For 4,404 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 74% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 24% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Undertow
Lowest review score: 0 Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo
Score distribution:
4404 movie reviews
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    On the surface, Lucas has made a film that seems almost artless; his teenagers cruise Main Street and stop at Mel’s Drive-In and listen to Wolfman Jack on the radio and neck and lay rubber and almost convince themselves their moment will last forever. But the film’s buried structure shows an innocence in the process of being lost, and as its symbol Lucas provides the elusive blonde in the white Thunderbird -- the vision of beauty always glimpsed at the next intersection, the end of the next street.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A great visionary achievement, a film so original and exciting, it stirred my imagination like "Metropolis" and "2001: A Space Odyssey."
    • 51 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A darker, deeper fantasy epic than the "Rings" trilogy, "The Chronicles of Narnia" or the "Potter" films. It springs from the same British world of quasi-philosophical magic, but creates more complex villains and poses more intriguing questions. As a visual experience, it is superb. As an escapist fantasy, it is challenging.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    One of the most visually inventive films I have ever seen.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Its surface is as much fun as any movie ever made. Its depths surpass understanding. I have analyzed it a shot at a time with more than 30 groups, and together we have seen, I believe, pretty much everything that is there on the screen. The more clearly I can see its physical manifestation, the more I am stirred by its mystery.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The Karate Kid was one of the nice surprises of 1984 -- an exciting, sweet-tempered, heart-warming story with one of the most interesting friendships in a long time.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    I was carried along by the wit, the energy and a surprising sweetness.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is, first of all, an electrifying and poignant love story....And it is also one hell of a thriller.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Does what many great films do, creating a time, place and characters so striking that they become part of our arsenal of images for imagining the world.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Like "City of God," it feels organically rooted. Like many Le Carre stories, it begins with grief and proceeds with sadness toward horror. Its closing scenes are as cynical about international politics and commerce as I can imagine. I would like to believe they are an exaggeration, but I fear they are not. This is one of the year's best films.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is a good movie, from a masterful novel.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This great film by Anthony Fabian tells this story through the eyes of a happy girl who grows into an outsider.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Ray
    The movie would be worth seeing simply for the sound of the music and the sight of Jamie Foxx performing it. That it looks deeper and gives us a sense of the man himself is what makes it special.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Dying is not this cheerful, but we need to think it is. The Barbarian Invasions is a movie about a man who dies about as pleasantly as it's possible to imagine; the audience sheds happy tears.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What's fascinating is the way Mario, working from his father's autobiography and his own memories, has somehow used his first-hand experience without being cornered by it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is Rourke doing astonishing physical acting.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The Leopard was written by the only man who could have written it, directed by the only man who could have directed it, and stars the only man who could have played its title character.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Andrea Yates believed she was possessed by Satan and could save her children by drowning them. Frailty is as chilling.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    McQueen is great in Bullitt, and the movie is great, because director Peter Yates understands the McQueen image and works within it. He winds up with about the best action movie of recent years.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is one of the best films of the year, an unflinching lament for the human condition.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    You may have heard that Lorenzo's Oil is a harrowing movie experience. It is, but in the best way. It takes a heartbreaking story and pushes it to the limit, showing us the lengths of courage and imagination that people can summon when they must.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A superb crime melodrama.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What we sense after the film is that the natural sources of pleasure have been replaced with higher-octane substitutes, which have burnt out the ability to feel joy.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    There is one cool, understated scene after another.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Ron Howard's film of this mission is directed with a single-mindedness and attention to detail that makes it riveting.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Haggis writes with such directness and such a good ear for everyday speech that the characters seem real and plausible after only a few words. His cast is uniformly strong; the actors sidestep cliches and make their characters particular.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is a dark, dark, dark film, focused on an obsession so complete and lonely it shuts out all other human experience. You may not savor it, but you will not stop watching it, in horror and fascination.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The movie is made with boundless energy. Fellini stood here at the dividing point between the neorealism of his earlier films (like "La Strada") and the carnival visuals of his extravagant later ones ("Juliet of the Spirits," "Amarcord'').
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The characters are played not by the first actors you would think of casting, but by actors who will prevent you from ever being able to imagine anyone else in their roles.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    If you are squeamish, here is the film to make you squeam.

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