For 4,072 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 75% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 23% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Hoosiers
Lowest review score: 0 Tomcats
Score distribution:
4,072 movie reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The part that needs work didn't cost money. It's the screenplay. Having created the characters and fashioned the outline, Tarantino doesn't do much with his characters except to let them talk too much, especially when they should be unconscious from shock and loss of blood.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie does have charm and moments of humor, but what it doesn't have is romance.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Sandler, at the center, is a distraction; he steals scenes, and we want him to give them back.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There's a good story buried somewhere in this melee.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The story, having failed to provide itself with character conflicts that can be resolved with drama, turns to melodrama instead.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Burton's made a film that's respectful to the original, and respectable in itself, but that's not enough. Ten years from now, it will be the 1968 version that people are still renting.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I can't recommend Mission to Mars.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Is this a good movie? Not exactly; too much of it is on automatic pilot, as it must be, to satisfy the fans of the original Shaft. Is it better than I expected? Yes.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Has moments of great imagination.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Doesn't really seem necessary.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Take away the drugs, and this is the story of a boring life in wholesale.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie as a whole lacks the conviction of a real story. It is more like a lush morality play, too leisurely in its storytelling, too sure of its morality.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This is a modest but likable film, and Anjelica Huston plays a heroine who makes us smile.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Has a good heart and some fine performances, but is too muddled at the story level to involve us emotionally.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The remake has a superior caper but less chemistry.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    If I can't quite recommend the movie, it's because so much of the plot is on autopilot. The dialogue spells out too much that doesn't need to be said.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I cannot in strict accuracy recommend this film. It's such a jumble of action and motivation, ill-defined characters and action howlers.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There is a cool, mannered elegance to the picture that I like, but it's dead at its center.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's not the idea that people will kill each other for entertainment that makes Series 7 jolting. What the movie correctly perceives is that somewhere along the line we've lost all sense of shame in our society.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This is the kind of movie you sort of like, and yet even while you're liking it, you're thinking how much better these characters and this situation could have been with a little more imagination and daring.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Not a successful thriller, but with some nice dramatic scenes along with the dumb mystery and contrived conclusion.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The fundamental problem is the point of view.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    One Night at McCool's does not quite work, but it has a lot of fun being a near-miss.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There's not a song I wouldn't hear again with pleasure, or a clip that might not make me smile, but as a whole, it's not much. Like cotton candy, it's better as a concept than as an experience.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    If the movie were not so downbeat and its literary pedigree so distinguished, the resolution would be soap opera.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Could metamorphose into an entertaining sitcom.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The film is elegiac and sad, beautifully mounted, but not as compelling as it should be.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I was interested all through the movie--interested, but not riveted. I cared, but not quite enough.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    If the movie finally doesn't work as well as it should, it may be because the material isn't a good fit for Kitano's hard-edged underlying style.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Has too much docudrama and not enough soul.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Passes the time pleasantly and has a few good laughs.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Works splendidly as a courtroom thriller about military values as long as you don't expect it to seriously consider those values.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    And yet ... gee, the movie is charming, despite its exhausted wheeze of an ancient recycled plot idea.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A movie where the story, like the sub, sometimes seems to be running blind. In its best moments it can evoke fear, and it does a good job of evoking the claustrophobic terror of a little World War II boat.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    O Brother contains sequences that are wonderful in themselves--lovely short films--but the movie never really shapes itself into a whole.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Within Clay Pigeons is a smaller story that might have involved us more, but it's buried by overkill.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    What is wonderful about Angela's Ashes is Emily Watson's performance, and the other roles that are convincingly cast.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I enjoyed a lot of the movie in a relaxed sort of fashion; it's not essential or original in the way "The Truman Show'' was, and it hasn't done any really hard thinking about the ways we interact with TV.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The film takes the form but not the feel of a comic thriller. It's quirkier than that.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    What sets Heathers apart from less intelligent teenage movies is that it has a point of view toward this subject matter - a bleak, macabre and bitingly satirical one.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A moody, effective thriller for about 80 percent of the way, and then our hands close on air. If you walk out before the ending, you'll think it's better than it is.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I have the curious suspicion that it will be enjoyed most by someone who knows absolutely nothing about Shakespeare, and can see it simply as the story of some very strange people who seem to be reading from the same secret script.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There is real wit in Glover's performance. And wit, too, in R. Lee Ermey's performance as the boss, which draws heavily on Ermey's real-life experience as a drill sergeant.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's skillfully mounted and fitfully intriguing, but weaves such a tangled web that at the end I defy anyone in the audience to explain the exact loyalties and motives of the leading characters.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    If the film had been less extreme in the adventures of its heroes, more willing to settle for plausible forms of rebellion, that might have worked. It tries too hard, and overreaches the logic of its own world.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Sweet, light entertainment, but could have been more.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie is so extravagant and outrageous in its storytelling that it resists criticism: It's self-satirizing.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    As light as a feather, as fresh as spring, and as lubricious as a centerfold... There is something extroverted and refreshing in the way these women enjoy their beauty and their sexiness.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A wacky and eccentric heist comedy with many virtues, but it is also a remake of "Big Deal on Madonna Street" (1958), a movie much beloved by me. Some scenes are so close to the original it's kind of uncanny.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I have such an unreasonable affection for this movie, indeed, that it is only by slapping myself alongside the head and drinking black coffee that I can restrain myself from recommending it.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Flashes of inspiration illuminate stretches of routine sitcom material; it's the kind of movie where the audience laughs loudly and then falls silent for the next five minutes.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Too much action brings the movie to a dead standstill. Why don't directors understand that? Why don't they know that wall-to-wall action makes a movie less interesting -- less like drama, more like a repetitive video game?
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Has zest and humor and some lovable supporting characters, but do we really need this zapped-up version of the Robert Louis Stevenson classic? Eighteenth century galleons and pirate ships go sailing through the stars, and it somehow just doesn't look right.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie as a whole looks and occasionally plays better than it is.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It is not a bad movie, mind you; it's clever and shows great control of craft, but it doesn't care, and so it's hard for us to care about. To see it once is to plumb to the bottom of its mysteries, and beyond.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's the kind of movie you can't quite recommend because it is all windup and not much of a pitch, yet you can't bring yourself to dislike it.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Slight and sweet, not a great high school movie but kinda nice, with appealing performances by Hart and Grenier.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A well-made thriller with a lot of good acting, but the death of Elisabeth Campbell is so unnecessarily graphic and gruesome that by the end I felt sort of unclean.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A smaller picture like this, shot out of the mainstream, has a better chance of being quirky and original. And quirky it is, even if not successful.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Because it is slick and classy and good to look at, and the actors are well within their range of competence, you can enjoy the movie on a made-for-TV level, but you wish it had been smarter and tougher.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Comes so close to working that you can see there from here. It has the right approach and the right opening premise, but it lacks the zest and it goes for a plot twist instead of trusting the material.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    In its clumsy way, it throws in comments now and then to show it knows the difference between Arab terrorists and American citizens.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    One of the irritations of Ghost is that the Moore character is such a slow study.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie is finally just a little too ungainly, too jumbled at the end, for me to recommend, but it has heart, and I feel a lot of affection for it.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There is an underlying likability to Austin Powers that sort of carries us through the movie.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The secret may be that Cronenberg approaches his trashy material with the objectivity of a scientist; it is his detached, cold style that makes the material creepy instead of simply sensational.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There was a lot I liked in Cletis Tout, including the performances and the very audacity of details like the magic tricks and the carrier pigeons. But it seemed a shame that the writer and director, Chris Ver Wiel, took a perfectly sound story idea and complicated it into an exercise in style. Less is more.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's the kind of movie you can sit back and enjoy, as long as you don't make the mistake of thinking too much.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It is a brave experiment, based on life and using actors who play themselves, but it buys into the whole false notion that artists are somehow too brilliant to be sober.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I started out liking this movie, while waiting for something really interesting to happen. When nothing did, I still didn't dislike it; I assume the X-Men will further develop their personalities if there is a sequel.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie has been produced by Nickelodeon, and will no doubt satisfy its intended audience enormously. It does not cross over into the post-Nickelodeon universe.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This movie could obviously go on fooling us forever, but we are good sports only up to a point, and then our attention drifts. Shame, since there's so much good stuff in it, like how effortlessly Rachel Griffiths keeps two tough guys completely at her mercy.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The story is determined to be colorful and melodramatic, like a soap opera where the characters suffer in ways that look intriguing.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Here is a movie that embraces its goofiness like a Get Out of Jail Free card.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's fast-footed and fun. "Rugrats in Paris" had charms for grownups, however, Recess: School's Out seems aimed more directly at grade-schoolers.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The film has been directed by Jonathan Parker; he adapted the Melville story with Catherine DiNapoli. It's his first work, and a promising one. I admire it and yet cannot recommend it, because it overstays its natural running time.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie is ambitious, has good energy and is well-acted, but tells a familiar story in a familiar way. The parallels to Brian De Palma's "Scarface" are underlined by scenes from that movie which are watched by the characters in this one.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Plays like it was directed as a do-it-yourself project, following instructions that omitted a few steps, and yet the movie has an undeniable charm.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie is so filled with action that dramatic conflict would be more than we could handle, so all of the characters are nice.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    By the end of the film I conceded, yes, there are good performances and the period is well captured, but the movie didn't convince me of the feel and the flavor of its experiences.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I liked the movie without loving it. It's not great Woody Allen, like "Sweet and Lowdown" or "Bullets Over Broadway," but it's smart and sly, and the blindness is an audacious idea.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Perhaps this movie was so close to Egoyan's heart that he was never able to stand back and get a good perspective on it -- that he is as conflicted as his characters, and as confused in the face of shifting points of view.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It is intensely involving at the outset, but it faces an insoluble problem: The story, like the characters, has no place to go.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Like "The Godfather," it shows him (Makovski) as a crook with certain standards, surrounded by rats with none.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's not good, but it's nowhere near as bad as most recent comedies; it has real laughs, but it misses real opportunities.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A carnival geek show elevated in the direction of art. It never quite gets there, but it tries with every fiber of its craft to redeem its pulp origins, and we must give it credit for the courage of its depravity.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Seems torn between conflicting possibilities: It's structured like a comedy, but there are undertones of darker themes, and I almost wish they'd allowed the plot to lead them into those shadows.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    As a source of information about his life and work, this interview is almost worthless, but as an insight into his style, it is priceless.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The footage on the Paris Island obstacle course is powerful. But Full Metal Jacket is uncertain where to go, and the movie's climax, which Kubrick obviously intends to be a mighty moral revelation, seems phoned in from earlier war pictures.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This is the kind of movie you happen across on TV, and linger to watch out of curiosity, but its inspired moments serve only to point out how routine, and occasionally how slow and wordy, the rest of it is.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I admired Intacto more than I liked it, for its ingenious construction and the way it keeps a certain chilly distance between its story and the dangers of popular entertainment.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I laughed. I did not always feel proud of myself while I was laughing, however.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The origin story is well told, and the characters will not disappoint anyone who values the original comic books. It's in the action scenes that things fall apart.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Harmless, brainless, good-natured fun.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It drifts above the surface of its natural subjects, content to be a genre picture. We're always aware of the formula--and in a picture based on real life, we shouldn't be.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Kurosawa was a great artist and so even his lesser work is interesting -- just as we would love to find one last lost play, however minor, by his hero Shakespeare.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Is Terminator 3 a skillful piece of work? Indeed. Will it entertain the Friday night action crowd? You bet. Does it tease and intrigue us like the earlier films did? Not really.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A high-speed, high-tech kiddie thriller that's kinda cute but sorta relentless.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie exhibits the usual indifference to the issues involved. Although it was written and directed by Elie Chouraqui, a Frenchman, it is comfortably xenophobic. Most Americans have never understood the differences among Croats, Serbs and Bosnians, and this film is no help.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    With a cleaner story line, the basic idea could have been free to deliver. As it is, we get a better movie than we might have, because the performances are so good.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The ending doesn't work, as I've said, but most of the movie works so well I'm almost recommending it, anyway -- maybe not to everybody, but certainly to people with a curiosity about how a movie can go very right, and then step wrong.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The fancy stuff and foolery impedes the story and its emotions; the underlying story was strong enough that maybe a traditional narrative would have been best, after all.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    In drawing out his effects, Amenabar is a little too confident that style can substitute for substance. As our suspense was supposed to be building, our impatience was outstripping it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The edge is missing from Guest's usual style. Maybe it's because his targets are, after all, so harmless.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Lopez and Affleck are sweet and appealing in their performances; the buzz said they didn't have chemistry, but the buzz was wrong. What they don't have is conviction.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I think the screenplay, written by director Isabel Coixet, is shameless in its weepy sentiment. But there is truth here, too, and a convincing portrait of working-class lives.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie has many scenes of delicious comedy, Clooney and Zeta-Jones play their characters perfectly in an imperfect screenplay.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Meg Ryan does such an effective job of evoking her sexually hungry lonely girl that it might have been better to just follow that line and not distract her and the audience with the distraction of a crime plot.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    What I got was a fairly intriguing story and an actual plot that is actually resolved. That doesn't make the movie good enough to recommend, but it makes it better than the ads suggest.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Honey doesn't have a shred of originality (except for the high-energy choreography), but there's something fundamentally reassuring about a movie that respects ancient formulas; it's like a landmark preservation program.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Big Fish of course is a great-looking film, with a fantastical visual style that could be called Felliniesque if Burton had not by now earned the right to the adjective Burtonesque.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The first three minutes convince us we're are looking at a commercial before the feature begins. Then we realize the whole movie will look like this.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There's so much flashing forward and backward, so many spins of fate, so many chapters in the journals, that after awhile I felt that I, as well as time, was being jerked around.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    One of the sly pleasures of Latter Days is the sight of this gay-themed movie recycling so many conventions from straight romantic cinema, as if it's time to catch up.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Did I like the film? Yeah, kinda, but not enough to recommend. The first film arrived with freshness and an unexpected zing, but this one seems too content to follow in its footsteps.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie's shot in black and white; Allen is one of the rare and valuable directors who sometimes insists in working in the format that is the soul of cinema.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There will be better movies playing in the same theater, even if it is a duplex, but on the other hand there is something to be said for goofiness without apology by broken lizards who just wanna have fun.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Some of the bits work and others don't, but no one seems to be keeping score, and that's part of the movie's charm.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    You can enjoy the way they create little flashes of wit in the dialogue, which enlivens what is, after all, a formula disaster movie.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Apart from funny supporting work by the inventor of the Mind Control and the guy in the "Q" role, the movie is pretty routine.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Besson has a natural gift for plunging into drama with a charged-up visual style.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A fairly competent recycling of familiar ingredients, given an additional interest because of Harrison Ford's personal appeal.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I could see how, with a rewrite and a better focus, this could have been a film of "Braveheart'' quality instead of basically just a costume swashbuckler.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The Coens' Ladykillers, on the other hand, is always wildly signaling for us to notice it. Not content to be funny, it wants to be FUNNY! Have you ever noticed that the more a comedian wears funny hats, the less funny he is?
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's only 76 minutes long, but although kids will like it, their parents will be sneaking looks at their watches.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The Prince & Me has the materials to be a heartwarming mass-market love story, but it doesn't assemble them convincingly.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    How Stella Got Her Groove Back tries its best to turn a paperback romance into a relationship worth making a movie about, but fails.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Employs superb craftsmanship and a powerful Denzel Washington performance in an attempt to elevate genre material above its natural level, but it fails. The underlying story isn't worth the effort.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It isn't a successful movie but is sometimes a very interesting one, and there is real charm and comic agility by the two leads.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Is the film worth seeing? Well, yes and no. Yes, because it is exactly what it is, and no, for the same reason.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    For all of its huge budget, Independence Day is a timid movie when it comes to imagination. The aliens, when we finally see them, are a serious disappointment.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    You want loud, dumb, skillful, escapist entertainment? Twister works. You want to think? Think twice about seeing it.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie seemed the stuff of anecdote, not drama, and as the alleged protagonist, Luca/Franco is too young much of the time to play more than a bystander's role.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's the kind of movie that provides diversion for the idle channel-surfer but isn't worth a trip to the theater. A lot of it seems cobbled together out of spare parts.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This is not great comedy, and Wayans doesn't find ways to build and improvise, as Carrey does.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Not a conventional documentary about quantum physics. It's more like a collision in the editing room between talking heads, an impenetrable human parable and a hallucinogenic animated cartoon.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The result is a reassuring fairy tale that will fascinate children and has moments of natural beauty for their parents, but makes the tigers approximately as realistic as the animals in "The Lion King."
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The result is unconvincing and disorganized. Yes, there are some spectacular stunts and slick special effects sequences. Yes, Jones is right on the money, and Snipes makes a sympathetic fugitive. But it's the story that has to pull this train, and its derailment is about as definitive as the train crash in the earlier film.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Clint Eastwood's film is a determined attempt to be faithful to the book's spirit, but something ineffable is lost just by turning on the camera: Nothing we see can be as amazing as what we've imagined.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The problem with Code 46 is that the movie, filled with ideas and imagination, is murky in its rules and intentions. I cannot say I understand the hows and whys of this future world, nor do I much care, since it's mostly a clever backdrop to a love affair that would easily teleport to many other genres.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Since you have probably not seen "Nine Queens," Criminal will be new to you, and I predict you'll like the remake about as much as I liked the original -- three stars' worth. If, however, you've seen "Nine Queens," you may agree that some journeys, however entertaining, need only be taken once.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Seen simply as a film, The Motorcycle Diaries is attenuated and tedious. We understand that Ernesto and Alberto are friends, but that's about all we find out about them; they develop none of the complexities of other on-the-road couples, like Thelma and Louise, Bonnie and Clyde or Huck and Jim. There isn't much chemistry.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Unfortunately, the parts of the movie that are truly good are buried beneath the deadening layers of thriller cliches and an unconvincing love story.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It is not a serious film about its subject, nor is it quite a dark comedy, despite some of Pacino's good lines. The epilogue, indeed, cheats in a way I thought had been left behind in grade school. And yet there are splendid moments.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie, unfortunately, doesn't really work; it's one of those films where the characters always seem to be Behaving, as if ordinary life has to be jacked up into eccentricity.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Annette Bening plays Julia in a performance that has great verve and energy, and just as well, because the basic material is wheezy melodrama.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Sex Is Comedy is not sure what it's really about, or how to get there; the director is seen as flighty and impulsive, the situations seem like set-ups, and we never know what the Actor and Actress are really thinking -- or if thinking has anything to do with it.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It looks great. The technical credits are impeccable, and Clooney and Kidman negotiate assorted dangers skillfully. But it's mostly spare parts from other thrillers.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Seven Years in Tibet is an ambitious and beautiful movie with much to interest the patient viewer, but it makes the common mistake of many films about travelers and explorers: It is more concerned with their adventures than with what they discover.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The visual style is all Zeffirelli, and it is interesting that the opera-within-the-film is not skimped on, as is usually the case in films containing scenes from other productions.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The damnedest film. I can't recommend it, but I would not for one second discourage you from seeing it.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There is no one in the movie to provide a reasonable reaction to anything; the adults are all demented, evil, or, in the case of Mr. Poe, stunningly lacking in perception, and the kids are plucky enough, but rather dazed by their misfortunes.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Doesn't quite click.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Never quite lifts off. The elements are here, but not the magic.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie's problem is a fundamental lack of substance.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Has little islands of humor and even perfection, floating in a sea of missed marks and murky intentions.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    So heavy on incident, contrivance, coincidence, improbability, sudden reversals and dizzying flash-forwards (sometimes years at a time) that it seems a wonder the characters don't crash into each other in the confusion.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The film doesn't make us work, doesn't allow us to figure out things for ourselves, is afraid we'll miss things if they're not spelled out.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A decent futuristic action picture with some great sets, some intriguing ideas, and a few images that will stay with me.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    An enjoyable film, and yet it left me somehow unsatisfied...there is too much contrivance in the way [Austen] dispatches her men to London when she is done with them.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It circles the possibility of mental and spiritual infidelity like a cat wondering if a mouse might still be alive. Watching it, I felt it would be fascinating to see a movie that was really, truthfully, fearlessly about this subject.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Does it by the numbers, so efficiently this feels more like a Hollywood wannabe than a French film. Where's the quirkiness, the nuance, the deeper levels?
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The filmmakers must have known they were not making a good movie, but they didn't use that as an excuse to be boring and lazy. Barb Wire has a high energy level, and a sense of deranged fun.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The curious case of two appealing performances surviving a bombardment of schlock.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The premise is intriguing, and for a time it seems that the Date Doctor may indeed know things about women that most men in the movies are not allowed to know, but the third act goes on autopilot just when the Doctor should be in.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    On balance, I think it's an interesting miss, but a movie you might enjoy if (a) you don't expect a masterpiece, and (b) you like the dialogue in Quentin Tarantino movies.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Her Majesty is the kind of movie where you start out smiling, and then smile more broadly, and then really smile, and then realize with a sinking heart that the filmmakers are losing it.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A lot of Murder at 1600 is well -done. Characters are introduced vividly,; there's a sense of realism in the White House scenes, and some of the dialogue by Wayne Beach and David Hodgin hits a nice ironic note. But then the movie kicks into auto - pilot. The last third of the film is a ready-made action movie plug-in.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There is something not quite right about the film itself.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The charm of The Ring Two, while limited, is real enough; it is based on the film's ability to make absolutely no sense, while nevertheless generating a real enough feeling of tension a good deal of the time.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The documentary visits elderly women who, then and now, can best be described as tough broads, and listens as they describe the early days of women's wrestling. What they say is not as revealing as how they say it.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Variable ratings: The Hand (4 stars), Equilibrium (3 stars), The Dangerous Thread of Things (1 star).
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Theater of the absurd, masquerading as an action thriller.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Madagascar is funny, especially at the beginning, and good-looking in a retro cartoon way, but in a world where the stakes have been raised by "Finding Nemo," "Shrek" and "The Incredibles," it's a throwback to a more conventional kind of animated entertainment. It'll be fun for the smaller kids, but there's not much crossover appeal for their parents.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    But the problem is, The Deal, like a lot of real-life Wall Street deals, is a labyrinth into which the plot tends to disappear. The ideas in the film are challenging, the level of expertise is high, the performances are convincing, and it's only at the level of story construction and dramatic clarity that the film doesn't succeed.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    While the movie contains delights and inventions without pause and has undeniable charm, while it is always wonderful to watch, while it has the Miyazaki visual wonderment, it's a disappointment, compared to his recent work.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's one of those movies where you smile and laugh and are reasonably entertained, but you get no sense of a mighty enterprise sweeping you along with its comedic force. There is not a movie here. Just scenes in search of one.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Maintains a certain level of intrigue, and occasionally bursts into life.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The Aristocrats might have made a nice short subject. At 87 minutes, it's like the boozy salesman who corners you with the Pinocchio torture.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Artfully designed to appeal to lovers of romance and books, but by the end of the film I was not convinced it knew much about either.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    One of those movies that explains too much while it is explaining too little, and leaves us with a surprise at the end that makes more sense the less we think about it. But the movie's mastery of technique makes up for a lot.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Since it is by Wong Kar Wai, 2046 is visually stunning. He uses three cinematographers but one style, that tries to evoke mood more than meaning. The movie as a whole, unfortunately, never seems sure of itself. It's like a sketchbook. These are images, tones, dialogue and characters that Wong is sure of, and he practices them, but he does not seem very sure why he is making the movie, or where it should end.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There are many moments here that are very funny, but the film as a whole is a bit too long.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Dante's Peak, written by Leslie Bohem and directed by Roger Donaldson, follows the disaster formula so faithfully that if you walk in while the movie is in progress, you can estimate how long the story has to run. That it is skillful is a tribute to the filmmakers.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The moral reasoning in the film is so confusing that only by completely sidestepping it can the plot work at all.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Hotel de Love is a pleasant and sometimes funny film, without being completely satisfying.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    When the film was over I was not particularly pleased that I had seen it; it was mostly behavior and contrivance. While it was running, I was not bored.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie is sort of a sideways version of "Sideways," even down to a scene where the two men join two women for dinner. The difference is, in "Sideways" the guys desperately want to impress the women, and in The Thing About My Folks, they want to impress each other.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Good fun, especially if you like Leone's way of savoring the last morsel of every scene. (Review of Original Release)
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Three Days of Rain is only a sketch compared to the power of Rodrigo Garcia's "Nine Lives," which continues to grow in my memory.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang contains a lot of comedy and invention, but doesn't much benefit from its clever style. The characters and plot are so promising that maybe Black should have backed off and told the story deadpan, instead of mugging so shamelessly for laughs.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    What's funny in cartoons is not always funny in live action, and some of the dunkings in unsavory substances left me less than amused.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    What is good about this film is very good, but there are too many side trips, in both the plot and the emotions, for the film to draw us in fully.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There is no rhythm to the movie, no ebb and flow; it's all flat-out spectacle.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie did make me smile. It didn't make me laugh, and it didn't involve my emotions, or the higher regions of my intellect, for that matter. It's a perfectly acceptable feature cartoon for kids up to a certain age, but it doesn't have the universal appeal of some of the best recent animation.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It leads to one of those endings where you sit there wishing they'd tried a little harder to think up something better.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Derailed has a great setup, a good middle passage and some convincing performances. Then it runs off the tracks.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    On film, Rent is the sound of one hand clapping.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I object to the movie not on sociological grounds but because I suspect a real geisha house floated on currents deeper and more subtle than the broad melodrama on display here.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Recycles the 1977 comedy right down to repeating the same mistakes.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    But the film is not as amusing as the premise, and there were long stretches when I'd had quite enough of Mrs. Doubtfire.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This is a great-looking movie, a triumph of set design and special effects, creating a fantasy world halfway between suburbia and a prehistoric cartoon.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The Santa Clause (so named after the clause on Santa's calling card that requires Scott to take over the job) is often a clever and amusing movie, and there's a lot of fresh invention in it.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I liked it in the same way I might like an arcade game: It holds your attention until you run out of quarters, and then you wander away without giving it another thought.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The story is sometimes overwritten, often overwrought, includes an overheard conversation on the "Nancy Drew" level, and yet holds our attention and contains surprises right until the end.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There are scenes that don't even pretend to work. And others that have a sweetness and visual beauty that stops time and simply invites you to share.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The whole plot smells fishy. It's not that the movie is hiding something, but that when it's revealed, it's been left sitting too long at room temperature. Inside Man goes to much difficulty to arrive at too little.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie is nice to look at, the colors and details are elegant, the animals engaging, the action fast-moving, but I don't think older viewers will like it as much as the kids.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The real objective of all the "M:I" movies is to provide a clothesline for sensational action scenes. Nothing else matters, and explanatory dialogue would only slow things down. This formula worked satisfactorily in "M:I," directed by Brian De Palma, and "M:I II," directed by John Woo, and I suppose it works up to a point in M:I III, directed by J.J. Abrams, if what you want is endless, nonstop high-tech action.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    When a movie begins to present one implausible or unwise decision after another, when its world plays too easily into the hands of its story, when the taste for symbolism creates impossible scenes, we grow restless.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Sometimes in an imperfect movie there is consolation simply in regarding the actors.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    When a film telling three stories and spanning thousands of years has a running time of 96 minutes, scenes must have been cut out. There will someday be a Director’s Cut of this movie, and that’s the cut I want to see.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    We go expecting to be inspired and uplifted, and we leave somewhat satisfied in those areas, but with reluctant questions about how well the story has aged, and how relevant it is today.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Because it is light and stylish and good-hearted, it is quite possible to enjoy, in the right frame of mind. This is more of a movie to see on video, on an empty night when you need something to hurl at the gloom.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Both impressive and disappointing. From a technical and craft point of view it is first-rate; from its standing in the canon of the two directors, it is minor.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It comes to life in the dance sequences, and then drifts away again.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie is too flighty and uncentered, and it allows actual violence to break the spell when false alarms would have sufficed.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie breaks down into anecdotes that don't flow or build, and everything is narrated by the Gilot character.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Coppola's new film is not so much about the car as about the man, and it is with the man that he fails to deliver.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The Big Chill is a splendid technical exercise. It has all the right moves. It knows all the right words. Its characters have all the right clothes, expressions, fears, lusts and ambitions. But there's no payoff and it doesn't lead anywhere. I thought at first that was a weakness of the movie. There also is the possibility that it's the movie's message.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    M. Butterfly does not take hold the way the stage play did.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    While I admired it in an abstract way, I felt repelled by the material on a visceral level.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It is done well, yet one is still surprised to find it done at all.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Fatal Attraction is a spellbinding psychological thriller that could have been a great movie if the filmmakers had not thrown character and plausibility to the winds in the last minutes to give us their version of a grown-up "Friday the 13th."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A damped-down return to the Kingdom of Far Far Away, lacking the comic energy of the first brilliant film and not measuring up to the second.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    You watch, you are absorbed, and from scene to scene, Henry Fool seems to be adding up, but then your hand closes on air. I am left unsure of my response - of any response.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Father of the Bride Part II is not a great movie and not even as good as its 1991 inspiration. But it is warm and fuzzy, and has some good laughs and a lot of sweetness.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I found the idea of the plot more interesting than the plot itself, and am finding the movie more fun to write about than to see.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Coppola's teenagers seem trapped inside too many layers of storytelling.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    For all of its sensational stunts and flashes of wit, however, Last Action Hero plays more like a bright idea than like a movie that was thought through. It doesn't evoke the mystery of the barrier between audience and screen the way Woody Allen did, and a lot of the time it simply seems to be standing around commenting on itself.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The experience of watching The Doors is not always very pleasant.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Ocean's Thirteen proceeds with insouciant dialogue, studied casualness, and a lotta stuff happening, none of which I cared much about because the movie doesn't pause to develop the characters, who are forced to make do with their movie-star personas.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This good movie is buried beneath millions of dollars that were spent on "production values" that wreck the show.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Tequila Sunrise is an intriguing movie with interesting characters, but it might have worked better if it had found a cleaner narrative line from beginning to end. It's hard to surrender yourself to a film that seems to be toying with you.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Empire of the Sun adds up to a promising idea, a carefully observed production and some interesting performances.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie operates at the level of a literate sitcom, in which the dialogue is smart and the characters are original, but the outcome and most of the stops along the way are preordained.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie's dialogue is constructed out of funny names, puns and old jokes. Sometimes it's painfully juvenile. But there are some great visual gags in the movie, and the best is Pizza the Hutt, a creature who roars and cajoles while cheese melts off its forehead and big hunks of pepperoni slide down its jowls.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The performances are often good, including Reno's; he has an interesting, poker-faced way of underplaying scenes that keeps him from being a stereotyped kid.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There's some good stuff in the movie, including a cast that's good right down the line and a willingness to have some fun with teenage culture in the Mass Murder Capital. But when everything is all over, there's nothing to leave the theater with - no real horrors, no real dread, no real imagination - just technique at the service of formula.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There is a very good movie named "Before Sunset" that begins more or less where this one ends. Which tells you something right there.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Whatever happened to the delight and, if you'll excuse the term, the magic in the "Harry Potter" series? As the characters grow up, the stories grow, too, leaving the innocence behind and confusing us with plots so labyrinthine that it takes a Ph.D from Hogwarts to figure them out.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie is lightweight, as it should be.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's a film you enjoy in pieces, but the jigsaw never gets solved.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    As it is, Illegal Tender works as a melodrama, and it benefits enormously from the performance of Wanda DeJesus.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie itself is sort of bland and obvious and comfortable.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The first movie combining Ping-Pong and kung-fu and co-starring Maggie Q. How many could there be?
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Wan's movie is very efficient. Bacon, skilled pro that he is, provides the character the movie needs, just as he has in such radically different films as "Where the Truth Lies," "The Woodsman" and "Mystic River."
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Johnnie To, the director, is highly respected in this genre, and I suppose he does it about as well as you'd want it to be done, unless you wanted acting and more coherence.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It is well-made, well-photographed and plausibly acted, and is better than it needs to be.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie isn't laugh out loud funny, under the circumstances, but it is bittersweet and wistfully amusing; the actors enjoy lachrymosity. We witness the birth of a new genre, the Post-Slasher Movie.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Just remember that its hero stands for countless others.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I found the opening third tremendously intriguing and involving, I thought the emotions were so real they could be touched, but then the film lost its way and fell into the clutches of sentimental melodrama.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Weighed down by its splendor. There are scenes where the costumes are so sumptuous, the sets so vast, the music so insistent, that we lose sight of the humans behind the dazzle of the production.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There is a long stretch toward the beginning of the film when we're interested, under the delusion that it's going somewhere. When we begin to suspect it's going in circles, our interest flags, and at the end, while rousing music plays, I would have preferred the Peggy Lee version of "Is That All There Is?"
    • 32 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There's not much original about the film, but it's played with high spirits and good cheer, there are lots of musical interludes, and it's pitched straight at families.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    All plausibility is gone, we sit back, detached, to watch stunt men and special effects guys take over a movie that promised to be the kind of story audiences could identify with.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Whimsy with a capital W. No, it's WHIMSY in all caps. Make that all-caps italic boldface. Oh, never mind. I'm getting too whimsical.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's so clever that finally that's all it is: clever.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Tells an engrossing story of a remarkable man, but nevertheless it's underwhelming. Dramatic and romantic tension never coil very tightly, as the film settles into a contented pace.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Living these lives, for these people, must have been sad and tedious, and so, inevitably, is their story, and it must be said, the film about it.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Tells the kind of story that would feel right at home in a silent film, and I suppose I mean that as a compliment.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    By the time the Incredible Hulk had completed his hulk-on-hulk showdown with the Incredible Blonsky, I had been using my Timex with the illuminated dial way too often.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A sweet but inconsequential romantic comedy.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Broderick is splendid as the gambler. He knows, as many addicts do, that the addictive personality is very inward, however much acting out might take place.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie presents the surfaces of Obermaier's life but never lets us understand who she was.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    What's lacking is a feeling for the heat and deafening chaos of actual club shows. The movie hangs back a little, folds its arms and nods its head, rather than rushing the stage or diving into the mosh pit. The tumult is depicted, not captured.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The best performance, because it's more nuanced, is by Liev Schreiber. His Zus Bielski is more concerned with the big picture, more ideological, more driven by tactics.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Twilight will mesmerize its target audience, 16-year-old girls and their grandmothers. Their mothers know all too much about boys like this.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Some stretches are very funny, although the laughter is undermined by the desperation and sadness of the situations.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A perfectly acceptable brainless action thriller.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's innocent and sometimes kind of charming. The sets are entertaining. There are parallels in appearance and theme to a low-rent "Dark City."
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Some of the stories are pretty good, especially Charles Burns' tale involving a nasty and vaguely humanoid insect that burrows under the skin.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Some of these stories are fascinating and some are heartbreaking, but together they seem too contrived.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie's premise devalues any relationship, makes futile any friendship or romance, and spits, not into the face of destiny, but backward into the maw of time. It even undermines the charm of compound interest.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    All of this makes an interesting, if not gripping, film about the play, the playwright and the lead-up work to a stage production. It also leaves me wanting a great deal more.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This is a harmless and pleasant Disney comedy and one of only three family movies playing over the holidays.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A sweet, innocent family movie about stray dogs that seem as well-trained as Olympic champions. Friday, the Jack Russell terrier who's the leader of the pack, does more acting than most of the humans, and doesn't even get billing.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Taken shows Mills as a one-man rescue squad, a master of every skill, a laser-eyed, sharpshooting, pursuit-driving, pocket-picking, impersonating, knife-fighting, torturing, karate-fighting killing machine who can cleverly turn over a petrol tank with one pass in his car and strategically ignite it with another.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It glories in its silliness, and the actors are permitted the sort of goofy acting that distinguished screwball comedy. We get double takes, slow burns, pratfalls, exploding clothes wardrobes, dropped trays, tear-away dresses, missing maids of honor, overnight fame, public disgrace and not, amazingly, a single obnoxious cat or dog.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This is not a film most people will enjoy. Its qualities are apparent only if appreciates cinematic style for itself.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Look at the performances. They're surprisingly good, and I especially admired the work of Monica Potter and Tony Goldwyn as the parents of one of two girls who go walking in the woods.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I think Dwayne Johnson has a likable screen presence and is a good choice for an innocuous family entertainment like this.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This movie is lively at times, it's lovely to look at, and the actors are persuasive in very difficult material. But around and around it goes, and where it stops, nobody by that point much cares.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Although not bowling me over, Planet 51 is a jolly and good-looking animated feature in glorious 2-D.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Do these films reflect actual aspects of modern Tokyo? The hikikomori epidemic is apparently real enough, but the other two segments seem more deliberately fantastical. The entertainment value? Medium to high: "Merde." Tokyo? Still standing.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    3-D is a distraction and an annoyance.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    They (the characters) approach the subjects of sex and romance with a naivete so staggering, it must be an embarrassment in the greater world. Inside their hermetically sealed complacency, I suppose it's a little exciting.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    On the basis of Gigantic, Matt Aselton can make a fine and original film. This isn't quite it, but it has moments so good, all you wish for is a second draft.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's pleasant and amusing. If I had seen it before I was born, I would have loved it.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I can't really recommend the film, unless you admire Caine as much as I do, which is certainly possible.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    If The Informers doesn't sound to you like a pleasant time at the movies, you are right. To repeat: dread, despair and doom. It is often however repulsively fascinating and has been directed by Gregor Jordan as a soap opera from hell, with good sets and costumes.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The Soloist has all the elements of an uplifting drama, except for the uplift.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Julie & Julia is not lacking in entertainment value, especially with the Streep performance. But if the men had been portrayed as more high-spirited, it might have taken on intriguing dimensions.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A pleasant, inoffensive 3-D animated farce about a team of superspy gophers.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There is clear definition between closer and further elements. I've seen a lot of 3-D recently, and in terms of technical quality, this is the best.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There's not much wrong with Tony Scott's The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3, except that there's not much really right about it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Baratz doesn't ask any of the obvious questions, preferring to observe uncritically, and if you can do the same, you may find Unmistaken Child worth seeing. I could not, and grew restless.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Amusing without ever being break-out funny.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Dead Snow, as you may have gathered, is a comedy, but played absolutely seriously by sincere, earnest young actors.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This intriguing premise, alas, ends as so many movies do these days, with fierce fights and bloodshed.

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