For 4,430 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 74% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 24% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 The English Patient
Lowest review score: 0 Freddy Got Fingered
Score distribution:
4430 movie reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This film is true about human nature. It is not universal, but within its particular focus, it is unrelenting.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A great film, an intelligent film, a film shot clearly so that we know exactly who everybody is and where they are and what they’re doing and why.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The movie is uncommonly absorbing.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It "explains" nothing but feels everything. It reminds me of two other films: Bresson's "Mouchette," about a poor girl victimized by a village, and Karen Gehre's "Begging Naked," shown at Ebertfest this year, about a woman whose art is prized even as she lives in Central Park.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    If you have never seen a single film by Agnes Varda, perhaps it is best to start with The Beaches of Agnes.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    As Soderbergh lovingly peels away veil after veil of deception, the film develops into an unexpected human comedy. Not that any of the characters are laughing.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    There is a word to describe Ponyo, and that word is magical. This poetic, visually breathtaking work by the greatest of all animators has such deep charm that adults and children will both be touched.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A big, bold, audacious war movie that will annoy some, startle others and demonstrate once again that he’s (Tarantino) the real thing, a director of quixotic delights.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A great American film.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    There are many documentaries angry about the human destruction of the planetary peace. This is one of the very best -- a certain Oscar nominee.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    I can't single out a performance. This is a superb ensemble, conveying hat joy actors feel when hey know they're good in good material. This is not a traditional feature, but it's one of Spike Lee's best films.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Painful family issues are more likely to stay beneath the surface, known to everyone but not spoken of. Still Walking, a magnificent new film from Japan, is very wise about that, and very true.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Once again, [Cameron] has silenced the doubters by simply delivering an extraordinary film. There is still at least one man in Hollywood who knows how to spend $250 million, or was it $300 million, wisely.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Have I mentioned A Serious Man is so rich and funny? This isn't a laugh-laugh movie, but a wince-wince movie. Those can be funny too.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is a remarkable film about a strange and prophetic man. What does it tell us? Did living a virtual life destroy him?
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    You can live in a movie like this.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is such a rare movie. Its characters are uncompromisingly themselves, flawed, stubborn, vulnerable.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Up in the Air takes the trust people once had in their jobs and pulls out the rug. It is a film for this time.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This happens in 1961, when 16-year-old girls were a great deal less knowing than they are now. Yet the movie isn't shabby or painful, but romantic and wonderfully entertaining.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This great film by Anthony Fabian tells this story through the eyes of a happy girl who grows into an outsider.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Trucker sets out on a difficult and tricky path, and doesn't put a foot wrong.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    [An] extraordinary documentary, nothing at all like what I was expecting to see. Here is not a sick and drugged man forcing himself through grueling rehearsals, but a spirit embodied by music. Michael Jackson was something else.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    An exhilarating visual experience and proves for the third time he's (Zemeck) is one of the few directors who knows what he's doing with 3-D.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    I don't know when I've seen a thriller more frightening. I couldn't tear my eyes from the screen. Collapse is even entertaining, in a macabre sense. I think you owe it to yourself to see it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    No one is better at this kind of performance than Nicolas Cage. He's a fearless actor. He doesn't care if you think he goes over the top. If a film calls for it, he will crawl to the top hand over hand with bleeding fingernails.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A voluptuary of a film, drunk on primary colors, caressing Penelope Cruz, using the devices of a Hitchcock to distract us with surfaces while the sinister uncoils beneath. As it ravished me, I longed for a freeze frame to allow me to savor a shot.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is a thriller, not a documentary. It's my belief that the nature of the neocon evildoing has by now become pretty clear. Others will disagree. The bottom line is: This is one hell of a thriller.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The impersonation of Welles by Christian McKay in Me and Orson Welles is the centerpiece of the film, and from it, all else flows. We can almost accept that this is the Great Man.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Jeff Bridges is a virtual certainty to win his first Oscar, after four nominations.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The film is visually masterful. It's in black and white, of course.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Arnold deserves comparison with a British master director like Ken Loach.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is astonishingly original.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Red Riding Trilogy is an immersive experience like "The Best of Youth," "Brideshead Revisited" or "Nicholas Nickleby."
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This movie is the work of a man who knows how to direct a thriller. Smooth, calm, confident, it builds suspense instead of depending on shock and action.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The best performance in the film is by Arestrup as Cesar. You may remember him from Audiard's "The Beat That My Heart Skipped" (2005), where he played a seedy but confident father who psychically overshadows his son.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A compelling thriller to begin with, but it adds the rare quality of having a heroine more fascinating than the story.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Some kind of sweet, wacky masterpiece.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Juan Jose Campanella is the writer-director, and here is a man who creates a complete, engrossing, lovingly crafted film. He is filled with his stories. The Secret in Their Eyes is a rebuke to formula screenplays. We grow to know the characters, and the story pays due respect to their complexities and needs.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The movie heroes who affect me most are not extroverted. They don't strut, speechify and lead armies. They have no superpowers. They are ordinary people who are faced with a need and rise to the occasion. Ree Dolly is such a hero.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    An amazing film. It is deep, rich, human. It is not about rich and poor, but about old and new. It is about the ancient war between tradition and feeling.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The first shot tells us 45365 is the zip code of the town." In this achingly beautiful film, that zip code belongs to Sidney, Ohio, a handsome town of about 20,000 residents.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    We laugh, that we may not cry. But none of this philosophy comes close to the insane logic of "M*A*S*H," which is achieved through a peculiar marriage of cinematography, acting, directing, and writing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It's gloriously absurd. This movie has holes in it big enough to drive the whole movie through. The laws of physics seem to be suspended here the same way as in a Road Runner cartoon.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Inception does a difficult thing. It is wholly original, cut from new cloth, and yet structured with action movie basics so it feels like it makes more sense than (quite possibly) it does.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    There is the sense they're fighting for each other more than for ideology.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Here is a gripping film with the focus of a Japanese drama, an impenetrable character to equal Alain Delon's in "Le Samourai," by Jean-Pierre Melville.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is a good movie, from a masterful novel.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    David Fincher's film has the rare quality of being not only as smart as its brilliant hero, but in the same way. It is cocksure, impatient, cold, exciting and instinctively perceptive.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is a great film about greatness, the story of the horse and the no less brave woman who had faith in him.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It's one of those extraordinary films, like "Hoop Dreams," that tells a story the makers could not possibly have anticipated in advance. It works like stunning, grieving fiction.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    One of the most fascinating aspects of Inside Job involves the chatty on-camera insights of Kristin Davis, a Wall Street madam, who says the Street operated in a climate of abundant sex and cocaine for valued clients and the traders themselves.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is a film for intelligent people who are naturally curious about what happens when the shutters close.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Is the film watchable? Yes, compulsively.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What we have here is a superior historical drama and a powerful personal one.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Coppola is a fascinating director. She sees, and we see exactly what she sees. There is little attempt here to observe a plot. All the attention is on the handful of characters, on Johnny.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Leigh's Another Year is like a long, purifying soak in empathy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    However much it conceals the real-life events that inspired it, it lives and breathes on its own, and as an extension of the mysterious whimsy of Tati.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is told from and by an adult sensibility that understands loneliness, gratitude and the intense curiosity we feel for other lives, man and beast.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Haggis writes with such directness and such a good ear for everyday speech that the characters seem real and plausible after only a few words. His cast is uniformly strong; the actors sidestep cliches and make their characters particular.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Rango is some kind of a miracle: An animated comedy for smart moviegoers, wonderfully made, great to look at, wickedly satirical, and (gasp!) filmed in glorious 2-D.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    David Schwimmer has made one of the year's best films: Powerfully emotional, yes, but also very perceptive.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Putty Hill makes no statement. It looks. It looks with as much perception and sympathy as it is possible for a film to look. It is surprisingly effective.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Here is a good and joyous man who leads a life that is perfect for him, and how many people do we meet like that? This movie made me happy every moment I was watching it.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The only other film I've seen with this boldness of vision is Kubrick's "2001: A Space Odyssey," and it lacked Malick's fierce evocation of human feeling.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is a spellbinding enigma, and one of the damnedest films Morris has ever made.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Movies about high school misfits are common; this is an uncommon one. Terri, so convincingly played by Jacob Wysocki, is smart, gentle and instinctively wise.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The Interrupters is based on a much-acclaimed article in the New York Times Magazine by Alex Kotlowitz, who followed a period of intense violence in Chicago. He joined with James to co-produce the film. It is difficult to imagine the effort, day after day for a year, of following this laborious, heroic and so often fruitless volunteer work.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The film's ending is improbably upbeat: Magic realism, in a sense. It works as a deliverance. Dennis Foon's screenplay is based on the novel "Chanda's Secrets" by Canadian writer Allan Stratton. It is a parable with Biblical undertones, recalling "Cry, the Beloved Country."
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A smart, intense and moving film that isn't so much about sports as about the war between intuition and statistics. I walked in knowing what the movie was about, but unprepared for its intelligence and depth.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The film concludes not with a "surprise ending" but with a series of shots that brilliantly summarize all that has gone before. This is masterful filmmaking.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Here is a film of great beauty and attention, and watching it is a form of meditation. Sometimes films take a great stride outside the narrow space of narrative tradition and present us with things to think about. Here mostly what I thought was, why must man sometimes be so cruel?
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This movie is as lovable as a silent comedy, which it could have been.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Into the Abyss may be the saddest film Werner Herzog has ever made. It regards a group of miserable lives, and in finding a few faint glimmers of hope only underlines the sadness.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What happens is that we get vested in the lives of these characters. That's rare in a lot of movies.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The way Hugo deals with Melies is enchanting in itself, but the film's first half is devoted to the escapades of its young hero. In the way the film uses CGI and other techniques to create the train station and the city, the movie is breathtaking.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is a great act of filmmaking and acting. I don't believe I would be able to see it twice.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This profound and immensely touching film in only 75 perfect minutes achieves the profundity of an epic.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Here is one of the most entertaining films in many a moon, a film that charms because of its story, its performances and because of the sly way it plays with being silent and black and white.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The actors, as sometimes happens, create those miracles that can endow a film with conviction. Moadi and Hatami, as husband and wife, succeed in convincing us their characters are acting from genuine motives.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    As a portrait of a deteriorating state of mind, We Need to Talk About Kevin is a masterful film.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    After seeing Kinyarwanda, I have a different kind of feeling about the genocide that took place in Rwanda in 1994. The film approaches it not as a story line but as a series of intense personal moments.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Harrelson is an ideal actor for the role. Especially in tensely wound-up movies like this, he implies that he's looking at everything and then watching himself looking.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It's one of the smartest and most merciless comedies to come along in a while. It centers on an area of fairly narrow interest, but in its study of human nature, it is deep and takes no prisoners.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What a courageous first feature this is, a film that sidesteps shopworn stereotypes and tells a quiet, firm, deeply humanist story about doing the right thing. It is a film that avoids any message or statement and simply shows us, with infinite sympathy, how the life of a completely original character can help us lead our own.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A magnificent science-fiction film, all the more intriguing because it raises questions about the origin of human life and doesn't have the answers.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This film is joyous, but more than that: It's lovely in its construction. The director, Prashant Bhargava, born and raised on Chicago's South Side, knows what his basic story line is, but reveals it subtly.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The film is astonishing in its visual beauty; cinematographer Greig Fraser ("Snow White and the Huntsman") finds nobility in this arduous journey.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Sometime miraculous films come into being, made by people you've never heard of, starring unknown faces, blindsiding you with creative genius. Beasts of the Southern Wild is one of the year's best films.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The information they eventually dislodge about Rodriguez suggests a secular saint, a deeply good man, whose music is the expression of a blessed inner being. I hope you're able to see this film. You deserve to. And yes, it exists because we need for it to.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The movie has an emotional payoff I failed to anticipate. It expresses hope in human nature. It is one of the year's best films.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A grand, romantic life story about love, loss, regret and the sadness that can be evoked by a violin - not only through music, but through the instrument itself. It is all melancholy and loss, and delightfully comedic, with enough but not too much magic realism. The story as it stands could be the scenario for an opera.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Oslo, August 31st is quietly, profoundly, one of the most observant and sympathetic films I've seen.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is the kind of experience you simply sink into.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Hitchcock called his most familiar subject "The Innocent Man Wrongly Accused." Jarecki pumps up the pressure here by giving us a Guilty Man Accurately Accused, and that's what makes the film so ingeniously involving.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    One of the best police movies in recent years, a virtuoso fusion of performances and often startling action.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Argo the real movie about the fake movie, is both spellbinding and surprisingly funny.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It fascinates in the moment. It's getting from one moment to the next that is tricky. Surely this is one of the most ambitious films ever made.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is nearly flawless.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Rarely has a film attended more carefully to the details of politics.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Skyfall triumphantly reinvents 007 in one of the best Bonds ever. This is a full-blooded, joyous, intelligent celebration of a beloved cultural icon, with Daniel Craig taking full possession of a role he previously played unconvincingly. I don't know what I expected in Bond No. 23, but certainly not an experience this invigorating.

Top Trailers