For 4,340 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 74% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 24% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Howards End
Lowest review score: 0 Tomcats
Score distribution:
4340 movie reviews
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    There is a wise and understanding teacher on the faculty, played by Anjelica Huston. Defending the work of Dead White Males, she sensibly observes that when they did their best work "they weren't dead yet."
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    In too much of a hurry to be much of a people picture. And the standoff at the end edges perilously close to the ridiculous, for a movie that's tried so hard to be plausible.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It's unfair to complain that Weiss seems over the top. The portrayal seems to be accurate.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    One of the movie's most enjoyable in-jokes is the way some of the animals actually look a little like the humans doing their voices.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is the kind of movie you don't want to analyze until you've seen it two times. Now that I've seen it twice, I think I understand it, or maybe not. Certainly it's entertaining as it rolls along.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Body of Lies is a James Bond plot inserted into today's headlines. The film wants to be persuasive in its expertise about modern spycraft, terrorism, the CIA and Middle East politics. But its hero is a lone ranger who operates in three countries, single-handedly creates a fictitious terrorist organization, and survives explosions, gunfights, and brutal torture.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    If the movie is imperfect, it's not boring and is often very funny, as in a solo dance that Nick does in his apartment, to Frank Sinatra singing "I Won't Dance."
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    I call the movie a thriller, even though the outcome is known, because it plays like one: We may know that the world doesn't end, but the players in this drama don't, and it is easy to identify with them.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie works because it is, above all, sincere. It's not sports by the numbers. The starring performance by Kuno Becker is convincing and dimensional and we begin to care for him.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Real Steel is a real movie. It has characters, it matters who they are, it makes sense of its action, it has a compelling plot. This is the sort of movie, I suspect, young viewers went to the "Transformers" movies looking for.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    There's some kind of pulse of sincerity beating below the glittering surface, and it may come from Mitchell's own life story.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Maybe the environment is poisoned, and the group is phony, and Carol is gnawing away at her own psychic health. Now there's a fine mess.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is an amazingly ambitious movie, not so much because of the time and space it covers (a lot), but because Potter trusts us to follow her heroine through one damn thing after another.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    One of those movies you like more at the time than in retrospect.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The Rainmaker, unlike most Grisham films, doesn't have to drag a high-paid superstar around and give him all the best lines. DeVito's role is in the fading tradition of the star character actor.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The third act departs from Chekhov and is original with Miller; it not only makes a nicely ironic point, but, because he takes his time with it, allows for a meditation on the distance between art and life.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Dolls isn't a film for everybody, especially the impatient, but Kitano does succeed, I think, in drawing us into his tempo and his world, and slowing us down into the sadness of his characters.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Bully is a sincere documentary but not a great one. We feel sympathy for the victims, and their parents or friends, but the film helplessly seems to treat bullying as a problem without a solution.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    In fact the sequel is a better film than the original, as if writer-producer Luc Besson had a clearer idea of what he wanted to do (and didn't want to do).
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A story like Five Senses sounds like a gimmick, but Podeswa has a light touch when dealing with the senses and a sure one when telling his stories.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    By casting attractive stars in the leads, by finding the right visual look, by underlining the action with brooding, ominously sad music, a good director can create the illusion of meaning even when nothing's there.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    What lends Rapt its fascination is that it represents such a dramatic fall from grace for its hero.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Audacious, technically masterful, challenging, sometimes moving, ceaselessly watchable. What holds it back from greatness is a failure to really engage the ideas that it introduces.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    If Cameron wants to be a pioneer instead of a retro hobbyist, he should obviously use Maxivision 48, which provides a picture of such startling clarity that it appears to be 3-D in the sense that the screen seems to open a transparent window on reality. Ghosts of the Abyss would have been incomparably more powerful in the process.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Now why did I like this movie? It was just plain dumb fun, is why. It is absurd and preposterous, and proud of it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The actors are attractive, the city is magnificent, the love scenes don't get all sweaty, and everybody finishes the summer a little wiser and with a lifetime of memories. What more could you ask?
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It is a good story, a natural, and it grabs us. But just as there is almost no way to screw it up, so there's hardly any way to bring it above a certain level of inspiration.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is the kind of movie where you laugh occasionally and have a silly grin most of the rest of the time.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie overcomes its lack or originality in the setup by making good use of its central idea, that a pair of sneakers could make a kid into an NBA star. This is a message a lot of kids have been waiting to hear.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The situations are more or less standard (fights over sleeping arrangements, emergencies that have to be solved, moments of truth and confession), but the dialogue and the acting bring the material up to another level.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    I liked a lot of it myself, and with me, a few broadswords and leather jerkins go a long way.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The film is told almost entirely without dialogue, but is alive to sound; we spend observant, introspective hours in a Hungarian hamlet where nothing much seems to happen -- oh, except that there's a suspicious death.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Stillman writes his own dialogue, and is a master of clever double-reverse wit.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    We think of first love as sweet and valuable, a blessed if hazardous condition. This film, deeper than it seems, dares to suggest that beyond a certain point, it can represent a tragedy.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    There are some one-liners that zing not only with humor but truth. On the whole I was satisfied.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A good movie, fearless and true, observant and merciless. Naomi Watts was brave to make it and gifted to make it so well.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie surprised me. It treats its disabled characters with affection and respect, it has a plot that uses the Special Olympics instead of misusing them, and it's actually kind of sweet.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Like Crazy is a well-made film. The scenes showing Jacob and Anna falling in love have a freshness, and I learn Doremus handed his actors an outline and together they improvised every scene. Some of the whispered endearments under the sheets are delightful.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It looks fabulous, it uses special effects to create a new world of its own, but it is thin in its human story.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Any laughs that it inspires will be very hollow. It's more of a celebration of madness and doom, with a hero who tries to prevail against the chaos of his condition, and is inadequate.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    My only complaint is that its plot flatlines compared to the 1979 version, which was trickier, wittier and smarter. Romero was not above finding parallels between zombies and mall shoppers.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The problem is that the film is at such pains to make its points that it doesn't trust us to find our own connections.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    An entertaining family movie, and may serve a useful purpose if it inspires kids to overthrow their coaches and take over their own sports.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie lacks the wit and self-mocking irony of the Indiana Jones movies, and instead seems like a throwback to the simple-minded, clean-cut sensibility of a less complicated time. That doesn’t mean The Rocketeer is not entertaining. But adjustments are necessary to enjoy it.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Some of the political undertones may go astray, but the emotional center of the film is touching and honest.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The performance by Ross invests Jessie with a kind of zealous hope that is touching: Here is a slutty loser touched by the divine, and transformed.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is not a perfect movie; it's so ragged, it's practically constructed of loose ends. But it's exciting because it ventures so far off the map.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Selling anyone the right to touch your genital area for a couple of bucks is not a good way to build self-esteem. Steven Soderbergh's Magic Mike makes this argument with a crafty mixture of comedy, romance, melodrama and some remarkably well-staged strip routines involving hunky, good-looking guys.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The Devil's Backbone has been compared to "The Others," and has the same ambition and intelligence, but is more compelling and even convincing.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    I've only been to Denmark twice and have no idea if this is even remotely a Danish situation, but it could fit right fine in the Old West.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    As entertainment, the movie functions successfully. But I don't believe the story is true--not true to the facts, and not true to the morality it pretends to be about.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Only movie lovers who have marinated their imaginations in the great B movies from RKO and Republic will recognize The Hot Spot as a superior work in an old tradition - as a manipulation of story elements as mannered and deliberate, in its way, as variations on a theme for the piano.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Once in a blue moon a movie escapes the shackles of its genre and does what it really wants to do. Kids in America is a movie like that. It breaks out of Hollywood jail.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Sharky’s Machine contains all of the ingredients of a tough, violent, cynical big-city cop movie, but what makes it intriguing is the way the Burt Reynolds character plays against those conventions.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Fascinating to watch as a portrait of political celebrity and ego.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Is it funny? Yes, it is.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The whole film has a lively Mexican-American tilt, from the Hispanic backgrounds of the young actors to the surprise appearance of none other than Ricardo Montalban, as Grandpa, in a wheelchair with helicopter capabilities.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Delicacy is a sweetheart of a love story, and cornball from stem to stern.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A well-made use of familiar materials.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    To Rome With Love isn't great Woody Allen. Here is a man who has made a feature every year since 1969, give or take a few, and if they cannot all be great Woody, it's churlish to complain if they're only good Woody.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Lin takes an established franchise and makes it surprisingly fresh and intriguing. The movie is not exactly "Shogun" when it comes to the subject of an American in Japan (nor, on the other hand, is it "Lost in Translation"). But it's more observant than we expect, and uses its Japanese locations to make the story about something more than fast cars.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Together [Christopher Eccleston, Rachel Griffiths and Kate Winslet] stake a difficult story and make it into a haunting film.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Rock conveys a lot of information, but also some unfortunate opinions and misleading facts. That doesn't mean the move isn't warm, funny, and entertaining.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Here there is a dry wit, generated between the well-balanced performances of Fiennes and Blanchett, who seem quietly delighted to be playing two such rich characters.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The film's implication, quite starkly, is that a strong military doesn't favor crybabies, that a certain degree of rape is unavoidable - and inevitably, that some women may have been asking for it. One hearing noted that the victim was dressed provocatively. In her official uniform.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Swimming is above all about a young woman's face, and by casting an actress whose face projects that woman's doubts and yearnings, it succeeds. The face belongs to Lauren Ambrose.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Enormously entertaining.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The animation is nicely stylized and the color palette well-chosen, although the humans are so square-jawed, they make Dick Tracy look like Andy Gump. The voice performances are persuasive. The obvious drawback is that the film is in 3-D. If you can find a theater showing it in 2-D, seek it out.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    I don't much care if the battles aren't that amazing, because the story doesn't depend on them. It's about a sacrifice made by Spock, and it draws on the sentiment and audience identification developed over the years by the TV series.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie's strength is in the acting, with Gosling once again playing a character with an insistent presence.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie's dialogue is smart. It doesn't just chug along making plot points.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Great World of Sound, a Sundance hit, is Zobel’s first film, a confident, sure-handed exercise focusing on the American Dream, turned nightmare.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie is an engrossing melodrama, and it has its heart in the right place.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    When Marley is not on the screen, Wilson and Aniston demonstrate why they are gifted comic actors. They have a relationship that's not too sitcomish, not too sentimental, mostly smart and realistic.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The Muppets Take Manhattan is yet another retread of the reliable old formula in which somebody says "Hey, gang! Our senior class musical show is so good, I'll bet we could be stars on Broadway!" The fact that this plot is not original does not deter you, Kermit, nor should it. It's still a good plot.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    In Good Company is a rare species: a feel-good movie about big business. It's about a corporate culture that tries to be evil and fails.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It could have been more, could have been a triumph and a classic, instead of simply an effective entertainment.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is not a deep movie, but it's a broad one. It reunites three talents who had an enormous hit with "Y Tu Mama Tambien": actors Gael Garcia Bernal and Diego Luna, and Carlos Cuaron, who wrote that film and writes and directs this one. Instead of trying to top themselves with life and poignancy, they wisely do something for fun.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The most outspoken and yet in some ways the calmest of the new documentaries opposing the Bush presidency.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A movie like this can get you thinking.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Kicking and Screaming doesn't have much of a plot, but of course it wouldn't; this is a movie about characters waiting for their plots to begin.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    An ingenious attempt to update an old plot with new technology, and it is made with competence, skillful acting, and the ability to make us feel cleverer about digital stuff than we really are.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A joyous movie.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It's not art, it's not “Juno,” it's not “Girlfight,” for that matter, but as a movie about a flesh-eating cheerleader, it's better than it has to be.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is a great deal more entertaining than it sounds, in large part because the two actors are gifted mimics - Brydon the better one, although Coogan doesn't think so.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A tender and passionate protest, not without laughter, by Bertrand Tavernier -- a director who is not only gifted but honorable.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    There's so much good here, in the dialogue, the performances and the observation, that the movie succeeds at many moments even while pursuing its doomed grand design.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Though I usually take pleasure in Almodovar's sexy darkness, this film induces queasiness.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is a gloomy film with weird characters doing nasty things. I've heard of eating chocolate-covered insects, but not when they're alive.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Baby Boom makes no effort to show us real life. It is a fantasy about mothers and babies and sweetness and love, with just enough wicked comedy to give it an edge.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The 1975 movie tilted toward horror instead of comedy. Now here's a version that tilts the other way, and I like it a little better.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It's warm, entertaining, funny, and centered around that great Sissy Spacek performance, but it's essentially pretty familiar material (not that Loretta Lynn can be blamed that Horatio Alger wrote her life before she lived it). The movie isn't great art, but it has been made with great taste and style; it's more intelligent and observant than movie biographies of singing stars used to be. That makes it a treasure to watch, even if we sometimes have the feeling we've seen it before.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is not a "horror" film or an "underground" film, but an act of transgression so extreme and uncompromised, and yet so amateurish and sloppy, that it exists in a category of one film -- this film.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Little Voice is unthinkable without the special and unexpected talent of its star.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    For me, Richard Jenkins is the heart of Norman. How often I've admired him; even in unworthy roles, he has such strength, he never seems the need to try.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Jackson disappears into his role, completely convincing, but then he usually is. What a fine actor. He avoids pitfalls like making Champ a maudlin tearjerker, looking for pity. He's realistic, even philosophical, about his life and what happened to him.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Now is Slipstream worth seeing? I think so, if you'll actively engage your sympathy with Hopkins' attempt to do something tricky and difficult. If you want to lie back and let the movie come to you, you may be lying there a long time.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This isn't a great movie. But it's sincere as an entertainment, it looks good, it's atmospheric, and I will perk up the next time I hear Gianna is in a picture.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The film looks great, the songs are wonderfully visualized, and the characters are appealing.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is one of those comedies that doesn't pound us on the head with the obvious, but simply lets us share vast amusement.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Impressive moviemaking, showing Scorsese as a master of a traditional Hollywood genre.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It's pretty good, in fact, with full-blooded performances and heartfelt melodrama.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Intense, erotic and willful.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    May be a sardonic view of Japanese corporate culture, but that's not all it is. The movie is also subtly sexual and erotic, despite the fact that every scene takes place in the office and there is not a single overt sexual act or word or gesture or reference.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Masterful at concealing its true nature and surprising us with the turns of the story.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Despite its creativity, the movie remains space opera and avoids the higher realms of science-fiction.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The result is one of the jollier comedies of the year, a movie so mainstream that you can almost watch it backing away from confrontation, a film aimed primarily at a middle-American heterosexual audience.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Not a documentary about anything in particular. That is its charm. It's a meandering visit by a curious man with a quiet sense of humor, who pokes here and there in his family history, and the history of tobacco.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Ephron develops this story with all of the heartfelt sincerity of a 1950s tearjerker (indeed, the movie's characters spend a lot of time watching "An Affair to Remember" and using it as their romantic compass).
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    As loaded with special effects as "The Matrix,'' but they're on a different scale. Many of his best effects are gooey, indescribable organic things, and some of the most memorable scenes involve characters eating things that surgeons handle with gloves on.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Coppola is unable to draw all this together and make it work on the level of simple, absorbing narrative. The stunning text of "The Godfather" is replaced in Part II with prologues, epilogues, footnotes, and good intentions.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Ang Lee has boldly taken the broad outlines of a comic book story and transformed them to his own purposes; this is a comic book movie for people who wouldn't be caught dead at a comic book movie.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    I feel such an affection for Chabrol and his work that I probably can't see The Flower of Evil as it would be experienced by a first-time viewer. Would that newcomer note the elegance, the confidence, the sheer joy in the way he treasures the banalities of bourgeois life on his way to the bloodshed?
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This movie has a lot of good music in it, some on the soundtrack, some on the screen. Jackson and Bernie Mac have enormous fun doing intricate dance moves together.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Four Lions is impossible to categorize. It's an exceedingly dark comedy, a wicked satire, a thriller where the thrills center on the incompetence of the villains.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This movie kept me involved and intrigued, and for that I'm grateful. I'm beginning to wonder whether, in some situations, absurdity might not be a strength.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The two leading men, Northam and Everett, are smooth and charming.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    I found myself resisting the film's pull of easy emotion. There are fundamental questions here, and the film doesn't engage them. I believe Christian should have had the humility to lead his monks away from the path of self-sacrifice.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is the second movie Judd and Freeman have made together (after "Kiss the Girls" in 1997). They're both good at projecting a kind of Southern intelligence that knows its way around the frailties of human nature.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The point is to show us what can be done with recycled traditional animation in the IMAX 3-D process, and the demonstration is impressive.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A crisp, smart, cynical film about dishonor among thieves.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    These stories have as their justification that fact that they are intrinsically interesting. I think that's enough.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is the documentary that caused a sensation at Sundance 2004 and allegedly inspired McDonald's to discontinue its "super size" promotions as a preemptive measure.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Inside Deep Throat, a documentary that premiered at Sundance and is now going into national release, was made not on the fringes but by the very establishment itself.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A funny movie that only gets funnier the more familiar you are with the James Bond movies, all the Bond clones and countless other 1960s films.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A Martin Lawrence performance that deserves comparison with Richard Pryor and Eddie Murphy, with a touch of Mel Gibson's zaniness in the midst of action.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It contains one element of startling originality: its bad guy, nicknamed Pooh-Bear and played by Vincent D'Onofrio in a great weird demented giggle of a performance; imagine a Batman villain cycled through the hallucinations of "Requiem for a Dream."
    • Chicago Sun-Times
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The film is built around two relationships, both touching, both emotionally true.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Low-key, understated style. The suspense beats away underneath.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Adult audiences may be underwhelmed. Not younger teenage girls, who will be completely fascinated.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Begins and ends with facts of war, but it is really a film about the nature of male and female, about middle-class values and those who cannot afford them, about how helpless we can be when the net of society is broken.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The Sound of My Voice never precisely declares whether her story is true. Without going into detail, I can say that the film never precisely declares anything to be true.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    As an inside view of the bursting of the Internet bubble, Startup.com is definitive.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Wesley Snipes understands the material from the inside out and makes an effective Blade because he knows that the key ingredient in any interesting superhero is not omnipotence, but vulnerability.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Luke Ford's performance as Charlie is a convincing tour de force. You may recall him as Brendan Fraser's heroic son in "The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor." Rhys Wakefield, in his first feature role, is a good casting decision, suggesting inner turmoil without overacting.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Some women are simply sexy forever. Helen Mirren is a woman like that. She's 64. As she enters her 70s, we'll begin to develop a fondness for sexy septuagenarians.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Jacques Perrin's Oscar-nominated Winged Migration does for birds what the 1996 documentary "Microcosmos" did for insects: It looks at them intimately, very close up, in shots that seem impossible to explain.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    I laughed often enough during the screening of Harold & Kumar that afterward I told Dann Gire, distinguished president of the Chicago Film Critics' Assn., that I thought maybe I should rent "Dude, Where's My Car?" and check it out.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A well-made movie. I cared about the characters. I felt for them. Liberate them from the plot's destiny, which is an anvil around their necks, and you might have something.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The mechanics of the final showdown are unexpected and yet show an undeniable logic, and are sold by the acting skills of Willis and Pollak.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A silly, high-spirited chase picture that takes us, as they say, from the canyons of Manhattan to the steaming jungles of South America. After all the Raiders rip-offs, it's fun to find an adventure film that deserves the comparison, that has the same spirit and sense of humor.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Bright and zesty.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Not at the level of "Finding Nemo" or "Shrek," but is a lot of fun, awfully nice to look at, and filled with energy and smiles.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    After months and months of comedies that did not make me laugh, here at last is one that did.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Film by film, Ang Lee, from Taipei out of the University of Illinois, has become one of the world's leading directors. This film was his second Golden Lion winner in three years at the Venice Film Festival. But it is not among his best films. It lacks the focus and fire that his characters finally find. Less sense, more sensibility.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    In trash as in art there is no accounting for taste, and reader, I cherished this movie in all of its lurid glory.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    What we sense in the film is the camaraderie among these hopeful dancers. They've all been through the process before, all been disappointed before, all know better than anyone else what it takes, all believe the best candidates don't always win the jobs.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Well written. The dialogue is smart and fresh.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Here, as the little cinder girl, she is able to at last put aside her bedraggled losers and flower as a fresh young beauty, and she brings poignancy and fire to the role.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It needs a study guide, and viewing "Citizen Kane" might be a good place to start.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The film, written and directed by Michael S. Ojeda, shows a sure sense of noir style and a toughness that lasts right up to the very final scene, which feels contrived and tacked-on.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The Five Obstructions clearly calls for a sequel, in which Leth would require von Trier to remake "Dogville," despite Obstructions 6 through 10.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Diane Kruger, whose Lisa is subjected to logical whiplash by the plot, always seems to know when it is and how she should feel. Now that's acting.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    If you have ever wondered what kind of person volunteers to become a human bomb, and what they think about in the days before their death, this film wonders, too.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie is not intended to be subtle. It is sweaty, candle-lit melodrama, joyously trashy, and its photography wallows in sumptuous decadence.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    True Romance, which feels at times like a fire sale down at the cliche factory, is made with such energy, such high spirits, such an enchanting goofiness, that it's impossible to resist. Check your brains at the door.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    As the final hour approaches for the characters in Last Night, there are moments of startling poignancy.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The real surprise of the movie is Eddie Murphy, who finds his character and stays with him.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Lighthearted fun.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A cheerfully energetically and very vulgar comedy.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The formula is obvious: Die Hard Goes to Sea. I walked into the screening in a cynical frame of mind, but then a funny thing happened. The movie started working for me.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Payami has a visual style that is sometimes astonishing, sometimes frustrating, sometimes both.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    In its quiet and murderous way, it is like the delayed final act of an old movie about drugs, guns and revenge.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is a fresh and cheerful movie with a goofy sense of humor and a good ear for how teenagers talk.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Catch That Kid respects all of the requirements of the genre, and the heist itself is worthy of "Ocean's Eleven" (either one; take your pick).
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The director, Peter Cattaneo, takes material that could would be at home in a sex comedy, and gives it gravity because of the desperation of the characters; we glimpse the home life of these men, who have literally been put on the shelf, and we see the wound to their pride.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is a good film, but it would not cheer people up much at a high school reunion.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It's a film filled with wicked satire and sex both joyful and pitiful.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The important thing about "The Importance" is that all depends on the style of the actors, and Oliver Parker's film is well cast.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The Crazy Horse Saloon in Paris is famous for its "erotic chic" revues, but I found nothing either erotic or chic in this reduction of body parts to geometrical displays.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is not a perfect movie; it meanders and ambles and makes puzzling detours. But it's smart and unconventional, with a good eye for the perfect This is not a perfect movie; it meanders and ambles and makes puzzling detours. But it's smart and unconventional, with a good eye for the perfect detail.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Clever in the way it avoids most of the cliches of the vampire movie by using cannibalism, and most of the cliches of the cannibal movie by using vampirism. It serves both dishes with new sauces.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    They talk warmly and with enthusiasm about certain titles, but I have the eerie feeling that they must be at a movie whether they enjoy it or not.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The bottom line is, all these people chase the same money around with the success of doggie tail-biting, and it's a lot of fun, and it's not often in these con films that everybody is conning everybody, and they're all scared to death, and nobody knows which cup the pea is under.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The film's buried message is that there is a reservoir of admiration and affection for America, at least among the educated classes in the Arab world, and they do not equate the current administration with America.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Here is a strong and simple story surrounded by needless complications, and flawed by a last act that first disappoints us and then ends on a note of forced whimsy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    So extreme is his mad dog behavior, indeed, that it shades over into humor: Washington seems to enjoy a performance that's over the top and down the other side.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A documentary that is beyond strange, follows two arch-enemies in their grim, long-term rivalry, which involves way more time than any human lifetime should devote to Donkey Kong.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Bright, lively and entertaining, but it's no "Shrek." Maybe it's too much to expect lightning to strike twice.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is a jolly, slapstick comedy, lacking the almost eerie humanity that infused the earlier “Toy Story” sagas, and happier with action and jokes than with characters and emotions.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Where it succeeds is as the story of a chapter in history, the story of how one coach at one school arrived at an obvious conclusion and acted on it, and helped open college sports in the South to generations of African Americans.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Garfield: A Tail of Two Kitties is actually funnier and more charming than the first film.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    What I did appreciate is that City of Angels is one of the few angel movies that knows one essential fact about angels: They are not former people. ”Angels aren't human. We were never human,” observes Seth. This is quite true. Angels are purely spiritual beings.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Cadillac Records is an account of the Chess story that depends more on music than history, which is perhaps as it should be. The film is a fascinating record of the evolution of a black musical style, and the tangled motives of the white men who had an instinct for it.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It's a reminder of the days before films got so cynical and unrelentingly violent. A Knight's Tale is whimsical, silly and romantic.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    What's funny in cartoons is not always funny in live action, and some of the dunkings in unsavory substances left me less than amused.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Do these films reflect actual aspects of modern Tokyo? The hikikomori epidemic is apparently real enough, but the other two segments seem more deliberately fantastical. The entertainment value? Medium to high: "Merde." Tokyo? Still standing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    If the movie were not so downbeat and its literary pedigree so distinguished, the resolution would be soap opera.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Although there are some scary moments here, and a lot of gruesome ones, this isn't a horror film so much as a faux eco-documentary.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A pure thriller, all blood, no frills, in which a lot of people get shot, mostly in the head.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This movie could obviously go on fooling us forever, but we are good sports only up to a point, and then our attention drifts. Shame, since there's so much good stuff in it, like how effortlessly Rachel Griffiths keeps two tough guys completely at her mercy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    My Cousin Vinny is a movie that meanders along going nowhere in particular, and then lightning strikes. I didn't get much involved in it, and yet individual moments and some of the performances were very funny. It's the kind of movie home video was invented for: Not worth the trip to the theater, but slam it into the VCR and you get your rental's worth.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There are scenes that don't even pretend to work. And others that have a sweetness and visual beauty that stops time and simply invites you to share.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie isn't laugh out loud funny, under the circumstances, but it is bittersweet and wistfully amusing; the actors enjoy lachrymosity. We witness the birth of a new genre, the Post-Slasher Movie.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Somehow the movie fails to connect with the amazing energy of Hawking's ideas. We're left wanting to know more about either his theories or his life, but what we get is a little of each.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It is not a serious film about its subject, nor is it quite a dark comedy, despite some of Pacino's good lines. The epilogue, indeed, cheats in a way I thought had been left behind in grade school. And yet there are splendid moments.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Since it is by Wong Kar Wai, 2046 is visually stunning. He uses three cinematographers but one style, that tries to evoke mood more than meaning. The movie as a whole, unfortunately, never seems sure of itself. It's like a sketchbook. These are images, tones, dialogue and characters that Wong is sure of, and he practices them, but he does not seem very sure why he is making the movie, or where it should end.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie has been produced by Nickelodeon, and will no doubt satisfy its intended audience enormously. It does not cross over into the post-Nickelodeon universe.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    You can enjoy the way they create little flashes of wit in the dialogue, which enlivens what is, after all, a formula disaster movie.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The architecture of The Debt has an unfortunate flaw. The younger versions of the characters have scenes that are intrinsically more exciting, but the actors playing the older versions are more interesting. Helen Mirren, Tom Wilkinson and Ciaran Hinds bring along the weight of their many earlier roles. To be sure, the older actors get some excitement of their own, but by then, the plot has lost its way.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    We have the feeling that Kemp/Thompson saw much of life through the bottom of a dirty glass and did not experience it with any precision. The film duplicates this sensation, not with much success.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Baratz doesn't ask any of the obvious questions, preferring to observe uncritically, and if you can do the same, you may find Unmistaken Child worth seeing. I could not, and grew restless.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The performances are often good, including Reno's; he has an interesting, poker-faced way of underplaying scenes that keeps him from being a stereotyped kid.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie seemed the stuff of anecdote, not drama, and as the alleged protagonist, Luca/Franco is too young much of the time to play more than a bystander's role.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I can't really recommend the film, unless you admire Caine as much as I do, which is certainly possible.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Sandler, at the center, is a distraction; he steals scenes, and we want him to give them back.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This is a great-looking movie, a triumph of set design and special effects, creating a fantasy world halfway between suburbia and a prehistoric cartoon.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The film doesn't make us work, doesn't allow us to figure out things for ourselves, is afraid we'll miss things if they're not spelled out.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's the kind of movie that provides diversion for the idle channel-surfer but isn't worth a trip to the theater. A lot of it seems cobbled together out of spare parts.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A documentary that does the job it sets out to do. I wish it had tried for more. It is a competent TV sports doc, the sort you'd expect to see on ESPN. Unless you are a big fan of Senna or Formula One, I don't know why you'd want to pay first-run prices to see it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Fatal Attraction is a spellbinding psychological thriller that could have been a great movie if the filmmakers had not thrown character and plausibility to the winds in the last minutes to give us their version of a grown-up "Friday the 13th."
    • 32 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie presents the surfaces of Obermaier's life but never lets us understand who she was.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Begins rather awkwardly, but ends by making a statement that explains a great many things. One question left unasked: Why did we promise to defend Taiwan with nuclear weapons but refuse to recognize it as a sovereign nation?
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Is this a good movie? Not exactly; too much of it is on automatic pilot, as it must be, to satisfy the fans of the original Shaft. Is it better than I expected? Yes.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Burton's made a film that's respectful to the original, and respectable in itself, but that's not enough. Ten years from now, it will be the 1968 version that people are still renting.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's one of those movies where you smile and laugh and are reasonably entertained, but you get no sense of a mighty enterprise sweeping you along with its comedic force. There is not a movie here. Just scenes in search of one.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I liked it in the same way I might like an arcade game: It holds your attention until you run out of quarters, and then you wander away without giving it another thought.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I found the idea of the plot more interesting than the plot itself, and am finding the movie more fun to write about than to see.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The Aristocrats might have made a nice short subject. At 87 minutes, it's like the boozy salesman who corners you with the Pinocchio torture.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    We go expecting to be inspired and uplifted, and we leave somewhat satisfied in those areas, but with reluctant questions about how well the story has aged, and how relevant it is today.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Variable ratings: The Hand (4 stars), Equilibrium (3 stars), The Dangerous Thread of Things (1 star).
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Doesn't quite click.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I can't recommend Mission to Mars.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A moody, effective thriller for about 80 percent of the way, and then our hands close on air. If you walk out before the ending, you'll think it's better than it is.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There is clear definition between closer and further elements. I've seen a lot of 3-D recently, and in terms of technical quality, this is the best.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Kevin Spacey brings another of his cynical, bitter characters to life -- very smart, and fresh out of hope -- but the movie doesn't give him much of anywhere to take it.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    When a film telling three stories and spanning thousands of years has a running time of 96 minutes, scenes must have been cut out. There will someday be a Director’s Cut of this movie, and that’s the cut I want to see.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Whatever happened to the delight and, if you'll excuse the term, the magic in the "Harry Potter" series? As the characters grow up, the stories grow, too, leaving the innocence behind and confusing us with plots so labyrinthine that it takes a Ph.D from Hogwarts to figure them out.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The first three minutes convince us we're are looking at a commercial before the feature begins. Then we realize the whole movie will look like this.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie exhibits the usual indifference to the issues involved. Although it was written and directed by Elie Chouraqui, a Frenchman, it is comfortably xenophobic. Most Americans have never understood the differences among Croats, Serbs and Bosnians, and this film is no help.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There's so much flashing forward and backward, so many spins of fate, so many chapters in the journals, that after awhile I felt that I, as well as time, was being jerked around.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A perfectly competent genre film in a genre that has exhausted its interest for me, the Zombie Film.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The first movie combining Ping-Pong and kung-fu and co-starring Maggie Q. How many could there be?
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie has been cast, designed, clothed, scored and edited to the bleeding edge of hip, but it hasn't exactly been written.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Take away the drugs, and this is the story of a boring life in wholesale.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I can see what Thomson is getting at and even sort of appreciate it at times; the movie isn't boring, but it meanders and loses track of plot threads. Any feelings we have for the characters is muted because they all richly deserve to die at one another's hands.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Father of the Bride Part II is not a great movie and not even as good as its 1991 inspiration. But it is warm and fuzzy, and has some good laughs and a lot of sweetness.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    How Stella Got Her Groove Back tries its best to turn a paperback romance into a relationship worth making a movie about, but fails.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There is an irony here. The film exhibits an admirable determination to do justice to a real story, but the story's not real.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Not a successful thriller, but with some nice dramatic scenes along with the dumb mystery and contrived conclusion.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Maintains a certain level of intrigue, and occasionally bursts into life.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Flashes of inspiration illuminate stretches of routine sitcom material; it's the kind of movie where the audience laughs loudly and then falls silent for the next five minutes.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    When a movie begins to present one implausible or unwise decision after another, when its world plays too easily into the hands of its story, when the taste for symbolism creates impossible scenes, we grow restless.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A pleasant, inoffensive 3-D animated farce about a team of superspy gophers.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    What is good about this film is very good, but there are too many side trips, in both the plot and the emotions, for the film to draw us in fully.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Sometimes in an imperfect movie there is consolation simply in regarding the actors.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The fancy stuff and foolery impedes the story and its emotions; the underlying story was strong enough that maybe a traditional narrative would have been best, after all.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I like Miley Cyrus. I like her in spite of the fact that she's been packaged within an inch of her life. I look forward to the day when she squirms loose from her handlers and records an album of classic songs, performed with the same sincerity as her godmother, Dolly Parton. I think it'll be a long, long time until she plays a movie character like the free-standing, engaging heroines of Ashley Judd, but I can wait.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Annette Bening plays Julia in a performance that has great verve and energy, and just as well, because the basic material is wheezy melodrama.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It is not a bad movie, mind you; it's clever and shows great control of craft, but it doesn't care, and so it's hard for us to care about. To see it once is to plumb to the bottom of its mysteries, and beyond.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There will be better movies playing in the same theater, even if it is a duplex, but on the other hand there is something to be said for goofiness without apology by broken lizards who just wanna have fun.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Look at the performances. They're surprisingly good, and I especially admired the work of Monica Potter and Tony Goldwyn as the parents of one of two girls who go walking in the woods.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The director is Edward Zwick, a considerable filmmaker. He obtains a warm, lovable performance from Anne Hathaway and dimensions from Gyllenhaal that grow from comedy to the serious.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Fabulously well-acted and crafted, but when I reach for it, my hand closes on air. It has rich material and isn't clear what it thinks about it. It has two performances of Oscar caliber, but do they connect?
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    An uneven but touching comedy with a cheery score that sounds too much like whistling on the way past the graveyard.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Has a good heart and some fine performances, but is too muddled at the story level to involve us emotionally.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The edge is missing from Guest's usual style. Maybe it's because his targets are, after all, so harmless.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Does it by the numbers, so efficiently this feels more like a Hollywood wannabe than a French film. Where's the quirkiness, the nuance, the deeper levels?
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It has all the necessary girls, gimmicks, subterranean control rooms, uniformed goons and magic wristwatches it can hold, but it doesn't have the wit and it doesn't have the style of the best Bond movies.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Has moments of great imagination.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Elles has a surprisingly deep performance in a disappointingly shallow movie. The performance, acute and brave, is by Juliette Binoche.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The setup in The Client is done so well, it deserves a better payoff.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Theater of the absurd, masquerading as an action thriller.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The Omen takes all of this terribly seriously, as befits the genre that gave us Rosemary’s Baby and The Exorcist. What Jesus was to the 1950s movie epic, the devil is to the 1970s, and so all of this material is approached with the greatest solemnity, not only in the performances but also in the photography, the music and the very looks on people's faces.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The footage on the Paris Island obstacle course is powerful. But Full Metal Jacket is uncertain where to go, and the movie's climax, which Kubrick obviously intends to be a mighty moral revelation, seems phoned in from earlier war pictures.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I suspect its audience, which takes these films very seriously indeed, will drink deeply of its blood. The sensational closing sequence cannot be accused of leaving a single loophole, not even some those we didn't know were there.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This is a sumptuous film - extravagantly staged and photographed, perhaps too much so for its own good. There are times when it is not quite clear if we are looking at characters in a story or players on a stage. Productions can sometimes upstage a story, but when the story is as considerable as Anna Karenina, that can be a miscalculation.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Within Clay Pigeons is a smaller story that might have involved us more, but it's buried by overkill.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie operates at the level of a literate sitcom, in which the dialogue is smart and the characters are original, but the outcome and most of the stops along the way are preordained.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Wan's movie is very efficient. Bacon, skilled pro that he is, provides the character the movie needs, just as he has in such radically different films as "Where the Truth Lies," "The Woodsman" and "Mystic River."
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Meg Ryan does such an effective job of evoking her sexually hungry lonely girl that it might have been better to just follow that line and not distract her and the audience with the distraction of a crime plot.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Madagascar is funny, especially at the beginning, and good-looking in a retro cartoon way, but in a world where the stakes have been raised by "Finding Nemo," "Shrek" and "The Incredibles," it's a throwback to a more conventional kind of animated entertainment. It'll be fun for the smaller kids, but there's not much crossover appeal for their parents.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie is so filled with action that dramatic conflict would be more than we could handle, so all of the characters are nice.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The curious case of two appealing performances surviving a bombardment of schlock.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Too much action brings the movie to a dead standstill. Why don't directors understand that? Why don't they know that wall-to-wall action makes a movie less interesting -- less like drama, more like a repetitive video game?
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I liked the movie without loving it. It's not great Woody Allen, like "Sweet and Lowdown" or "Bullets Over Broadway," but it's smart and sly, and the blindness is an audacious idea.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The story, having failed to provide itself with character conflicts that can be resolved with drama, turns to melodrama instead.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I could see how, with a rewrite and a better focus, this could have been a film of "Braveheart'' quality instead of basically just a costume swashbuckler.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Adam wraps up their story in too tidy a package, insisting on finding the upbeat in the murky, and missing the chance to be more thoughtful about this challenging situation.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There are two strong stories here, in Africa and Denmark. Either could have made a film. Intercut in this way, they seem too much like self-conscious parables.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The interlocking stories are theoretically about people whose lives are associated; that worked in "Crash." Here the connections seem less immediate and significant, and so the movie sometimes seems based on a group of separate short stories.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Never quite lifts off. The elements are here, but not the magic.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Empire of the Sun adds up to a promising idea, a carefully observed production and some interesting performances.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie is quick and cheerful, and Spurlock is engaging.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Good fun, especially if you like Leone's way of savoring the last morsel of every scene. (Review of Original Release)
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Derailed has a great setup, a good middle passage and some convincing performances. Then it runs off the tracks.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Not a conventional documentary about quantum physics. It's more like a collision in the editing room between talking heads, an impenetrable human parable and a hallucinogenic animated cartoon.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A cheerful comedy with just enough dark moments to create the illusion it's really about something.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    You want loud, dumb, skillful, escapist entertainment? Twister works. You want to think? Think twice about seeing it.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Caddyshack never finds a consistent comic note of its own, but it plays host to all sorts of approaches from its stars, who sometimes hardly seem to be occupying the same movie.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie is never quite bold enough to point out the contradiction of Muslims and Christians hating one another, even though they both in theory worship the same god.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Slight and sweet, not a great high school movie but kinda nice, with appealing performances by Hart and Grenier.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Coppola's teenagers seem trapped inside too many layers of storytelling.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The Coens' Ladykillers, on the other hand, is always wildly signaling for us to notice it. Not content to be funny, it wants to be FUNNY! Have you ever noticed that the more a comedian wears funny hats, the less funny he is?
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    They (the characters) approach the subjects of sex and romance with a naivete so staggering, it must be an embarrassment in the greater world. Inside their hermetically sealed complacency, I suppose it's a little exciting.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie therefore offers meager pleasures of character. Where it excels is in staging and cinematography. The running sequences, in races, on city streets and through forests, are very well-handled.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The whole plot smells fishy. It's not that the movie is hiding something, but that when it's revealed, it's been left sitting too long at room temperature. Inside Man goes to much difficulty to arrive at too little.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The first half of License to Drive, which is mostly concerned with taking the lessons and passing the test and getting the license, is very funny. The second half, which is mostly an extended chase scene in which a hapless teenager's grandfather's Cadillac is wrecked by a drunk, is much more predictable.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The charm of The Ring Two, while limited, is real enough; it is based on the film's ability to make absolutely no sense, while nevertheless generating a real enough feeling of tension a good deal of the time.

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