For 4,338 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 74% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 24% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Hugo
Lowest review score: 0 I Spit on Your Grave
Score distribution:
4338 movie reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Passes the time pleasantly and has a few good laughs.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It isn't a masterpiece, but it is a good-hearted, sweet comedy, featuring an overland chase that isn't original but sure is energetic.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    In its clumsy way, it throws in comments now and then to show it knows the difference between Arab terrorists and American citizens.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie breaks down into anecdotes that don't flow or build, and everything is narrated by the Gilot character.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Green Lantern does not intend to be plausible. It intends to be a sound-and-light show, assaulting the audience with sensational special effects. If that's what you want, that's what you get.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This is the kind of movie you happen across on TV, and linger to watch out of curiosity, but its inspired moments serve only to point out how routine, and occasionally how slow and wordy, the rest of it is.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It drifts above the surface of its natural subjects, content to be a genre picture. We're always aware of the formula--and in a picture based on real life, we shouldn't be.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This movie will no doubt be pitched to the same audiences that loved "The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel." It even brings Maggie Smith along. But it lacks that film's life, intelligence and spirit. It has a good heart. I'll give it that. Maybe what it needs is more exotic marigolds.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Sex Is Comedy is not sure what it's really about, or how to get there; the director is seen as flighty and impulsive, the situations seem like set-ups, and we never know what the Actor and Actress are really thinking -- or if thinking has anything to do with it.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    An enjoyable film, and yet it left me somehow unsatisfied...there is too much contrivance in the way [Austen] dispatches her men to London when she is done with them.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The moral reasoning in the film is so confusing that only by completely sidestepping it can the plot work at all.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Seven Years in Tibet is an ambitious and beautiful movie with much to interest the patient viewer, but it makes the common mistake of many films about travelers and explorers: It is more concerned with their adventures than with what they discover.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's fast-footed and fun. "Rugrats in Paris" had charms for grownups, however, Recess: School's Out seems aimed more directly at grade-schoolers.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The Thing is basically just a geek show, a gross-out movie in which teenagers can dare one another to watch the screen. There's nothing wrong with that; I like being scared and I was scared by many scenes in The Thing. But it seems clear that Carpenter made his choice early on to concentrate on the special effects and the technology and to allow the story and people to become secondary.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Pleasant and well-acted and easy to watch.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's not enough to like such films because they're "so bad they're good." You need to specialize, and like the films because they're so good about being so bad they're good. Modus Operandi, a film by Frankie Latina that has won praise on the midnight movie festival circuit, is such a film.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    What sets Heathers apart from less intelligent teenage movies is that it has a point of view toward this subject matter - a bleak, macabre and bitingly satirical one.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Clint Eastwood's film is a determined attempt to be faithful to the book's spirit, but something ineffable is lost just by turning on the camera: Nothing we see can be as amazing as what we've imagined.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The real objective of all the "M:I" movies is to provide a clothesline for sensational action scenes. Nothing else matters, and explanatory dialogue would only slow things down. This formula worked satisfactorily in "M:I," directed by Brian De Palma, and "M:I II," directed by John Woo, and I suppose it works up to a point in M:I III, directed by J.J. Abrams, if what you want is endless, nonstop high-tech action.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It offers wonderful things, but they aren't what's important. It's as if Burton directed at arm's length, unwilling to find juice in the story.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The part that needs work didn't cost money. It's the screenplay. Having created the characters and fashioned the outline, Tarantino doesn't do much with his characters except to let them talk too much, especially when they should be unconscious from shock and loss of blood.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    One of the irritations of Ghost is that the Moore character is such a slow study.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This good movie is buried beneath millions of dollars that were spent on "production values" that wreck the show.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    To give the movie credit, it's as bored with the underlying plot as we are. Even the prom queen election is only a backdrop for more interesting material, as She's All That explores differences in class and style, and peppers its screenplay with very funny little moments.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The best performance, because it's more nuanced, is by Liev Schreiber. His Zus Bielski is more concerned with the big picture, more ideological, more driven by tactics.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    There's not much original about the film, but it's played with high spirits and good cheer, there are lots of musical interludes, and it's pitched straight at families.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Act of Valor is gift-wrapped in patriotism. It was once intended as a recruitment film, and that's how it plays.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    O Brother contains sequences that are wonderful in themselves--lovely short films--but the movie never really shapes itself into a whole.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's skillfully mounted and fitfully intriguing, but weaves such a tangled web that at the end I defy anyone in the audience to explain the exact loyalties and motives of the leading characters.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Tequila Sunrise is an intriguing movie with interesting characters, but it might have worked better if it had found a cleaner narrative line from beginning to end. It's hard to surrender yourself to a film that seems to be toying with you.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    She (Taymor) doesn't capture Shakespeare's tone (or his meaning, I believe), but she certainly has boldness in her reinvention.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie does have charm and moments of humor, but what it doesn't have is romance.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    A sweet, innocent family movie about stray dogs that seem as well-trained as Olympic champions. Friday, the Jack Russell terrier who's the leader of the pack, does more acting than most of the humans, and doesn't even get billing.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The weakness of the film is the weakness of the leading role. That's not a criticism of Mark Wahlberg, who has a quite capable range, but of how he and Russell see the character.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    We can enjoy the suspense of the opening scenes, and some of the drama. The performances are in keeping with the material. But toward the end, when we realize that the entire reality of the film is problematical, there is a certain impatience. It's as if our chain is being yanked.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    One of the problems with Mel Brooks's High Anxiety is that it picks a tricky target: It's a spoof of the work of Alfred Hitchcock, but Hitchcock's films are often funny themselves. And satire works best when its target is self-important.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's innocent and sometimes kind of charming. The sets are entertaining. There are parallels in appearance and theme to a low-rent "Dark City."
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The story is determined to be colorful and melodramatic, like a soap opera where the characters suffer in ways that look intriguing.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Dead Snow, as you may have gathered, is a comedy, but played absolutely seriously by sincere, earnest young actors.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It looks great. The technical credits are impeccable, and Clooney and Kidman negotiate assorted dangers skillfully. But it's mostly spare parts from other thrillers.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    As a source of information about his life and work, this interview is almost worthless, but as an insight into his style, it is priceless.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's a film you enjoy in pieces, but the jigsaw never gets solved.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Absorbing, if somewhat slow-paced, and has without doubt the most blood-curdling scene of live childbirth in a PG-13 movie.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It circles the possibility of mental and spiritual infidelity like a cat wondering if a mouse might still be alive. Watching it, I felt it would be fascinating to see a movie that was really, truthfully, fearlessly about this subject.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This is not a film most people will enjoy. Its qualities are apparent only if appreciates cinematic style for itself.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Seen simply as a film, The Motorcycle Diaries is attenuated and tedious. We understand that Ernesto and Alberto are friends, but that's about all we find out about them; they develop none of the complexities of other on-the-road couples, like Thelma and Louise, Bonnie and Clyde or Huck and Jim. There isn't much chemistry.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Muppet Treasure Island, directed by Brian Henson, son of the late Muppet genius, will entertain you more or less in proportion to your affection for the Muppets. If you like them, you'll probably like this.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    It's the kind of movie you can sit back and enjoy, as long as you don't make the mistake of thinking too much.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The problem with a story like this is that it's almost too perfect. It tends to break out of the boundaries of the typical sports movie, and undermine those easy cliches that are so reassuring to sports fans.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    After seeing Gere and Roberts play much smarter people (even in romantic comedies), it is painful to see them dumbed down here. The screenplay is so sluggish, they're like Derby winners made to carry extra weight.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Never quite attains takeoff velocity.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Never comes alive.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    That the movie is fun is undeniable. That it is bad is inarguable.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Strange, how good feardotcom is, and how bad. The screenplay is a mess, and yet the visuals are so creative this is one of the rare bad films you might actually want to see.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie's problem is that no one seemed to have any fun making it, and it's hard to have much fun watching it. It's a depressing experience.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A movie with a lot of funny one-liners, but no place to go with them.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There's a point at which the plot crosses an invisible line, becoming so preposterous that it's no longer moving and is just plain weird.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Love is blind, and movies about that blindness can be maddening.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Class is a prep-school retread of "The Graduate" that knows some of its scenes are funny and some are serious, but never figures out quite how they should go together. The result is an uncomfortable, inconsistent movie that doesn't really pay off -- a movie in which everything points to two absolutely key scenes that are, inexplicably, the two most awkward scenes in the film.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Too cluttered and busy, but as a glimpse into the affluent culture of a country with economic extremes, it's intriguing. Occasionally it's funny and moving, too.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    All of this is intriguing material, but the movie doesn't do much with it.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Proves to be unsatisfactory because it establishes a well-defined group of characters and shows them disrupted by the careless behavior of a tiresome young woman and two adults who allow themselves to be motivated in one way or another by her infectious libido.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    In the real world, Elle Woods would be chewed up faster than one of little Bruiser's Milk-Bones.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The screenplay creates a sense of foreboding and afterboding, but no actual boding.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There is no entry portal in The Rules of Attraction, and I spent most of the movie feeling depressed by the shallow, selfish, greedy characters. I wanted to be at another party.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It's a long, shapeless, undisciplined mess, and every once in awhile it generates a big laugh.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    They had a great idea here. It's too bad they didn't follow it through on a human level, instead of making it feel made up and artificial and twice-removed, from the everyday experience it pretends to be about.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    As an idea, the film is fascinating, but as an experience it grows tedious; the concerts lack closeups, the sex lacks context, and Antarctica could use a few penguins.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    That the new Casanova lacks such wit is fatal. Heath Ledger is a good actor but Hallstrom's film is busy and unfocused, giving us the view of Casanova's ceaseless activity but not the excitement. It's a sitcom when what is wanted is comic opera.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is pleasant enough, but never quite reaches critical mass as a comedy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    They are, in fact, likable. That's why their comedy is so sad.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The plot is lame, but that doesn't matter, because Dumb and Dumber is essentially pitched at the level of an "Airplane!"-style movie, with rapid-fire sight gags.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    My own feeling is that the film is one more assault on the notion that young American audiences might be expected to enjoy films with at least some subtlety and depth and pacing and occasional quietness. The filmmakers apparently believe their audience suffers from ADD, and so they supply breakneck action and screaming sound volumes at all times.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The Distinguished Gentleman prefers to give us measured laughs at a leisurely pace, and then it settles for the sellout upbeat ending. Ho hum.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The Fog is encouraging because it contains another demonstration of Carpenter's considerable directing talents. He picked the wrong story, I think, but he directs it with a flourish. This isn't a great movie but it does show great promise from Carpenter.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A few loopholes I can forgive. But when a plot is riddled with them -- I get distracted.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Soppy and sentimental, it evokes "Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood" without improving on it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    On a technical level, there's a lot to be said for Die Hard. It's when we get to some of the unnecessary adornments of the script that the movie shoots itself in the foot.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    House of Wax is not a good movie but it is an efficient one, and will deliver most of what anyone attending House of Wax could reasonably expect, assuming it would be unreasonable to expect very much.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A big, clunky movie containing some sensational sights but lacking the zest and joyous energy we expect from Steven Spielberg.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    All very nice, sometimes we smile, but there's nothing compelling.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The kind of movie where you walk in, watch the first 10 minutes, know exactly where it's going, and hope devoutly that you're wrong.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    This is a very far from perfect movie, and it ends on an unsatisfactory note.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Black somehow feels reigned in; shaved and barbered, he's lost his anarchic passion and is merely playing a comic role instead of transforming it into a personal mission.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Because the film is well-acted and written with intelligence, it might be worth seeing, despite my objections. I suspect my own feelings.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It's an overwrought Gothic melodrama that has a nice first act before it descends into shameless absurdity.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Until the plot becomes intolerably cornball, there's charm in the story.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie wants to be good-hearted but is somehow sort of grudging. It should have gone all the way. I think Fred Claus should have been meaner if he was going to be funnier, and Santa should have been up to something nefarious, instead of the jolly old ho-ho-ho routine.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    If I found it creepy beyond all reason, that is no doubt because I have been hopelessly corrupted by the decadent society I inhabit.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The actors cannot be faulted. They bring more to the story than it really deserves.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    But when you think of the "Babe" pictures, and indeed even an animated cartoon like "Home on the Range," you realize Stripes is on autopilot with all of the usual elements: a heroine missing one parent, an animal missing both, an underdog (or underzebra), cute animals, the big race.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie was more of a revue than a narrative, more about moments than an organizing purpose, and cute to the point that I yearned for some corrosive wit from its second cousin, the Monty Python universe.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie has been directed and acted so well, in fact, that almost all my questions have to do with the script: Why was the hero made so uncompromisingly hateful?
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Dear John exists only to coddle the sentiments of undemanding dreamers, and plunge us into a world where the only evil is the interruption of the good.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is fun until they set sail.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie itself is genial and unfocused and tired.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Lacking a smarter screenplay, it milks the genuine skills of its actors and director for more than it deserves, and then runs off the rails in an ending more laughable than scary.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Benshis were the Japanese performers who stood next to the screen during silent films and explained the plot to the audience. If ever a benshi were needed in a modern movie, Night Watch is that film.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Entertaining if you understand exactly what it is: if you see it as a film made by friends out of the materials presented by their lives and with the freedom to not push too hard.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    City Slickers II, subtitled The Legend of Curly's Gold, makes the mistake of thinking we care more about the gold than about the city slickers. Like too many sequels, it has forgotten what the first film was really about. Slickers II is about the MacGuffin instead of the characters.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It employs depression as a substitute for personality, and believes that if the characters are bitter and morose enough, we won't notice how dull they are.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    This movie doesn't contain "offensive language." The offensive language contains the movie.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Here is a movie so concerned with in-jokes and updates for Trekkers that it can barely tear itself away long enough to tell a story. From the weight and attention given to the transfer of command on the Starship Enterprise, you'd think a millennium was ending - which is, by the end of the film, how it feels.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Any Which Way You Can is not a very good movie, but it's hard not to feel a grudging affection for it. Where else, in the space of 115 minutes, can you find a country & western road picture with two fights, a bald motorcycle gang, the Mafia, a love story, a pickup truck, a tow truck, Fats Domino, a foul-mouthed octogenarian, an oversexed orangutan and a contest for the bare knuckle championship of the world?
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There is a place for whimsy and magic realism, and that place may not be on a cow farm in New Zealand.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Burlesque shows Cher and Christina Aguilera being all that they can be, and that's more than enough.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Ten
    The shame is that more accessible Iranian directors are being neglected in the overpraise of Kiarostami.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    When bodies are buried in cellars and cats are thrown into lighted ovens, the film reveals itself as unworthy of its subject matter.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie contains violence and death, but not really very much. For most of its languorous running time, it listens to conversations between Bella and Edward, Bella and David, Edward and David, and Edward and Bella and David. This would play better if any of them were clever conversationalists, but their ideas are limited to simplistic renderings of their desires.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie's pleasures are scant, apart from its observance of Gene Siskel's Rule of Swimming Pool Adjacency, which states that when well-dressed people are near a swimming pool, they will - yeah, you got it.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Perhaps it is not supposed to be clear; perhaps the movie's air of confusion is part of its paranoid vision. There are individual moments that create sharp images (shock troops drilling through a ceiling, De Niro wrestling with the almost obscene wiring and tubing inside a wall, the movie's obsession with bizarre duct work), but there seems to be no sure hand at the controls.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The surprise for me is Christina Ricci, who I think of as undernourished and nervous, but who flowers here in warm ripeness.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A conventional film for an unconventional actor.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It's hard to figure who the movie is intended for. In shape and purpose, it's like a G-rated version of "This Is Spinal Tap," but will its wee target audience understand the joke?
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I confess I felt involved in Unknown until it pulled one too many rabbits out of its hat. At some point, a thriller has to play fair.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The adults at the Hotchkiss reunion are played by an assortment of splendid actors.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    This is the kind of movie that ends up playing on the TV set over the bar in a better movie.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie lacks a port of entry for young viewers -- a character they can identify with. All of the major characters are adults with adult problems like debt, romance, and running (or swimming away from) the mob.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A Sound of Thunder may not be a success, but it loves its audience and wants us to have a great time.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Not the worst of the countless recent movies about good kids and hidebound, authoritatian older people. It may, however, be the most shameless in its attempt to pander to an adolescent audience.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    By the ending of the film, which is unconvincingly neat, I was distracted by too many questions to care about the answers.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Seemed kind of stuffy.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    America's Sweethearts recycles "Singin' in the Rain" but lacks the sassy genius of that 1952 musical, which is still the best comedy ever made about Hollywood.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Far and Away is a movie that joins astonishing visual splendor with a story so simple-minded it seems intended for adolescents.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is rated R, but it's the most watery R I've seen. It's more of a PG-13 playing dress-up.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    National Treasure is so silly that the Monty Python version could use the same screenplay, line for line.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    If the movie is not original, at least it's a showcase for the actors and writers. It does not speak as well, alas, for director Jordan Melamed and his cinematographer, Nick Hay.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It's a shaggy ghost story, an exercise in style, a film made with a certain breezy contempt for audiences.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The Higgins performance owes more than a little to Fred Willard's unforgettable dog show commentary in "Best in Show," but it was clear that Willard was part of a telecast.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is simply not clear about where it wants to go and what it wants to do. It is heavy on episode and light on insight, and although it takes courage to bring up touchy topics it would have taken more to treat them frankly.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is a mess: a gassy costume epic with nobody at the center.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Both the lottery scene and the anti-union material seem to be fictionalized versions of material in the powerful documentary "Waiting for Superman," which covered similar material with infinitely greater depth.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A dim-witted but visually intriguing movie.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There are so many different characters and story lines in the movie that it's hard to keep everything straight, and harder still to care.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The more I think about Simon Magus, the less I'm sure what it's trying to say.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy is so low-key, so sweet and offhand and slight, there are times when it hardly even seems happy to be a movie.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A technically proficient horror movie and well acted.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The film is bold and passionate, but not subtle, and that is its downfall.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A family movie that some will find wholesome and heartwarming and others will find cornball and tiresome. You know who you are. I know who I am. This is not my kind of movie.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I guess there's an audience for it, and Ice Cube has paid dues in better and more positive movies ("Barbershop" among them). But surely laughs can be found in something other than this worked-over material.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is pretty cornball. Little kids would probably enjoy it, but their older brothers and sisters will be rolling their eyes, and their parents will be using their iPods.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The plot is easily summarized: "Dumb and Dumber Meet Dumbbell."
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Unfortunately, I was also convinced that trapped within this 98-minute film is a good 30-minute news report struggling to get out. Shearer, who is bright and funny, comes across here as a solemn lecturer.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    We're left with a promising idea for a comedy, which arrives at some laughs but never finds its destination.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The plot becomes a juggling act just when it should be a sprint. And there's another problem: Is it intended as a comedy, or not?
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The Warriors is a real peculiarity, a movie about street gang warfare, written and directed as an exercise in mannerism. There's hardly a moment when we believe that the movie's gangs are real or that their members are real people or that they inhabit a real city. That's where the peculiarity comes in: I don't think we're supposed to. No matter what impression the ads give, this isn't even remotely intended as an action film. It's a set piece. It's a ballet of stylized male violence.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    But, lord, the characters are tireless in their peculiarities; it's as if the movie took the most colorful folks in Lake Wobegon, dehydrated them, concentrated the granules, shipped them to Newfoundland, reconstituted them with Molson's and issued them Canadian passports.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Peter Sellers was a genius who somehow made Inspector Clouseau seem as if he really were helplessly incapable of functioning in the real world and somehow incapable of knowing that. Steve Martin is a genius, too, but not at being Clouseau. It seems more like an exercise.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A film that little kids might find perfectly acceptable. Little, little, little kids. My best guess is, above fourth-grade level, you'd be pushing it.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I have never seen anything remotely approaching the mess that the new punk version of "Romeo & Juliet" makes of Shakespeare's tragedy.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    You know I am a fan of Nic Cage and Ron Perlman. Here, like cows, they devour the scenery, regurgitate it to a second stomach found only in actors and chew it as cud. It is a noble effort, but I prefer them in their straight-through Human Centipede mode.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Too much self-pity.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Stick It uses the story of a gymnast's comeback attempt as a backdrop for overwrought visual effects, music videos, sitcom dialogue and general pandering. The movie seems to fear that if it pauses long enough to actually be about gymnastics, the audience will grow restless.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Like many other cultural experiments (minimalist art, "Finnegan's Wake," the Chicago Tribune's new Friday section), it is more amusing to talk about than to experience.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    People may go to see Eddie Murphy once, twice, three or even six times in disposable movies like Harlem Nights, but if he wants to realize his potential he needs to work with a better writer and director than himself.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The whole movie is so solemn, so worshipful toward its theme, that it's finally just silly.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It is always a problem in a love story when the rival seems more interesting than the hero, and that's what happens here.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It's a thriller, a bad thriller, completely lacking in psychological or emotional truth.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Since the scenes where they're together are so much less convincing than the ones where they fall apart, watching the movie is like being on a double-date from hell.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There are laughs, to be sure, and some gleeful supporting performances, but after a promising start the movie sinks in a bog of sentiment.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The performances are strong, although undermined a little by Anselmo's peculiar style of dialogue, which sometimes sounds more like experimental poetry or song lyrics than like speech.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is only 84 minutes long, including credit cookies, but that is quite long enough. All the same, it's fitfully amusing and I have the sense that Spanish-speaking audiences will like it more than I did, although whether they'll be laughing with it or at it, I cannot say.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Strongly told stories have a way of carrying their characters along with them. But here we have an undefined character in an aimless story. Too bad.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The script must have been a funny read. It's the movie that somehow never achieves takeoff speed.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Did I care if Largo Winch won his struggle for control of Winch International? Not at all. Did I care about him? No, because all of his action and dialogue were shunted into narrow corridors of movie formulas.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The film is competently made, and the attractive cast emotes and screams energetically.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    My problem was that I didn't care who killed Mona Dearly, or why, and didn't want to know anyone in town except for Chief Rash and his daughter.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    That it works as well as it does is because the stars, Damon Wayans and Adam Sandler, have an easy rapport and some good one-liners, and the film is short and manic.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The most astonishing thing in the movie, however, is how boring it is.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Has slick production credits and performances that are quite adequate given the (narrow) opportunities of the genre.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    True crime procedurals can have a certain fascination, but not when they're jumbled glimpses of what might or might not have happened involving a lot of empty people whose main claim to fame is that they're dead.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I give the movie a negative review, and yet I don't think it's a bad movie; it's more of a misguided one, made with great creativity, but denying us what we more or less deserve from a Batman story.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Repo Men makes sci-fi's strongest possible case for universal health care.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It follows the well-worn pathways of countless police dramas before it.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    To spend 82 minutes watching Not Another Teen Movie would be a reckless waste of your time, no matter how many decades you may have to burn.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    From beginning to end, we've been there, seen that.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I can't recommend the movie, except to younger viewers, but I don't dislike it. It's "Coach Carter" Lite, and it does what it does.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    One wonders how In the Mouth of Madness might have turned out if the script had contained even a little more wit and ambition.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The film's failure is to get from A to B. We buy both good Sam and bad Sam, but we don't see him making the transition.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There are moments of sudden truth in the film; Freundlich, who also made "The Myth of Fingerprints" (1997), about an almost heroically depressed family at Thanksgiving, can create and write characters, even if he doesn't always know where to take them.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Everyone in The Other Side of the Bed, alas, has the depth of a character in a TV commercial: They're all surface, clothes, hair and attitude, and the men have the obligatory three-day beards.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The beauty of Twilight Zone -- The Movie is the same as the secret of the TV series: It takes ordinary people in ordinary situations and then (can you hear Rod Serling?) zaps them with "next stop -- the Twilight Zone!"
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    They might have been able to make a nice little thriller out of Antitrust if they'd kept one eye on the Goofy Meter.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Steven Spielberg, a gifted filmmaker, should have reimagined the material, should have seen it through the eyes of someone looking at dinosaurs, rather than through the eyes of someone looking at a box-office sequel.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The actors are splendid, especially Sarah Polley and Sean Penn, but we never feel confident that these two plots fit together, belong together, or work together.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Not a successful movie--it's too stilted and pre-programmed to come alive--but in the center of it McDormand occupies a place for her character and makes that place into a brilliant movie of its own.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It must be said that this movie is sweet and innocent, and that at a certain level it might appeal to younger kids. I doubt if its ambitions reach much beyond that.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Seems conventional in its ideas about where it can go and what it can accomplish. You don't get the idea anyone laughed out loud while writing the screenplay. It lacks a strange light in its eyes. It is too easily satisfied.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Individual moments and lines and events in I Heart Huckabees are funny in and of themselves. Viewers may be mystified but will occasionally be amused. It took boundless optimism and energy for Russell to make the film, but it reminds me of the Buster Keaton short where he builds a boat but doesn't know how to get it out of the basement.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    This question, which will instinctively occur to many viewers, is never quite dealt with in the film. The photographers sometimes drive into the middle of violent situations, hold up a camera, and say "press!" - as if that will solve everything.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It's sweet when it should be raunchy, or vice versa, and the result is a movie that seems uneasy with itself.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is mostly about our nasty heroes being attacked by terrifying antagonists in incomprehensible muddles of lightning-fast special effects. It lacks the quiet suspense of the first “Predator,” and please don't even mention the “Alien vs. Predator” pictures, which lacked the subtlety of “Mothra vs. Godzilla.”
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The word preposterous is too moderate to describe Eagle Eye. This film contains not a single plausible moment after the opening sequence, and that's borderline. It's not an assault on intelligence. It's an assault on consciousness.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie sidesteps the existence of the Greek gods, turns its heroes into action movie cliches and demonstrates that we're getting tired of computer-generated armies.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There are forces here you couldn't possibly comprehend...You can say that again.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The climactic events are shameless, contrived, and wildly out of tune with the rest of the story. To saddle Costner, Penn and Newman with such goofy melodrama is like hiring Fred Astaire and strapping a tractor on his back.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie's strategic error is to set the deadline too far in the future. There is something annoying about a comedy where a guy is strapped to a bomb and nevertheless has time to spare for off-topic shouting matches with his best buddy. A buddy comedy loses some of its charm in a situation like that.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Slight and sometimes wearisome.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The skill of the actors, who invest their characters with small touches of humanity, is useful in distracting us from the emotional manipulations, but it's like they're brightening separate rooms of a haunted house.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Lots of sight gags and one-liners are attempted, but few of them succeed. The cast is talented but stranded in weak material.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Each scene works within itself on its own terms. But there is no whole here. I've rarely seen a narrative film that seemed so reluctant to flow. Nor perhaps one with a more accurate title.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    As preposterous as the plot was, there was never a line of Hackman dialogue that didn't sound as if he believed it. The same can't be said, alas, for Sharon Stone, who apparently believed that if she played her character as silent, still, impassive and mysterious, we would find that interesting. More swagger might have helped.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Give Shadyac credit: He sells his Pasadena mansion, starts teaching college and moves into a mobile home (in Malibu, it's true). Now he offers us this hopeful if somewhat undigested cut of his findings, in a film as watchable as a really good TV commercial, and just as deep.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There is a curious problem with Birthday Girl, hard to put your finger on: The movie is kind of sour. It wants to be funny and a little nasty, it wants to surprise us and then console us, but what it mostly does is make us restless.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is unconvincing. At the end, Jim is seen going in through a "stage door," and then we hear him telling the story of his descent and recovery. We can't tell if this is supposed to be genuine testimony or a performance. That's the problem with the whole movie.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    All of the materials are in place for a film that might have pleased Orwell. But somehow they never come together.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    They (fans) know what they enjoy. They don't want no damn movies with damn surprises. I am always pleased when moviegoers have a good time; perhaps they will return to a theater and someday see a good movie by accident, and it will start them thinking.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Beloved evokes some of the fine moments in the careers of Deneuve and Marcello Mastroianni, but it doesn't re-create them.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie's problem is that it loads the casting in a way that tilts the movie in the direction of a Harlequin romance.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A mushy and limp musical fantasy, so insubstantial it keeps evaporating before our eyes. It's one of those rare movies in which every scene seems to be the final scene; it's all ends and no beginnings, right up to its actual end, which is a cheat.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    An ordinary film with ordinary characters in a story too big for it. Life has been reduced to a Lifetime movie.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    So determined to be clever and whimsical that it neglects to be anything else.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    My problem with Borstal Boy isn't so much with the facts as with the tone.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Watching this film was a cheerless exercise for me. The characters are manic and idiotic, the dialogue is rat-a-tat chatter, the action is entirely at the service of the 3-D, and the movie depends on bright colors, lots of noise and a few songs in between the whiplash moments.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    In its mastery of its moments, Jackpot has charm, humor and poignancy. What it lacks is necessity. There's a sense in which we're always waiting for it to kick in.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It looks great, it hurtles through its paces and is well-acted. The soundtrack is like elevator music if the elevator were in a death plunge. The special effects are state of the art. Its only flaw is that it's disgusting.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There's a way to make a movie like The Tourist, but Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck doesn't find that way.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It wants to be a movie in search of a truth, but it's more like a movie in search of itself.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The picture is haunted by a story problem: It isn't about anything but itself. There's no sense of life going on in the corners of the frame.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A Burning Hot Summer failed to persuade me of any reason for its existence.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is awfully sweet. The young actresses playing eighth-graders look their age, for once, and have an unstudied charm.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is that it's all surface and no substance. Not even the slightest attempt is made to suggest that the film takes its own story seriously. Everything is style. The performances seem deliberately angled as satire.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I hasten to say this is not criticism of John Travolta. He succeeds in this movie by essentially acting in a movie of his own.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Overcrowded and overwritten, with too many shrill denunciations and dramatic surprises; we don't like the characters and, worse, they don't interest us.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It makes little sense, fails as often as it succeeds, and yet is not hateful and is sometimes quite cheerfully original.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is probably ideal for those proverbial young girls who adore cats, and young boys, too. I can't recommend it for adults attending on their own, unless they really, really love cats.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    He can take a licking and keep on slicing. In the latest Halloween movie, he absorbs a blow from an ax, several knife slashes, a rock pounded on the skull, a fall down a steep hillside and being crushed against a tree by a truck. Whatever he's got, mankind needs it.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    [Garai and Luna] must be given credit for their presence and charisma in Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights, and together with the film's general ambiance, they do a lot to make amends for the lockstep plot.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The basic idea of Uncommon Valor is so interesting that it's all they can do to make a routine formula movie out of it. But they do.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I believe it is as cruel and senseless as the killings in "Elephant," but while that film was chillingly objective, this one seems to be on everybody's side. It's a moral muddle.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A turgid melodrama with the emotional range of a sympathy card.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Compared with the sensational stunts and special effects in the Bond series, The Saint seems positively leisurely. The fight scenes go on too long and are not interesting, the villains aren't single-minded enough, and the Saint seems more like a disguise fetishist than a formidable international operative.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It's not that I don't like it. It's that I don't care.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A step or two down from the first and second, but it has some very funny moments, and maybe that is all we hope for.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    An ungainly fit of three stories that have no business being shoehorned into the same movie.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It fails to make us care, even a little, about the characters and what happens to them. There is nothing at stake.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Possibly the funniest movie ever made about Catholicism. It confuses the phenomenon of stigmata with satanic possession.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Saw
    An efficiently made thriller, cheerfully gruesome, and finally not quite worth the ordeal it puts us through.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The story of Black Rain is thin and prefabricated and doesn't stand up to much scrutiny, so Scott distracts us with overwrought visuals.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There is undoubtedly a movie to be made about this material -- a different movie.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie itself isn't as interesting as the conversations you can have about it. It duplicates Thomas' miserable world so well we want to escape it as urgently as Thomas does.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Essentially just a promotional film for Jordan as a product. It plays like a commercial for itself.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie has terrific if completely unbelievable special effects. The actors had fun, I guess. You might, too, if you like goofiness like this.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It has been written by people who want to prepare kids for the worst.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    When the hero, his alter ego, his girlfriend and the villain all seem to lack any joy in being themselves, why should we feel joy at watching them?
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Educating Rita, which might have been a charming human comedy, disintegrated into a forced march through a formula relationship.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Sweet, in its meandering way. It has no meanness in it, no cynicism, no desire to be anything other than what it is, an evocation of the fun of living your life as a skateboarder.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Then they annoy us by trying to deny the attraction while the plot spins its wheels, pretending to be about something.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The first 30 minutes of the movie gave me lots of room for hope. It was fast-moving, it was visually spectacular, it was exotic and lighthearted and filled with a spirit of adventure. But then, gradually, the movie began to recycle itself. It began to feel as if I was seeing the same thing more than once.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    This is the kind of film that isn't as much fun to see as it is to hear about.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    When the suffering of real children is used to enhance the image of movie stars who fall in love against the backdrop of their suffering, a certain decency is lacking. Beyond Borders wants it both ways -- glamor up front, and human misery in the background to lend it poignancy.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Battle looks like the last gap of a dying series, a movie made simply to wring the dollars out of any remaining ape fans.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is a first-time directorial effort by Justin Theroux, a splendid actor, son of the writer Phyllis, nephew of the novelist Paul. He might have done better to have taken on something by them.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Jennifer Garner is indeed a charmer, but she's the victim of a charmless treatment in 13 Going on 30.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    This is Spielberg's weakest film since "1941."
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    My two-star rating represents a compromise between admiration and horror.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Too clever by half. It's the worst kind of con: It tells us it's a con, so we don't even have the consolation of being led down the garden path.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Rocky IV is movie-making by the numbers. Even the climactic fight scene isn't as exciting as it should be, maybe because we know with a certainty born of long experience how it will turn out.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I guess it's a tribute to The Man With Two Brains that I found myself laughing a fair amount of the time, despite my feelings about Martin.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Everything is brought together at the end in a flash of revelation that is spectacularly underwhelming.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Carny is bursting with more information about American carnivals that it can contain, surrounding a plot too thin to support it. Without knowing much about the reasons why the movie was made, I'd guess on the evidence that the director, Robert Kaylor, was fascinated by carnivals, spent a lot of time with one and shot a lot of film, and then found himself forced, to shape his material into some sort of traditional, commercial story. Inside this movie is a documentary struggling to get out.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Here's a case of two actors who do everything humanly possible to create characters who are sweet and believable, and are defeated by a screenplay that forces them into bizarre, implausible behavior.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    This movie wasn't made for me. It was made for the people who will love it, of which there may be a multitude. The stage musical has sold 30 million tickets, and I feel like the grouch at the party.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Walking out of the screening, I was thinking: Elizabeth Hurley for girlfriend, Courtney Love for Satan.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The Mothman is singularly ineffective as a threat because it is only vaguely glimpsed, has no nature we can understand, doesn't operate under rules that the story can focus on, and seems to be involved in space-time shifts far beyond its presumed focus. There is also the problem that insects make unsatisfactory villains unless they are very big.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    For the most part, Halloween II is a retread of “Halloween” without that movie's craft, exquisite timing, and thorough understanding of horror.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The fight scenes in Bulletproof Monk are not as inventive as some I've seen (although the opening fight on a rope bridge is so well done that it raises expectations it cannot fulfill).
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The kind of dread dark horror film where you better hope nobody in the audience snickers, because the film teeters right on the edge of the ridiculous.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    An intriguing plot is established, a new character is brought on with a complex set of problems, and then all the groundwork disintegrates into the usual hash of preposterous action sequences.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Although Catherine Hardwicke, the director of Lords of Dogtown, has a good sense for the period and does what she can with her actors, we've seen the originals, and these aren't the originals.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    So the movie is daring, and well-acted. Yet it isn't very satisfying, because the serious content keeps breaking through the soggy plot intended to contain it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Mars Attacks! has the look and feel of a schlocky 1950s science-fiction movie, and if it's not as bad as a Wood film, that's not a plus: A movie like this should be a lot better, or a lot worse.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I'm all for movies that create unease, but I prefer them to appear to know why they're doing that. Super is a film ending in narrative anarchy, exercising a destructive impulse to no greater purpose than to mess with us.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There's nothing much wrong with the film; my complaint is that there's nothing much right about it.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Reeves has many arrows in his quiver, but screwball comedy isn't one of them.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie has a certain mordant humor, and some macho dialogue that's funny. Woods manfully keeps a straight face through goofy situations where many another actor would have signaled us with a wink. But the movie is not scary, and the plot is just one gory showdown after another.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Tells a pointlessly convoluted version of a love story that would really be very simple, if anyone in the movie possessed common sense.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    As an achievement, Computer Chess is laudable. As a film, it's missable.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    In this film there is a scene where something is said in English pronounced with one accent, and a character asks, ''What did he say?'' and he is told -- in English pronounced with another accent.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A high-tech and well made violent action picture using the name of Robin Hood for no better reason than that it’s an established brand not protected by copyright.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is too impressed with its own solemn insights to work up much entertainment value; is too much fable to be convincing as life.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    As a movie, it knows little about men, women or television shows, but has studied movie formulas so carefully that we can see each new twist and turn as it creeps ever so slowly into view.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There are small moments of real humor.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Assembled from the debris of countless worn-out images of the Deep South and is indeed beautifully photographed. But the writer-director, Deborah Kampmeier, has become inflamed by the imagery and trusts it as the material for a story, which seems grotesque and lurid.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It proceeds so deliberately from one plot point to the next that we want to stand next to the camera, holding up cards upon which we have lettered clues and suggestions.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    In the end, I'm conflicted about the film. As an accessible family film, it delivers the goods. But it lives in the shadow of "March of the Penguins." Despite its sad scenes, it sentimentalizes.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It's one of those off-balance movies that seems searching for the right tone.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is all the more artificial because it has been made with great, almost painful, earnestness.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Amusing enough to watch and passes the time, but it's the kind of movie you're content to wait for on your friendly indie cable channel.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The sex in the movie is so mild that I assumed the R rating was generated primarily by the gay theme, until I learned the R is in fact because of too many f-words.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Of the two co-stars, what I can say is that I’m looking forward to their next films.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The result is a tiresome exercise that circles at great length through various prefabricated stories defined by the advice each couple needs (or doesn't need).
    • 15 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It's a muddled, sometimes-atmospheric effort.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Chop off the last two or three minutes, fade to black, and you have a decent film.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    By the end of the movie, I frankly didn't give a damn. There's an ironic twist, but the movie hadn't paid for it and didn't deserve it. And I was struck by the complete lack of morality in Demonlover.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    So the screenplay is a soap operatic mess, involving distractions, loose ends, and sheer carelessness.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    What's lacking is a little more depth. This is a movie that covers a lot of distance in only 87 minutes.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A brave and ambitious but chaotic attempt at political satire.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I will say that the attempt to reinterpret the memorable closing shot of "Blood Simple" is so gauche and graceless that I involuntarily moaned in disgust. I docked the film another half-star just for that.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Not very funny, and maybe couldn't have been very funny no matter what, because the pieces for comedy are not in place.

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