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Here is a rarity, a film about religion that is neither pious nor sensational, simply curious. No satanic possessions, no angelic choirs, no evil spirits, no lovers joined beyond the grave. Just a man doing his job.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Told as a melodrama and romance, not docudrama, and that makes it all the more effective.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie gets a little confused toward the end, I think, as its writer and director, Lea Pool, tries to settle things that could have been left unresolved.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    He (Walken) is a gifted classical actor...and here he understands Victor Kelly from the inside out.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Effortless in the way it insinuates itself into these families, touching in the way it shows how fiercely Romeo and Knocks are, despite everything, their own little men.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Cuts between a rich assortment of characters; it's like a low-rent, on-the-fly version of Robert Altman's "The Player" or "Short Cuts."
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    I did not really enjoy this movie, and yet I recommend it. Why? Because I think it's on to something interesting. Here is a movie about a woman who never stops thinking. That may not be as good for you as it is for her.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Doesn't reach for reality; it's a deliberate attempt to look and feel like a 1940s social problems picture, right down to the texture of the color photography.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is a movie of substance and thrilling historical sweep, and its three hours allow Szabo to show the family's destiny forming and shifting under pressure.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    As an inside view of the bursting of the Internet bubble, Startup.com is definitive.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Works because the story is sympathetic to the feelings of the characters, observes them as individuals, is not concerned with the sensational aspects of their household but in the gradual way practical matters work themselves out.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It has that unwound Roddy Doyle humor; the laughs don't hit you over the head, but tickle you behind the knee.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A valuable, heartbreaking film about the way those resources are plugged into a system, drained of their usefulness and discarded.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The point is to show us what can be done with recycled traditional animation in the IMAX 3-D process, and the demonstration is impressive.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A peculiarly entertaining comedy, revisits the rapport that Favreau and Vaughn had in "Swingers" (1996), and rotates it into a deadpan crime comedy.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is one of those comedies that doesn't pound us on the head with the obvious, but simply lets us share vast amusement.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    I would rather see one movie like this than a thousand "Bring It Ons."
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Brief, spare and heartbreaking.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The kind of movie that leaves you with fundamental objections. But that's after it's over. While it's playing, it's surprisingly good.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This whole movie is about manners. There is sex and violence, but the movie is not about giving in to them; it's about carrying on as if they didn't exist.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Rich and droll, and yet slight--a film of modest virtues, content to be small, achieving what it intends.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A story like Five Senses sounds like a gimmick, but Podeswa has a light touch when dealing with the senses and a sure one when telling his stories.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Movies like Wonderland invite me into the screen with them. I am curious. I begin to care.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This one basically just sticks to the real story, which has all the emotional wallop that's needed.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Forget the plot. The movie is really about Steve and Terri taking us on a guided tour of the crocs, snakes, deadly insects and other stars of the outback fauna. Steve's act is simplicity itself.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie's a mixed bag, but worth seeing for the good stuff, which is a lesson in how productive it can be to allow characters to say what they might actually say.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    I admired this movie. It kept me at arm's length, but that is where I am supposed to be; the characters are after all at arm's length from each other, and the tragedy of the story is implied but never spoken aloud.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie doesn't crank up the volume with violence and jailhouse cliches, but focuses on this person and his possibilities for change.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Has a freshness and charm, a winning way with its not terrifically original material.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Hovers intriguingly between homage and revenge.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A subtle but unmistakable aura of jolliness sneaks from the screen.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The Devil's Backbone has been compared to "The Others," and has the same ambition and intelligence, but is more compelling and even convincing.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A Martin Lawrence performance that deserves comparison with Richard Pryor and Eddie Murphy, with a touch of Mel Gibson's zaniness in the midst of action.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The agony of invention is there on the screen.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Will no doubt be a hit and inspire the obligatory sequels.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Exactly the kind of documentary we all want to have made about ourselves, in which it is revealed that we are funny, smart, beloved, the trusted confidant of famous people.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie is cast so well that the actors bring life to their predictable destinies, and Elizondo casts a kind of magical warm spell over them all.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    There are several Idiot Plot moments when a simple line of dialogue (''He has Tourette's syndrome'') would work wonders but is never said. And yet the movie has a sweetness and care that is touching.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    While most band documentaries wade through sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll, this one has no sex, no drugs, and the kind of rock 'n' roll that reminds one of their fans of "something I'd hear at a dorm party."
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    As a drama about the ravages of mental illness, the movie works; too bad most of the critics read it only as a romantic soap opera in which the hero is an obsessive sap. They read the signs but miss the diagnosis.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    In its quiet and murderous way, it is like the delayed final act of an old movie about drugs, guns and revenge.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It's better to know going in that you're not expected to be able to fit everything together, that you may lose track of some members of the large cast, that it's like attending a family reunion when it's not your family and your hosts are too drunk to introduce you around.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    After slogging through the predictability of countless would-be action thrillers, I admired the sheer professionalism of this one, which doesn't transcend its genre, but at least honors it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    I call the movie a thriller, even though the outcome is known, because it plays like one: We may know that the world doesn't end, but the players in this drama don't, and it is easy to identify with them.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It's that ambiguity that makes the film interesting.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A very angry film.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Although it has some contrived plot devices (including the looming deadline of the city's threat to the bathhouse), it is warm and observant, and its ending is surprisingly true to the material.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    His story is simple, unadorned, direct. Only the margins are complicated.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    If the story is immensely satisfying in a traditional way, the style has its own delights.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A direct, spare, touching film.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Chalk is not the kind of movie many people will appreciate at first viewing. You have to understand who Nilsson and his actors are, and give some thought to the style, to appreciate it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Gets better the more attention you pay. To say "nothing happens" is to be blind to everyday life, during which we wage titanic struggles with our programming.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It's a funny homage, a nod to the way that some movies are universal in their appeal.

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