For 4,258 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 74% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 24% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 The Illusionist
Lowest review score: 0 The Life of David Gale
Score distribution:
4258 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    You hire an actor for his strengths, and Downey would not be strong as a one-dimensional mighty-man. He is strong because he is smart, quick and funny, and because we sense his public persona masks deep private wounds. By building on that, Favreau found his movie, and it's a good one.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What the film is really about is people who see themselves and their values as an organic whole. There are no pious displays here. No sanctimony, no preaching. Never even the word "religion." Just Johan, Esther and Marianne, all doing their best.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    I saw Tarzan once, and went to see it again. This kind of bright, colorful, hyperkinetic animation is a visual exhilaration.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Sixty seconds of wondering if someone is about to kiss you is more entertaining than 60 minutes of kissing. By understanding that, Mamet is able to deliver a G-rated film that is largely about adult sexuality.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The film's buried message is that there is a reservoir of admiration and affection for America, at least among the educated classes in the Arab world, and they do not equate the current administration with America.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This film is a documentary about the young man's devilment. He seems perfectly happy — ecstatic, even — seated at a table in front of a three-sided mirror and practicing card moves over and over and over again. As a kid, he learned moves from his grandfather. He moved away from home in his early teens.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is a wonderful film. There isn't a thing that I would change.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    De Palma's Untouchables, like the TV series that inspired it, depends more on cliches than on artistic invention.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A movie like this can get you thinking.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Intriguing in the way it dances in and out of the shadow of Bergman's autobiography.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Nolte and Coburn are magnificent in this film, which is like an expiation or amends for abusive men. It is revealing to watch them in their scenes together--to see how they're able to use physical presence to sketch the history of a relationship.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    There is an old saying: Be careful what you ask for, because you might get it. The Piano Teacher has a more ominous lesson: Be especially careful with someone who has asked for you.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Not the worst of the countless recent movies about good kids and hidebound, authoritatian older people. It may, however, be the most shameless in its attempt to pander to an adolescent audience.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Is it real? Is this whole story real? I refuse to ask that question. Life of Pi is all real, second by second and minute by minute, and what it finally amounts to is left for every viewer to decide. I have decided it is one of the best films of the year.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Those hoping to see a "vampire movie" will be surprised by a good film.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The film is labyrinthine and deceptive, and not in a way we anticipate. It becomes a pleasure for the mind.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie is sure to be appealing to younger viewers (they may find it more accessible and certainly less frightening than "Jurassic Park"), and it's smart enough to keep older viewers involved, too.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    By dropping in on this couple from time to time for the kinds of moments one of them might remember, the film is more honest than its characters.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    An amazing film. It is deep, rich, human. It is not about rich and poor, but about old and new. It is about the ancient war between tradition and feeling.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The information they eventually dislodge about Rodriguez suggests a secular saint, a deeply good man, whose music is the expression of a blessed inner being. I hope you're able to see this film. You deserve to. And yes, it exists because we need for it to.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Keane is played by Damian Lewis. Here he inhabits an edge of madness that Lodge Kerrigan understands with a fierce sympathy.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The kind of movie you settle into. It's supple and sophisticated, and it's not about much. It has no message and some will say it has no point. But it is a demonstration of grace and wit.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    A horrible experience of unbearable length, briefly punctuated by three or four amusing moments.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It's an astonishing film: weird, obsessed, drawing on subterranean impulses, hypnotic.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    We laugh, that we may not cry. But none of this philosophy comes close to the insane logic of "M*A*S*H," which is achieved through a peculiar marriage of cinematography, acting, directing, and writing.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A full-bore melodrama, told with passionate intensity, gloriously and darkly absurd. It centers on a performance by Natalie Portman that is nothing short of heroic.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie makes no attempt to soften the material or make it comforting through the cliches of melodrama.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Monsters, Inc. is cheerful, high-energy fun, and like the other Pixar movies, has a running supply of gags and references aimed at grownups.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The entire film, in fact, seems much more real than the usual action-crime-chase concoctions we've grown tired of. Here is a movie with respect for writing, acting and craft. It has respect for knowledgable moviegoers.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Bird wisely does not attempt to "explain" Parker's music by connecting experiences with musical discoveries. This is a film of music, not about it, and one of the most extraordinary things about it is that we are really, literally, hearing Parker on the soundtrack.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Somehow the movie fails to connect with the amazing energy of Hawking's ideas. We're left wanting to know more about either his theories or his life, but what we get is a little of each.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    One of the most perceptive of rock music biopics.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie will seem slow to some viewers, unless they are alert to the raging emotions, the cruel unfairness and the desperation that are masked by the measured and polite words of the characters.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Regaled for 50 years by the stupendous idiocy of the American version of Godzilla, audiences can now see the original Japanese version, which is equally idiotic.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    What draws us into Private Property is how so many things happen under the surface, never commented upon.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The movie is carefully modulated to draw us deeper and deeper into the situation, and uses no contrived plot devices to superimpose plot jolts on what is, after all, a story involving four civilized people who are only trying, each in a different way, to find happiness.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie is well and fearlessly acted, and the writer-director (Fatih Akin) is determined to follow her story to a logical and believable conclusion, rather than letting everyone off the hook with a conventional ending.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It is sophomoric, obvious, predictable, corny, and quite often very funny. And the reason it's funny is frequently because it's sophomoric, predictable, corny, etc. Example: Airplane Captain (Peter Graves): Surely you can't be serious. Doctor (Leslie Nielsen): I am serious. And don’t call me Shirley. This sort of humor went out with Milton Berle, Jerry Lewis, and knock-knock jokes. That's why it's so funny.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It's intense and involving, and it doesn't let us go.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    One of the delights of The Taste of Others is that it is so smart and wears its intelligence lightly. Films about taste are not often made by Hollywood, perhaps because it would so severely limit the box office to require the audience to have any.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    One of the truest films I've seen about the ebb and flow of a real relationship.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    What it comes down to is: Pierre is a lousy adulterer. He lacks the desire, the reason and the skill.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Imagine the forges of hell crossed with the extraterrestrial saloon on Tatooine, and you have a notion of Guillermo del Toro's Hellboy II: The Golden Army.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie is about imperfect characters in a difficult world, who mostly do the best they can under the circumstances, but not always. Do you realize what a revolutionary approach that is for a movie these days?
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Although the narration is addressed to his wife, we learn little about her, his family or his personal life; he is used primarily as a guide through the milestones of the Congo's brief two-month experiment with democracy.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Not about murder in the literal sense, although that seems a possibility. It is about a man who would like to kill his father, and who may have been killed spiritually by his father.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    We've seen this done before, but seldom so well, or at such a high pitch of energy.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie is a record by well-meaning people who try to make a difference for the better, and succeed to a small degree while all around them the horror continues unaffected.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Putty Hill makes no statement. It looks. It looks with as much perception and sympathy as it is possible for a film to look. It is surprisingly effective.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The affirmation at the end of the film is so joyous that this is one of the few movies in a long time that inspires tears of happiness, and earns them. The Color Purple is the year's best film.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Music was the ANC's most dangerous weapon, and we see footage of streets lined with tens of thousands of marchers, singing and dancing, expressing an unquenchable spirit.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The strength of the thriller genre is that it provides stories with built-in energy and structure. The weakness is that thrillers often seem to follow foreseeable formulas. Frears and his writer, Steve Knight, use the power of the thriller and avoid the weaknesses in giving us, really, two movies for the price of one.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The film is exhilarating to watch because Sandler, liberated from the constraints of formula, reveals unexpected depths as an actor.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Halloween is an absolutely merciless thriller, a movie so violent and scary that, yes, I would compare it to “Psycho.”
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie's schizophrenia keeps it from greatness (this film has no firm idea of what it is about), but doesn't make it bad. It is, in fact, sort of fascinating: a film in the act of becoming, a field trial, an experiment in which a dreamy poet meditates on stark reality.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The part that needs work didn't cost money. It's the screenplay. Having created the characters and fashioned the outline, Tarantino doesn't do much with his characters except to let them talk too much, especially when they should be unconscious from shock and loss of blood.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It looks and listens to its characters, curious about the unfolding mysteries of the personality. It is a treasure.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Odd is played by Baard Owe, a trim, fit man with a neat mustache, who may cause you to think a little of James Stewart, Jacques Tati or Jean Rochefort.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The most significant fact of the film is that the prosecutor Gunson, a straight-laced Mormon, agrees with the defender Dalton that justice was not served.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The film begins slowly with a murky plot and too many new characters, but builds to a sensational climax.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie is entertaining on its own terms, and Washington's warmth at the center of it is like our own bemusement, as together we return to the shadows of noir.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The Devil's Backbone has been compared to "The Others," and has the same ambition and intelligence, but is more compelling and even convincing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Brief, spare and heartbreaking.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Whoever cast De Niro and Grodin must have had a sixth sense for the chemistry they would have; they work together so smoothly, and with such an evident sense of fun, that even their silences are intriguing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The Guard is a pleasure. I can't tell if it's really (bleeping) dumb or really (bleeping) smart, but it's pretty (bleeping) good.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It is just plain talky and boring. You know there's something wrong with a movie when the last third feels like the last half.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This is a loving, moving, inspiring, quirky documentary that was made while the lives it records were being lived.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    I admired this Harry Potter. It opens and closes well, and has wondrous art design and cinematography as always, only more so.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Movies like Hard Eight remind me of what original, compelling characters the movies can sometimes give us.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A valuable, heartbreaking film about the way those resources are plugged into a system, drained of their usefulness and discarded.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Wickedly funny.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    All of these moments unfold in a film of astonishing maturity and confidence; Eve's Bayou, one of the very best films of the year, is the debut of its writer and director, Kasi Lemmons.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Lacks any formulas or solutions, and is content to show us its complicated characters, their tangled lives, and the way that our need to love and be loved can lead us in opposite directions.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A passionate and explicit film about sexual obsession.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Unlike most remakes, the Nolan "Insomnia" is not a pale retread, but a re-examination of the material, like a new production of a good play.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This film is a wonder - the best work yet by one of our most original and independent filmmakers - and after it is over, and you begin to think about it, its meanings begin to flower.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The effect is strange and delightful; somehow the style lends quasi-credibility to a story that is entirely preposterous.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It's one of those films where you feel the authority right away: This movie knows its characters, knows its story, and knows exactly how it wants to tell us about them.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    He is one of the most prolific and generous of directors, and there is no word that summarizes a "Tavernier film," except, usually, masterful.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Its most impressive accomplishment is to gather a bewildering labyrinth of facts and suspicions over a period of years, and make the journey through this maze frightening and suspenseful.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The movie has an emotional payoff I failed to anticipate. It expresses hope in human nature. It is one of the year's best films.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It is miserable work, even after they grow accustomed to the smell. But it is useful work, and I have been thinking much about the happiness to be found by work that is honest and valuable.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    More reverie and meditation than reportage.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Too many films about the dead involve mourning, and too few involve laughter. Yet at lucky funerals there is a desire to remember the good times.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A tender and passionate protest, not without laughter, by Bertrand Tavernier -- a director who is not only gifted but honorable.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    I think the answer is right there in the film, but less visible to American viewers because we are less class-conscious than the filmmakers.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is a good film, but it would not cheer people up much at a high school reunion.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Since it is by Wong Kar Wai, 2046 is visually stunning. He uses three cinematographers but one style, that tries to evoke mood more than meaning. The movie as a whole, unfortunately, never seems sure of itself. It's like a sketchbook. These are images, tones, dialogue and characters that Wong is sure of, and he practices them, but he does not seem very sure why he is making the movie, or where it should end.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is the kind of movie where you laugh occasionally and have a silly grin most of the rest of the time.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Seeps with melancholy, old wounds, repressed anger, lust. That it is also caustically funny and heartwarming is miraculous.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It is filled with good-hearted fun, with performances by actors who seem to be smacking their lips and by a certain true innocence that survives all of Reiner's satire.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    There is no mechanical plot that has to grind to a Hollywood conclusion, and no contrived test for the heroes to pass; this is a movie about two particular young men, and how they pass their lives.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is one of the year's best films.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The film is told almost entirely without dialogue, but is alive to sound; we spend observant, introspective hours in a Hungarian hamlet where nothing much seems to happen -- oh, except that there's a suspicious death.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Bernardo Bertolucci's Last Tango in Paris is one of the great emotional experiences of our time.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The end of the film understandably lays on the emotion a little heavily, but until then Courage Under Fire has been a fascinating emotional and logistical puzzle--almost a courtroom movie, with the desert as the courtroom.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Kramer vs. Kramer is a movie of good performances, and it had to be, because the performances can't rest on conventional melodrama.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie is, indeed, perhaps the most believable that Herzog has made. For a director who gravitates toward the extremes of human behavior, this film involves extreme behavior, yes, but behavior forced by the circumstances.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    No Way Out is a superior example of the genre, a film in which a simple situation grows more and more complex until it turns into a nightmare not only for the hero but also for everyone associated with him. At the same time, it respects the audience's intelligence, gives us a great deal of information, trusts us to put it together and makes the intellectual analysis of the situation one of the movie's great pleasures.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Ron Howard's film of this mission is directed with a single-mindedness and attention to detail that makes it riveting.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Whether the protest movement hastened the end of the Vietnam War is hard to say, but it is likely that Lyndon Johnson's decision not to run for re-election was influenced by the climate it helped to create.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    I would not want to see a sequel to the film, and at 81 minutes it isn't a second too short, but what it does, it does cheerfully, with great energy, and very well.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Before Sunrise is so much like real life - like a documentary with an invisible camera - that I found myself remembering real conversations I had experienced with more or less the same words.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Sleeper establishes Woody Allen as the best comic director and actor in America, a distinction that would mean more if there were more comedies being made.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is a portrait of tunnel vision. Jiro exists to make sushi. Sushi exists to be made by Jiro.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It seems to me that Campbell has a good case here--good enough, anyway, to convince the judges on the African court.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is the kind of movie you'll relate to if you love film itself, rather than its surface aspects such as story and stars. It's not a movie for casual audiences, and it may not reveal all its secrets the first time through, but it announces Wong Kar-Wai, its Hong Kong-based director, as a filmmaker in the tradition of Jean-Luc Godard.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Pollock is confident, insightful work--one of the year's best films.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Has the courage to work without a net, aware that when you're a teenager, your life is not a story so much as a million possible stories.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Nunez has a gift for finding the essence, the soul, of his actors.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    In the world of this film, conventional piety is overturned and we see into the soul of a human monster.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    There are many scholars and critics here, most of them useful and pleasant, who obviously love him. Most remarkably, there is his granddaughter, Bel Kaufman, still looking terrific at 100, who had writing in her blood and wrote "Up the Down Staircase."
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Basically the movie is a bubble-headed series of teenage crises and crushes, alternating with historically accurate choreography of such forgotten dances as the Madison and the Roach.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Red Riding Trilogy is an immersive experience like "The Best of Youth," "Brideshead Revisited" or "Nicholas Nickleby."
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    There are a couple of moments in Jerry Maguire when you want to hug yourself with delight. Both of those moments involve the actress Renee Zellweger, whose lovability is one of the key elements in a movie that starts out looking cynical and quickly becomes a heartwarmer.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Eminem survives the X-ray truth-telling of the movie camera, which is so good at spotting phonies. He is on the level.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This movie is the work of a man who knows how to direct a thriller. Smooth, calm, confident, it builds suspense instead of depending on shock and action.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The documentary shows what a tight-knit group the Chicks are.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The story, about an ant colony that frees itself from slavery to grasshoppers, is similar in some ways to the autumn's other big animated release, "Antz," but it's aimed at a broader audience and lacks the in-jokes.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    To the degree that you will want to see this movie, it will be because of the surprise, and so I will say no more, except to say that the "solution," when it comes, solves little - unless there is really little to solve, which is also a possibility.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Hard-boiled, filled with action, held together by male camaraderie, directed with a lean economy of action. It's one of the most expensive B-pictures ever made, and I think that helps it fit the subject. "A" war movies are about War, but "B" war movies are about soldiers. (Review of Original Release)
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Firth plays George superbly, as a man who prepares a face to meet the faces that he meets.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This is a writer's picture, no less than a visual experience that approaches its subject as tactfully as the messengers do. No fancy camerawork. It happens, we absorb it.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Watching the movie, I was reminded of the documentary "Crumb"...There is a line that sometimes runs between genius and madness, sometimes encircles them.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It contains risk, violence, a little romance, even fleeting moments of humor, but most of all, it sees what danger and heartbreak are involved. It is riveting from start to finish.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    What is remarkable is that this film is based on a true story, and filmed on the actual locations. These are hard, violent men, risking their lives to save an animal species.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    There is a jolting surprise in discovering that this film has free will, and can end as it wants, and that its director can make her point, however brutally.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Not an easy film and is for those few moviegoers who approach a serious movie almost in the attitude of prayer.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Both impressive and disappointing. From a technical and craft point of view it is first-rate; from its standing in the canon of the two directors, it is minor.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Body Heat is good enough to make film noir play like we hadn't seen it before.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The funniest American comedy of the year.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It's also interesting to see how little screen time the final disco competition really has, considering how large it looms in our memories.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The kind of film I instinctively respond to. Leave logic at the door. Do not expect subdued taste and restraint, but instead a kind of operatic ecstasy.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Jarecki's film makes a shattering case against the War on Drugs.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Not very much happens in Metropolitan, and yet everything that happens is felt deeply, because the characters in this movie are still too young to have perfected their defenses against life.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    If you see only one martial arts Western this year (and there is probably an excellent chance of that), this is the one.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    All of this is just plain enjoyable. I liked it, but please don't make me say it's deeply moving or redemptive and uplifting. It's a genre piece for character actors is what it is, and that's an honorable thing for it to be.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Many of the scenes in this movie are almost formula, despite the energy of Scorsese's direction and the good performances. They come in the same places we would expect them to come in a movie by anybody else, and they contain the same events.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    In an era when hundreds of lives are casually destroyed in action movies, here is an entire film in which one life is honored, and one death is avenged.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Katie Dellamaggiore's inspiring documentary covers two years in the history of the school chess team, during which one team member, Rochelle Ballantyn, approaches her dream of becoming the first female African-American grandmaster in U.S history.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Some cases should never come to trial, because no verdict would be adequate. You are likely to be discussing this film long into the night.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The best elements of Water involve the young girl and the experiences seen through her eyes. I would have been content if the entire film had been her story.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A startling documentary.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The film only wants to amuse. It's a reminder that Dogma films need not involve pathetic characters tormented by the misuse of their genitalia, but can simply want to have a little fun.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    How much was legend, how much was pose, how much was real? I think it was all real, and the documentary suggests as much.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    One of those joyous films that leaps over national boundaries and celebrates universal human nature.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Siskel and Jacobs focus on the performances, which are inspiring and electrifying.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It is pitch-perfect, telling the story through the enthusiastic and single-minded vision of its hero Ralphie, and finding in young Peter Billingsley a sly combination of innocence and calculation.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The Big Easy is one of the richest American films of the year. It also happens to be a great thriller.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Not many movies like this get made, because not many filmmakers are so bold, angry and defiant.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Still Bill is about a man who topped the charts, walked away from it all in 1985 and is pleased that he did.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    What is the use of a film like this? It inspires reflection... Mike Leigh's films realize that for most people, most days, life consists of the routine of earning a living, broken by fleeting thoughts of where our efforts will someday take us--financially, romantically, spiritually or even geographically. We never arrive in most of those places, but the mental images are what keep us trying.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Here is a good and joyous man who leads a life that is perfect for him, and how many people do we meet like that? This movie made me happy every moment I was watching it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This is not a film most people will enjoy. Its qualities are apparent only if appreciates cinematic style for itself.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A voluptuary of a film, drunk on primary colors, caressing Penelope Cruz, using the devices of a Hitchcock to distract us with surfaces while the sinister uncoils beneath. As it ravished me, I longed for a freeze frame to allow me to savor a shot.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The film has an odd subterranean power. It doesn't strive for our sympathy or make any effort to portray Rosetta as colorful, winning or sympathetic.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Takes advantage of the road movie genre, which requires only a goal and then permits great freedom in the events along the way.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The film takes the form but not the feel of a comic thriller. It's quirkier than that.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Kandahar does not provide deeply drawn characters, memorable dialogue or an exciting climax. Its traffic is in images.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    What surprised me was how much I admired Kristen Stewart, who in "Twilight," was playing below her grade level. Here is an actress ready to do important things. Together, and with the others, they make Adventureland more real and more touching than it may sound.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    What we sense in the film is the camaraderie among these hopeful dancers. They've all been through the process before, all been disappointed before, all know better than anyone else what it takes, all believe the best candidates don't always win the jobs.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The whole plot smells fishy. It's not that the movie is hiding something, but that when it's revealed, it's been left sitting too long at room temperature. Inside Man goes to much difficulty to arrive at too little.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The music is terrific. Idania Valdes dubs Rita's sensuous, smoky singing voice, and the film is essentially constructed as a musical.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Lost in America is being called a yuppie comedy, but it's really about the much more universal subjects of greed, hedonism and panic. What makes it so funny is how much we can identify with it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This is a parable about modern Iran, and like many recent Iranian films it leaves its meaning to the viewer. One of the wise decisions by Rafi Pitts, its writer, director and star, is to include no dialogue that ever actually states the politics of its hero.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    In the way it combines sports with human nature, it reminded me of another wonderful Indiana sports movie, "Breaking Away." It's a movie that is all heart.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    What makes it special, apart from the Ephron screenplay, is the chemistry between Crystal and Ryan.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The violence in this movie is gruesome (a scene involving the disposal of bodies is particularly graphic). But the movie has many human qualities and contains what will be remembered as one of Pacino's finest scenes.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Jesus' Son surprises me with moments of wry humor, poignancy, sorrow and wildness. It has a sequence as funny as any I've seen this year.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    One of the most visually inventive films I have ever seen.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    In America is not unsentimental about its new arrivals (the movie has a warm heart and frankly wants to move us), but it is perceptive about the countless ways in which it is hard to be poor and a stranger in a new land.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Has maturity and emotional depth: There are no cheap shots, nothing is thrown in for effect, realism is placed ahead of easy dramatic payoffs, and the audience grows deeply involved.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    James Mangold's 3:10 to Yuma restores the wounded heart of the Western and rescues it from the morass of pointless violence.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    He's (Fukunaga) a director with a sure visual sense, here expressed in voluptuous visuals and ambitious art direction.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    What I was left with was the goodness of Buck Brannaman as a man. He was dealt a hand that might have destroyed him. He overcame his start and is now a wise and influential role model. He does unto horses as he wishes his father had done onto him.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    An endlessly fascinating movie.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This profound and immensely touching film in only 75 perfect minutes achieves the profundity of an epic.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Above all, the dialogue is complex enough to allow the characters to say what they're thinking: They are eloquent, insightful, fanciful, poetic when necessary. They're not trapped with cliches.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A formula thriller done as an elegant genre exercise. Johnny Hallyday was brought in by To as a last-minute sub for Alain Delon, and could have been the first choice: He is tall, weathered, grim and taciturn.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The film would have benefitted by being less encompassing and focusing on a more limited number of emblematic characters -- Meinhof and Herold, for starters.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    So strong, so shocking and yet so audacious that people walk out shaking their heads; they don't know quite what to make of it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The experience is frightening, sometimes disgusting, and (if the truth be told) exhilarating. This is very skillful filmmaking, and Mad Max 2 is a movie like no other.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Here is an entire movie about looking cool while not wiping out. Call it a metaphor for life.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is nearly flawless.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The film's second half is the most touching, because it shows that our lives are not merely our own, but also belong to the events we set in motion.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    May be the most intimate documentary ever made about a live rock 'n' roll concert. Certainly it has the best coverage of the performances onstage.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A direct, spare, touching film.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    As well-directed a film as you'll see from America this year, an unsentimental and yet completely involving story of a young man who cannot see a way around his fate.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A fascinating study of behavior that violates the rules.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Munch's screenplay is tenderly observant of his characters. He watches them as they float within the seas of their personalities. His scenes are short and often unexpected. The story unfolds in sidelong glances.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The ending of the film is as calculated and cruel as a verbal assault by a Neil LaBute character.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Jeunet brings everything together -- his joyously poetic style, the lovable Tautou, a good story worth the telling -- into a film that is a series of pleasures stumbling over one another in their haste to delight us.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A collision at the intersection of farce and tragedy--the apocalypse as a joke on us.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Here is a tense and sorrowful film where common sense struggles with blood lust.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Here was a great artist. She enjoyed her life. She didn't complain at the time, she didn't complain when she went cold turkey, she didn't complain in her 80s.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It is enormously ambitious -- maybe too much so, since it ranges so widely between styles and strategies that it distracts from its own flow.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A linear story, or one that was fragmented more clearly, could have been more effective. Still, a good film, ambitious and effective, introducing a gifted young actress and a director whose work I'll anticipate.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The central performance in Brothers is by Connie Nielsen, who is strong, deep and true.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Some women are simply sexy forever. Helen Mirren is a woman like that. She's 64. As she enters her 70s, we'll begin to develop a fondness for sexy septuagenarians.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Margin Call employs an excellent cast who can make financial talk into compelling dialogue. They also can reflect the enormity of what is happening: Their company and their lives are being rendered meaningless.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    World on a Wire is slowed down compared to most Fassbinder. He usually evokes overwrought passions, sudden angers and jealousies, emotional explosions, people hiding turmoil beneath a surface of pose. Here there's less of that emotional energy. But if you know Fassbinder, you might want to see this as an exercise of his mind, a demonstration of how one of his stories might be transformed by the detachment of science fiction.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Here is a rare movie that begins by telling us how it will end and is about how the hero has no idea why.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A film that with quiet confidence creates a fragile magic.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Tries hard to be a good film, but if it had relaxed a little, it might have been great.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    (Coppola) has the courage to play it in a minor key.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    I like the way the slacker characters maintain their slothful gormlessness in the face of urgent danger, and I like the way the British bourgeois values of Shaun's mum and dad assert themselves even in the face of catastrophe.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    House Party is silly and high-spirited and not particularly significant, and that is just as it should be.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Maybe the environment is poisoned, and the group is phony, and Carol is gnawing away at her own psychic health. Now there's a fine mess.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    As for Beatty, Reds is his bravura turn. He got the idea, nurtured it for a decade, found the financing, wrote most of the script, produced, and directed and starred and still found enough artistic detachment to make his Reed into a flawed, fascinating enigma instead of a boring archetypal hero. I liked this movie. I felt a real fondness for it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Interlaces interviews with the surviving Funk Brothers with new performances of many of the hit songs, and some sequences in which events of the past are re-created. The flashback sequences are not especially effective, but are probably better than more talking heads. Or maybe not.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    If Scott Fitzgerald were to return to life, he would feel at home in a Whit Stillman movie. Stillman listens to how people talk, and knows what it reveals about them.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Doesn't have the theatrical subtext or, let it be said, the genius of Richard Pryor.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Because the film is well-acted and written with intelligence, it might be worth seeing, despite my objections. I suspect my own feelings.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is, first of all, an electrifying and poignant love story....And it is also one hell of a thriller.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    All of this grows tiresome. We're given no particular reason at the outset of The Loneliest Planet to care about these people, our interest doesn't grow along the way, the landscape grows repetitive, the director's approach is aggressively minimalist, and if you ask me, this romance was not made in heaven.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    The footage on the Paris Island obstacle course is powerful. But Full Metal Jacket is uncertain where to go, and the movie's climax, which Kubrick obviously intends to be a mighty moral revelation, seems phoned in from earlier war pictures.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Using a dialogue-heavy approach that's unusual for Cronenberg, his film is skilled at the way it weaves theory with the inner lives of its characters. We are learning, yet never feel we're being taught.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The ghost of anime can be seen here trying to dive into the shell of the movie mainstream. But this particular film is too complex and murky to reach a large audience, I suspect; it's not until the second hour that the story begins to reveal its meaning. But I enjoyed its visuals, its evocative soundtrack (including a suite for percussion and heavy breathing), and its ideas.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Entertaining and surprisingly amusing, under the circumstances. The film is in a better state of mind than its characters. Its humor comes, as the best humor does, from an acute observation of human nature.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The Last of the Mohicans is not as authentic and uncompromised as it claims to be -- more of a matinee fantasy than it wants to admit -- but it is probably more entertaining as a result.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is an engrossing story, told smoothly and well, and Russell Crowe's contribution is enormous.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Exists on a knife edge between comedy and sadness. There are big laughs, and then quiet moments when we're touched.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It probably is unforgivably bourgeois to admire a film because of its locations, but in the case of The Last Emperor the narrative cannot be separated from the awesome presence of the Forbidden City, and from Bertolucci's astonishing use of locations, authentic costumes and thousands of extras to create the everyday reality of this strange little boy.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Submarine isn't an insipid teen sex comedy. It flaunts some stylistic devices, such as titles and sections and self-aware narration, but it doesn't try too hard to be desperately clever.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie is astonishingly foul-mouthed, but in a fluent, confident way where the point isn't the dirty words, but the flow and rhythm, and the deep, sad yearning they represent.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The effect of this scene is so powerful that I leaned forward like a jury member, wanting her to get away with it so I could find her innocent.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Reviewing The Naked Gun... is like reporting on a monologue by Rodney Dangerfield - you can get the words but not the music.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is not a major Spielberg film, although it is an effortlessly watchable one.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The movie is as intelligent a thriller as you'll see this year.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Streep wisely goes for oblique humor rather than straight-ahead villainy, making the character different and yet just as loathsome.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    I have a weakness for actresses like Greta Gerwig. She looks reasonable and approachable.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A compelling thriller to begin with, but it adds the rare quality of having a heroine more fascinating than the story.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is a film situated precisely on the dividing line between traditional family entertainment and the newer action-oriented family films. It is charming and scary in about equal measure, and confident for the first two acts that it can be wonderful without having to hammer us into enjoying it, or else. Then it starts hammering.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Oshima, directing his first film in 14 years, has found an actor with the physical attributes to play the character and seems content to leave it at that; his camera regards Sozaburo as an object of beauty but hardly seems to engage him.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It's better to know going in that you're not expected to be able to fit everything together, that you may lose track of some members of the large cast, that it's like attending a family reunion when it's not your family and your hosts are too drunk to introduce you around.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It's Mamet in a lighthearted mood, playing with dialogue, repeating phrases just because he likes them, and supplying us with a closing line that achieves, I think, a kind of greatness.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Rango is some kind of a miracle: An animated comedy for smart moviegoers, wonderfully made, great to look at, wickedly satirical, and (gasp!) filmed in glorious 2-D.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is the kind of movie that baffles Hollywood, because it isn't made from any known formula and doesn't follow the rules.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    One of the most involving of the many first-rate thrillers that have come recently from Scandinavia.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    What is finally clear: It doesn't matter a damn what your will says if you have $25 billion, and politicians and the establishment want it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The film's headlong momentum streamrolls over all our questions, and we're carried along by the expertly choreographed action. Even after everything seems over, it isn't, and the last minutes are particularly satisfying.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    May be a sardonic view of Japanese corporate culture, but that's not all it is. The movie is also subtly sexual and erotic, despite the fact that every scene takes place in the office and there is not a single overt sexual act or word or gesture or reference.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Warren Beatty's Bulworth made me laugh -- and wince.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Leconte brings his film to transcendent closure without relying on stale plot devices or the clanking of the plot. He resorts to a kind of poetry. After the film is over, you want to sigh with joy, that in this rude world such civilization is still possible.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Somehow isn't as exciting as a duel over a woman should be.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Mullen and Garfield anchor the film. Mullen, that splendid Scottish actor ("My Name Is Joe") and Garfield, 24, with his boyish face and friendly grin.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    An Officer and a Gentleman is the best movie about love that I've seen in a long time.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The very best thing about the movie is its dialogue. Paul Brickman, who wrote and directed, has an ear so good that he knows what to leave out.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It is a skillful, well-made film, although, since Ellsberg is the narrator, it doesn't probe him very deeply.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    You don't guess the true horror of the place, which is that there are no secrets, because everyone here knows all about everyone else, inside and out, top to bottom, and has for years.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    No one, male or female, has any fun, but the men behave as if they do. They are all half-stupefied by the languor in which they drown.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The Flower of My Secret is likely to be disappointing to Almodovar's admirers, and inexplicable to anyone else.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Here is a movie that knows its women, listens to them, doesn't give them a pass, allows them to be real: It's a rebuke to the shallow "Ya-Ya Sisterhood."
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    There is a kind of horror movie that plays so convincingly we don't realize it's an exercise in pure style. ''Halloween'' is an example, and John Dahl's Joy Ride is another.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie's strength is not in its story but in its unsettling and weirdly effective visual and sound style. (Review of Original Release)
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Although it seems to borrow the pattern of the traditional boxing movie, the boxer here is not the usual self-destructive character, but the center of maturity and balance in a community in turmoil.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie, which should have been titled "Defend the Block," illustrates once again that zombie, horror and monster movies are a port of entry for new filmmakers. The genre is the star.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie has good special effects and suitably gruesome characters, but it's bloodless.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It is a good story, a natural, and it grabs us. But just as there is almost no way to screw it up, so there's hardly any way to bring it above a certain level of inspiration.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    I'm happy I saw Win Win. It would have been possible to be happier.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Emily is played by Maggie Cheung with such intense desperation that she won the best actress award at Cannes 2004.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Riedelsheimer, earlier made "Rivers and Tides" (2002), about another artist from Scotland, Andy Goldsworthy, whose art involves materials found in nature...Evelyn Glennie and Andy Goldsworthy have in common a profound sensitivity to their environments.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The story touches many themes, lingers with some of them, moves on and arrives at nowhere in particular. It's not a story so much as a reverie about possible stories.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Movies like Tumbleweeds exist in the details, not the outcome. Even a happy ending, we suspect, would be temporary. We don't mind, since the characters have been intriguing to know and easy to care about.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The point of the movie is not the plot, but the character and the atmosphere.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    What's best about the movie is its playfulness.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie pays off in a kind of emotional complexity rarely seen in crime movies.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    I had to forget what I knew about Black. He creates this character out of thin air, it's like nothing he's done before, and it proves that an actor can be a miraculous thing in the right role.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Heart-stopping in its coverage of the brave and risky attempt by a scientist named James Balog and his team of researchers on the Extreme Ice Survey, where "extreme" refers to their efforts almost more than to the ice.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Bridesmaids seems to be a more or less deliberate attempt to cross the Chick Flick with the Raunch Comedy. It definitively proves that women are the equal of men in vulgarity, sexual frankness, lust, vulnerability, overdrinking and insecurity.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A funny, wickedly self-aware musical that opens by acknowledging they've outlived their shelf life.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Am I acting as an advocate in this review? Yes, I am. I believe that to be "impartial" and "balanced" on global warming means one must take a position like Gore's. There is no other view that can be defended.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Doesn't replace "Fingers," but joins it as the portrait of a man reaching out desperately toward his dying ideals.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Lili Taylor plays Solanas as mad but not precisely irrational. She gives the character spunk, irony and a certain heroic courage.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    More important, it has a Disney willingness to allow fantasy into life, so New York seems to acquire a new playbook.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The purpose of the movie is perhaps to show us, in a quietly amusing way, that while we travel down our own lifelines, seeing everything from our own points of view, we hardly suspect the secrets of the lives we intersect with.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Funny, in that peculiar British way where jokes are told sideways, with the obvious point and then the delayed zinger.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The texture of the film is enough to recommend it, even apart from the story.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The kind of film I more and more find myself seeking out, a film that seems alive in the sense that it appears to have free will; if, in the middle of a revenge tragedy, it feels like adding a suite for hoes and percussion, it does.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Bright, lively and entertaining, but it's no "Shrek." Maybe it's too much to expect lightning to strike twice.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    On the basis of its scale, energy and magical events, this is the Hong Kong equivalent of a big-budget Hollywood blockbuster. But it transcends them with the stylization of the costumes, the panoply of the folklore, the richness of the setting, and the fact that none of the characters (allegedly) have superpowers.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The Witnesses doesn't pay off with a great operatic pinnacle, but it's better that way. Better to show people we care about facing facts they care desperately about, without the consolation of plot mechanics.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Watching Holbrook, I was reminded again of how steady and valuable this man has been throughout his career.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The film's implication, quite starkly, is that a strong military doesn't favor crybabies, that a certain degree of rape is unavoidable - and inevitably, that some women may have been asking for it. One hearing noted that the victim was dressed provocatively. In her official uniform.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A wild elaboration. If you have never seen a Japanese anime, start here. If you love them, Metropolis proves you are right.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Seen simply as a film, The Motorcycle Diaries is attenuated and tedious. We understand that Ernesto and Alberto are friends, but that's about all we find out about them; they develop none of the complexities of other on-the-road couples, like Thelma and Louise, Bonnie and Clyde or Huck and Jim. There isn't much chemistry.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The key element in any action picture, I think, is a good villain. Terminator 2 has one, along with an intriguing hero and fierce heroine, and a young boy who is played by Furlong with guts and energy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Portrait of men and a few women who stubbornly try to maintain some dignity in the face of personal disaster.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Middle of Nowhere isn't a highly charged drama, as you might have gathered. Most of the action takes place within the mind of a lonely woman. That's why Corinealdi is so effective in the lead.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A new documentary about the life of this producer who put together one of the most remarkable winning streaks in Hollywood history, and followed it with a losing streak that almost destroyed him. It's one of the most honest films ever made about Hollywood.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    As an inside view of the bursting of the Internet bubble, Startup.com is definitive.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    We realize that the most frightening outcome of the movie would be if it contained no surprises, no revelations, no quirky twist at the end.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The director, Peter Cattaneo, takes material that could would be at home in a sex comedy, and gives it gravity because of the desperation of the characters; we glimpse the home life of these men, who have literally been put on the shelf, and we see the wound to their pride.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie, written and directed by Dylan Kidd, depends on its dialogue, and like a film by David Mamet or Neil LaBute has characters who use speech like an instrument. The screenplay would be entertaining just to read, as so very few are.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Emerges as an accurate memory of that time when the American melting pot, splendid as a theory, became a reality.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    It lovingly, almost sadistically, lays out the situation and deliberately demonstrates all the things that can go wrong. And I mean all the things.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Nothing Cruise has done will prepare you for what he does in Born on the Fourth of July. His performance is so good that the movie lives through it. Stone is able to make his statement with Cruise's face and voice and doesn't need to put everything into the dialogue.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Imagine music for a sorcery-related plot and then dial it down to ominous forebodings. Without Thomas Newman's score, Side Effects would be a lesser film, even another film.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What a lovely film this is, so gentle and whimsical, so simple and profound.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Kicking and Screaming doesn't have much of a plot, but of course it wouldn't; this is a movie about characters waiting for their plots to begin.

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