For 4,078 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 75% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 23% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 49 Up
Lowest review score: 0 Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo
Score distribution:
4,078 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Basically what we have here is a drama, with comedy occasionally lifting the mood. The result is a surprising seriousness; this isn't the mindless romp with cute animals.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Now we have an American film with the raw power of “City of God” or “Pixote,” a film that does something unexpected, and inspired, and brave.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It's the kind of movie you know you can trust, and you give yourself over to affection for these characters who are so lovingly observed.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The movie is funny, but it's more than funny, it's exhilarating.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Not the macabre horror story the title suggests, but a sweet and visually lovely tale of love lost.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie suggests that humans benefitted little from Project Nim, and Nim himself not at all.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    I have seen love scenes in which naked bodies thrash in sweaty passion, but I have rarely seen them more passionate than in this movie, where everyone is wrapped in layers of Victorian repression.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It's a real movie, full-blooded and smart, with qualities even for those who have no idea who Stan Lee is. It's a superhero movie for people who don't go to superhero movies, and for those who do, it's the one they've been yearning for.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It is a new documentary of a past event, recapturing the electricity generated by Muhammad Ali in his prime.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    I watched the film in a sort of reverie. The dancers seemed particularly absorbed. They had performed these dances many times before, but always with Pina Bausch present. Now they were on their own, in homage.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The way Hugo deals with Melies is enchanting in itself, but the film's first half is devoted to the escapades of its young hero. In the way the film uses CGI and other techniques to create the train station and the city, the movie is breathtaking.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A documentary that is beyond strange, follows two arch-enemies in their grim, long-term rivalry, which involves way more time than any human lifetime should devote to Donkey Kong.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    In its warmth and in its enchantment, as well as in its laughs, this is the best comedy in a long time.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The details of the film and of the performances are meticulously realized; there is a reward in seeing artists working so well. But the story has no entry or exit, and is cold, sad and hopeless. Afterward, I feel more admiration than gratitude.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie finds the right tone to present its bittersweet wisdom. It's relaxed. It's content to observe and listen.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is a mystery, this business of life. I can't think of any under cinematic undertaking that allows us to realize that more deeply.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Up in the Air takes the trust people once had in their jobs and pulls out the rug. It is a film for this time.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Duvall's screenplay does what great screenwriting is supposed to do, and surprises us with additional observations and revelations in every scene.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A movie made with charm and wit, and unlike some family movies it does not condescend, not for a second.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Put the two parts together, and Tarantino has made a masterful saga that celebrates the martial arts genre while kidding it, loving it, and transcending it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The strength of Leigh's film is that it is not a message picture, but a deep and true portrait of these lives.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A perplexing and disturbing film of great effect.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This is a brave, unflinching, sometimes virtually unwatchable documentary that makes such an effective case for both pro-choice and pro-life that it is impossible to determine which side the filmmaker, Tony Kaye, stands on. All you can conclude at the end is that both sides have effective advocates, but the pro-lifers also have some alarming people on their team.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Is something being hidden? No. It's more that something doesn't want to be known.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A harrowing look at institutional cruelty, perpetrated by the Catholic Church in Ireland, and justified by a perverted hysteria about sex.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A documentary with no pretense of objectivity. Here is Mike Tyson's story in his own words, and it is surprisingly persuasive.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    What works best in the film is the over-all vision. Branagh is able to see himself as a king, and so we can see him as one.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Although The White Diamond is entire of itself, it earns its place among the other treasures and curiosities in Herzog's work. Here is one of the most inquisitive filmmakers alive, a man who will go to incredible lengths to film people living at the extremes.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The documentary shows outrageous behavior, none more so than when they and many others are directed to a nearby Navy base for refuge.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Helena Bonham Carter may be Burton's inamorata, but apart from that, she is perfectly cast, not as a vulgar fishwife type but as a petite beauty with dark, sad eyes and a pouting mouth and a persistent fantasy that she and the barber will someday settle by the seaside. Not bloody likely.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It uses a colorful vocabulary, it contains a lot of energy, it elevates its miserable heroes to the status of icons (in their own eyes, that is).
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Alexander Payne is a director whose satire is omnidirectional. He doesn't choose an easy target and march on it. He stands in the middle of his story and attacks on all directions.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    One of the qualities of Monsieur Lazhar is that it has no simple questions and simple answers. Its purpose is to present us with a situation, explore the people involved and show us a man who is dealing with his own deep hurts.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Watching this movie is like daydreaming.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The latest and one of the most harrowing films set along the religious divides in Israel.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Is the film watchable? Yes, compulsively.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Even when it's baffling, it's never boring. I've heard of airtight plots. This one is not merely airtight, but hermetically sealed.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    However much it conceals the real-life events that inspired it, it lives and breathes on its own, and as an extension of the mysterious whimsy of Tati.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Most people do not choose their religions but have them forced upon themselves by birth, and the lesson of Incendies is that an accident of birth is not a reason for hatred.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The film most of all is about Hester, who stares out the window and smokes.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This is not a political documentary. It is a crime story. No matter what your politics, Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room will make you mad.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    You would imagine a film like this would be greeted with rapture in France, but no. The leading French film magazine, "Cahiers du Cinema," has long scorned the filmmakers of this older generation as makers of mere "quality," and interprets Tavernier's work as an attack on the New Wave generation which replaced them.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Cage and Shue make these cliches into unforgettable people.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The Mexican drug cartels have inspired countless films, but never one as final as Natalia Almada's documentary El Velador.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    An astonishing film.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Like "City of God," it feels organically rooted. Like many Le Carre stories, it begins with grief and proceeds with sadness toward horror. Its closing scenes are as cynical about international politics and commerce as I can imagine. I would like to believe they are an exaggeration, but I fear they are not. This is one of the year's best films.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Ron Howard's Parenthood is a delicate balancing act between comedy and truth, a movie that contains a lot of laughter and yet is more concerned with character than punch lines.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Algenis Perez Soto plays the character so openly, so naturally, that an interesting thing happens: Baseball is only the backdrop, not the subject. This is a wonderful film.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The high-tech stuff is flawlessly done, but the intriguing elements of the movie involve the performances.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The movie is well cast from top to bottom; like many British films, it benefits from the genius of its supporting players.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    All I know is, it is better to be the whale than the squid. Whales inspire major novels.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Jacques Perrin's Oscar-nominated Winged Migration does for birds what the 1996 documentary "Microcosmos" did for insects: It looks at them intimately, very close up, in shots that seem impossible to explain.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Was and is a brilliant horror film, one with an archetypal ability to reach and disturb us. If I were showing The Exorcist to a friend, I would show the 1973 version without the slightest hesitation.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    If quirky, independent, grown-up outsider filmmakers set out to make a family movie, this is the kind of movie they would make. And they did.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    this is a very good movie. Woody Allen is ... Woody, sublimely. Diane Keaton gives us a fresh and nicely edged New York intellectual. And Mariel Hemingway deserves some kind of special award for what's in some ways the most difficult role in the film.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It has been said that all modern Russian literature came out of Gogol’s “Overcoat.” In the same way, all of us came out of the overcoat of this same immigrant experience.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Sands' death is shown in a tableaux of increasing bleakness. It is agonizing, yet filmed with a curious painterly purity.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie, based on the famous comic novel by Stella Gibbons, is dour, eccentric and very funny, and depends on the British gift for treating madness as good common sense.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What a courageous first feature this is, a film that sidesteps shopworn stereotypes and tells a quiet, firm, deeply humanist story about doing the right thing. It is a film that avoids any message or statement and simply shows us, with infinite sympathy, how the life of a completely original character can help us lead our own.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    "How many bands stay together for 30 years?" asks Slash of Guns N' Roses, in a backstage interview. "You've got the Stones, the Who, U2 -- and Anvil." Yeah. And Anvil.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is a great deal more entertaining than it sounds, in large part because the two actors are gifted mimics - Brydon the better one, although Coogan doesn't think so.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Is Prisoner of Azkaban as good as the first two films? Not quite. It doesn't have that sense of joyously leaping through a clockwork plot, and it needs to explain more than it should. But the world of Harry Potter remains delightful, amusing and sophisticated.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    I don't know what vast significance Michael Clayton has (it involves deadly pollution but isn't a message movie). But I know it is just about perfect as an exercise in the genre.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What a magical movie.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Against the overarching facts of his personal magnetism and the blind loyalty of his lieutenants, the movie observes the workings of the world within the bunker. All power flowed from Hitler. He was evil, mad, ill, but long after Hitler's war was lost he continued to wage it in fantasy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What an affecting film this is. It respects its characters and doesn't use them for its own shabby purposes. How deeply we care about them.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The young actors are powerful in draining roles. We care for them more than they care for themselves. Alfredson's palette is so drained of warm colors that even fresh blood is black.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    For me, it is too clever by half, creating full-bodied characters but inserting them into a story that is thin soup.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It's a tribute to The Celebration that the style and the story don't stumble over each other. The script is well planned, the actors are skilled at deploying their emotions, and the long day's journey into night is fraught with wounds that the farcical elements only help to keep open.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This movie does not describe the America I learned about in civics class, or think of when I pledge allegiance to the flag. Yet I know I will get the usual e-mails accusing me of partisanship, bias, only telling one side, etc. What is the other side? See this movie, and you tell me.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Perhaps I have made the movie sound too serious... So let me just say that Down and Out in Beverly Hills made me laugh longer and louder than any film I've seen in a long time.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It's one of the smartest and most merciless comedies to come along in a while. It centers on an area of fairly narrow interest, but in its study of human nature, it is deep and takes no prisoners.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Marley, an ambitious and comprehensive film, does what is probably the best possible job of documenting an important life.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The film is visually masterful. It's in black and white, of course.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    After his murder, Michele Montas goes on the air to insist that Jean Dominique is still alive, because his spirit lives on. But in this film Haiti seems to be a country that can kill the spirit, too.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Some kind of weird masterpiece...one of the best movies of the year.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The most harrowing movie about mountain climbing I have seen, or can imagine.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A friend asked: "Wouldn't you love to attend a wedding like that?" In a way, I felt I had. Yes, I began to feel absorbed in the experience. A few movies can do that, can slip you out of your mind and into theirs.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This movie is as lovable as a silent comedy, which it could have been.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This isn't a coming-of-age movie so much as a movie about being of an age.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    "Batman" isn't a comic book anymore. Christopher Nolan's The Dark Knight is a haunted film that leaps beyond its origins and becomes an engrossing tragedy. It creates characters we come to care about. That's because of the performances, because of the direction, because of the writing, and because of the superlative technical quality of the entire production.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    One of the pleasures of Get Shorty is watching the way the plot moves effortlessly from crime to the movies - not a long distance, since both industries are based on fear, greed, creativity and intimidation.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Not a simpleminded movie in which merely being ABLE to read lips saves the day. In this brilliant sequence, she reads his lips and that ALLOWS them to set into motion a risky chain of events based on the odds that the bad guys will respond predictably.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It is a Kafkaesque story, in which ominous things follow one another with a certain internal logic but make no sense at all.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie, written and directed by Lukas Moodysson, has the directness and clarity of a documentary, but allows itself touches of tenderness and grief.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    I got a little lost while watching Mysteries of Lisbon and enjoyed the experience. It's a lavish, elegant, operatic, preposterous 19th century melodrama, with characters who change names and seemingly identities, and if you could pass a quiz on its stories within stories, you have my admiration.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Sometimes two performances come along that are so perfectly matched that no overt signals are needed to show how the characters feel about each other. That's what happens between Melissa Leo and Misty Upham in Frozen River.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Drugstore Cowboy is one of the best films in the long tradition of American outlaw road movies - a tradition that includes "Bonnie and Clyde," "Easy Rider," "Midnight Cowboy" and "Badlands."
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The most important sequence in Late Marriage is a refreshingly frank sex scene involving Zaza and Judith. -- Watching this scene, we realize that most sex scenes in the movies play like auditions.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Grips the attention and is exciting and involving. I recommend it on that basis--and also because of the new information it contains.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    I have seen Waking Life three times now. I want to see it again -- not to master it, or even to remember it better, -- but simply to experience all of these ideas, all of this passion, the very act of trying to figure things out.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Seibei's story is told by director Yoji Yamada in muted tones and colors, beautifully re-creating a feudal village that still retains its architecture, its customs, its ancient values, even as the economy is making its way of life obsolete.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The movie is vulgar, raunchy, ribald, and occasionally scatological. It is also the funniest comedy since Mel Brooks made "The Producers."
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is a full-bodied silent film of the sort that might have been made by the greatest directors of the 1920s, if such details as the kinky sadomasochism of this film's evil stepmother could have been slipped past the censors.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie is a dazzling song and dance extravaganza, with just enough words to support the music and allow everyone to catch their breath between songs.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Nuri Bilge Ceylan, one of Turkey's best directors, has a deep understanding of human nature. He loves his characters and empathizes with them. They deserve better than to be shuttled around in a facile plot. They deserve empathy. So do we all.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    I was fascinated by the face of Emmanuelle Devos, and her face is specifically why I recommend the movie.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Isabelle Huppert has the best poker face since Buster Keaton. She faces the camera with detached regard, inviting us to imagine what she is thinking.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    One of the year's best films for a lot of reasons, including its ability to involve the audience almost breathlessly in a story of mounting tragedy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    To see this film's footage from the '70s is to see the beginning of much of pop and fashion iconography for the next two decades.

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