For 4,340 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 74% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 24% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Talk to Her
Lowest review score: 0 Police Academy
Score distribution:
4340 movie reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    An enormously entertaining movie, like nothing we've ever seen before, and yet completely familiar.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    (1) Shot for shot, Maddin can be as surprising and delightful as any filmmaker has ever been, and (2) he is an acquired taste, but please, sir, may I have some more?
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    To see strong acting like this is exhilarating. In a time of flashy directors who slice and dice their films in a dizzy editing rhythm, it is important to remember that films can look and listen and attentively sympathize with their characters. Directors grow great by subtracting, not adding, and Eastwood does nothing for show, everything for effect.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Oslo, August 31st is quietly, profoundly, one of the most observant and sympathetic films I've seen.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This film leads to a startling conclusion that wipes out the story's paradoxes so neatly it's as if it never happened. You have to grin at the ingenuity of Johnson's screenplay.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A film that unfolds like a court case in which all of the testimony sounds like the simple truth, and none of it agrees.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is not your average family cartoon. Shrek is jolly and wicked, filled with sly in-jokes and yet somehow possessing a heart.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie does a harrowing job of showing how, and why, a man might be made to confess to a bombing he didn't commit.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Ballast inexorably grows and deepens and gathers power and absorbs us. I always say I hardly ever cry at sad films, but I sometimes do, just a little, at films about good people.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is refreshing to see Cruz acting in the culture and language that is her own. As it did with Sophia Loren in the 1950s, Hollywood has tried to force Cruz into a series of show-biz categories, when she is obviously most at home playing a woman like the ones she knew, grew up with, could have become.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The interesting thing is that Hiller has saved the movie without substantially changing anything in the book.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Like a flowering of talent that has been waiting so long to be celebrated. It is also one of the most touching and moving of the year's films.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Power to absorb, entertain and anger.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It has been a good long while since I have felt the presence of Evil so manifestly demonstrated as in the first appearance of Anthony Hopkins in The Silence of the Lambs.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What happens is that we get vested in the lives of these characters. That's rare in a lot of movies.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A superb crime melodrama.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is Mike Leigh's funniest film since "Life Is Sweet" (1991). Of course he hasn't ever made a completely funny film, and Happy-Go-Lucky has scenes that are not funny, not at all.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    As for the movie, I've seen better comedy films and better concert films. It noodles around too much and gets distracted from the music. Michel Gondry, who directed, makes good fiction films but is not an instinctive documentarian and forgets that even a fly on the wall should occasionally find some peanut butter. As the record of a state of mind, however, the film is uncanny.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    One of the strengths of this film is that it never pauses to explain.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is a film with a political point of view, but often its characters lose sight of that, in their fascination with each other and with the girl.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    An enjoyable film, and yet it left me somehow unsatisfied...there is too much contrivance in the way [Austen] dispatches her men to London when she is done with them.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    There are many documentaries angry about the human destruction of the planetary peace. This is one of the very best -- a certain Oscar nominee.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It may be that Together only wants to remember a time. That it does with gentle, observant humor. If it has a message, it is that ideas imposed on human nature may be able to shape lives for a while, but in the long run, we drift back toward more conventional choices.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The film is poetic and erotic, creepy and melodramatic, overwrought and sometimes mocking, as if F. W. Murnau's "Nosferatu" (1922) had a long-lost musical version.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The film is terrifically entertaining, an ambitious big-budget epic, directed with great visuals and sound by Takeshi Miike.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Jeff Bridges is a virtual certainty to win his first Oscar, after four nominations.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Cuaron's version of magic realism consists of seeing incredibly fanciful sets and situations in precise detail, and Johnson has provided him with the freedom and logistical support to create such places as the street where Miss Minchin's school looms so impressively.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What a bewilderingly brilliant and entertaining movie this is.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    In this movie the war is not quite over. For those who survived it, maybe it will never be.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Once again, [Cameron] has silenced the doubters by simply delivering an extraordinary film. There is still at least one man in Hollywood who knows how to spend $250 million, or was it $300 million, wisely.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    But I'm making Welcome to the Dollhouse sound like some sort of grim sociological study, and in fact it's a funny, intensely entertaining film.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The Secret of the Grain never slows, always engages, may continue too long, but ends too soon. It is made of life itself.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It uses a colorful vocabulary, it contains a lot of energy, it elevates its miserable heroes to the status of icons (in their own eyes, that is).
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is a masterful and heartbreaking film, and it does honor to the memory of the victims.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The Bad News Bears is, in a way, [Ritchie's] most harrowing portrait of how we'd sometimes rather win than keep our self-respect. He directs scenes for comedy even in the face of his disturbing material and that makes the movie all the more effective; sometimes we laugh, and sometimes we can't, and the movie's working best when we're silent.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    These animals aren't catering to anyone in the audience. We get the feeling they're intensely leading their own lives without slowing down for ours.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    If you have seen the masterful 2002 Brazilian film "City of God" or the 1981 film "Pixote," both about the culture of Rio's street people, then Bus 174 plays like a sad and angry real-life sequel.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Amores Perros will be too much for some filmgoers, just as "Pulp Fiction" was and "Santa Sangre" certainly was, but it contains the spark of inspiration.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The story of herself (Varda), a woman whose life has consisted of moving through the world with the tools of her trade, finding what is worth treasuring.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Brave dissenting Islamic filmmakers are risking their lives to tell the story of the persecution of women, and it is a story worth knowing, and mourning.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Basically what we have here is a drama, with comedy occasionally lifting the mood. The result is a surprising seriousness; this isn't the mindless romp with cute animals.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Now we have an American film with the raw power of “City of God” or “Pixote,” a film that does something unexpected, and inspired, and brave.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It's the kind of movie you know you can trust, and you give yourself over to affection for these characters who are so lovingly observed.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The movie is funny, but it's more than funny, it's exhilarating.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Not the macabre horror story the title suggests, but a sweet and visually lovely tale of love lost.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie suggests that humans benefitted little from Project Nim, and Nim himself not at all.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    I have seen love scenes in which naked bodies thrash in sweaty passion, but I have rarely seen them more passionate than in this movie, where everyone is wrapped in layers of Victorian repression.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It's a real movie, full-blooded and smart, with qualities even for those who have no idea who Stan Lee is. It's a superhero movie for people who don't go to superhero movies, and for those who do, it's the one they've been yearning for.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It is a new documentary of a past event, recapturing the electricity generated by Muhammad Ali in his prime.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    I watched the film in a sort of reverie. The dancers seemed particularly absorbed. They had performed these dances many times before, but always with Pina Bausch present. Now they were on their own, in homage.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    McQueen is great in Bullitt, and the movie is great, because director Peter Yates understands the McQueen image and works within it. He winds up with about the best action movie of recent years.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The way Hugo deals with Melies is enchanting in itself, but the film's first half is devoted to the escapades of its young hero. In the way the film uses CGI and other techniques to create the train station and the city, the movie is breathtaking.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A documentary that is beyond strange, follows two arch-enemies in their grim, long-term rivalry, which involves way more time than any human lifetime should devote to Donkey Kong.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    In its warmth and in its enchantment, as well as in its laughs, this is the best comedy in a long time.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The details of the film and of the performances are meticulously realized; there is a reward in seeing artists working so well. But the story has no entry or exit, and is cold, sad and hopeless. Afterward, I feel more admiration than gratitude.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    this is a very good movie. Woody Allen is ... Woody, sublimely. Diane Keaton gives us a fresh and nicely edged New York intellectual. And Mariel Hemingway deserves some kind of special award for what's in some ways the most difficult role in the film.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie finds the right tone to present its bittersweet wisdom. It's relaxed. It's content to observe and listen.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is a mystery, this business of life. I can't think of any under cinematic undertaking that allows us to realize that more deeply.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Up in the Air takes the trust people once had in their jobs and pulls out the rug. It is a film for this time.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Duvall's screenplay does what great screenwriting is supposed to do, and surprises us with additional observations and revelations in every scene.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A movie made with charm and wit, and unlike some family movies it does not condescend, not for a second.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Put the two parts together, and Tarantino has made a masterful saga that celebrates the martial arts genre while kidding it, loving it, and transcending it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The strength of Leigh's film is that it is not a message picture, but a deep and true portrait of these lives.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A perplexing and disturbing film of great effect.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This is a brave, unflinching, sometimes virtually unwatchable documentary that makes such an effective case for both pro-choice and pro-life that it is impossible to determine which side the filmmaker, Tony Kaye, stands on. All you can conclude at the end is that both sides have effective advocates, but the pro-lifers also have some alarming people on their team.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Is something being hidden? No. It's more that something doesn't want to be known.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is a movie to surrender yourself to. If you require logic, see something else. Mulholland Drive works directly on the emotions, like music.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A harrowing look at institutional cruelty, perpetrated by the Catholic Church in Ireland, and justified by a perverted hysteria about sex.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A documentary with no pretense of objectivity. Here is Mike Tyson's story in his own words, and it is surprisingly persuasive.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    What works best in the film is the over-all vision. Branagh is able to see himself as a king, and so we can see him as one.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Although The White Diamond is entire of itself, it earns its place among the other treasures and curiosities in Herzog's work. Here is one of the most inquisitive filmmakers alive, a man who will go to incredible lengths to film people living at the extremes.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The documentary shows outrageous behavior, none more so than when they and many others are directed to a nearby Navy base for refuge.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Helena Bonham Carter may be Burton's inamorata, but apart from that, she is perfectly cast, not as a vulgar fishwife type but as a petite beauty with dark, sad eyes and a pouting mouth and a persistent fantasy that she and the barber will someday settle by the seaside. Not bloody likely.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Alexander Payne is a director whose satire is omnidirectional. He doesn't choose an easy target and march on it. He stands in the middle of his story and attacks on all directions.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    One of the qualities of Monsieur Lazhar is that it has no simple questions and simple answers. Its purpose is to present us with a situation, explore the people involved and show us a man who is dealing with his own deep hurts.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Watching this movie is like daydreaming.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The latest and one of the most harrowing films set along the religious divides in Israel.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Is the film watchable? Yes, compulsively.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Even when it's baffling, it's never boring. I've heard of airtight plots. This one is not merely airtight, but hermetically sealed.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    However much it conceals the real-life events that inspired it, it lives and breathes on its own, and as an extension of the mysterious whimsy of Tati.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The film most of all is about Hester, who stares out the window and smokes.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This is not a political documentary. It is a crime story. No matter what your politics, Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room will make you mad.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What a magical movie.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    You would imagine a film like this would be greeted with rapture in France, but no. The leading French film magazine, "Cahiers du Cinema," has long scorned the filmmakers of this older generation as makers of mere "quality," and interprets Tavernier's work as an attack on the New Wave generation which replaced them.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Cage and Shue make these cliches into unforgettable people.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The Mexican drug cartels have inspired countless films, but never one as final as Natalia Almada's documentary El Velador.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    An astonishing film.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Like "City of God," it feels organically rooted. Like many Le Carre stories, it begins with grief and proceeds with sadness toward horror. Its closing scenes are as cynical about international politics and commerce as I can imagine. I would like to believe they are an exaggeration, but I fear they are not. This is one of the year's best films.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Ron Howard's Parenthood is a delicate balancing act between comedy and truth, a movie that contains a lot of laughter and yet is more concerned with character than punch lines.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Algenis Perez Soto plays the character so openly, so naturally, that an interesting thing happens: Baseball is only the backdrop, not the subject. This is a wonderful film.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The high-tech stuff is flawlessly done, but the intriguing elements of the movie involve the performances.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The movie is well cast from top to bottom; like many British films, it benefits from the genius of its supporting players.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    All I know is, it is better to be the whale than the squid. Whales inspire major novels.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Jacques Perrin's Oscar-nominated Winged Migration does for birds what the 1996 documentary "Microcosmos" did for insects: It looks at them intimately, very close up, in shots that seem impossible to explain.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Was and is a brilliant horror film, one with an archetypal ability to reach and disturb us. If I were showing The Exorcist to a friend, I would show the 1973 version without the slightest hesitation.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    If quirky, independent, grown-up outsider filmmakers set out to make a family movie, this is the kind of movie they would make. And they did.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The movie deals with narrative housekeeping. Perhaps the next one will engage these characters in a more challenging and devious story, one more about testing their personalities than re-establishing them. In the meantime, you want space opera, you got it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It has been said that all modern Russian literature came out of Gogol’s “Overcoat.” In the same way, all of us came out of the overcoat of this same immigrant experience.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Sands' death is shown in a tableaux of increasing bleakness. It is agonizing, yet filmed with a curious painterly purity.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie, based on the famous comic novel by Stella Gibbons, is dour, eccentric and very funny, and depends on the British gift for treating madness as good common sense.

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