For 4,075 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 75% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 23% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 House of Sand and Fog
Lowest review score: 0 I Spit on Your Grave
Score distribution:
4,075 movie reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What a magical movie.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The genius of the movie is the way is sidesteps all of the obvious cliches of the underlying story and makes itself fresh, observant, tough and genuinely moving.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    There has never been a movie quite like Northfork… The movie is visionary and elegiac, more a fable than a story, and frame by frame, it looks like a portfolio of spaces so wide, so open, that men must wonder if they have a role beneath such indifferent skies.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Lohman in particular is effective; I learn to my astonishment that she's 24, but here she plays a 15-year-old with all the tentative love and sudden vulnerability that the role requires, when your dad is a whacko confidence man.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    I loved this movie. I loved the way Coppola and her actors negotiated the hazards of romance and comedy, taking what little they needed and depending for the rest on the truth of the characters.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    To see strong acting like this is exhilarating. In a time of flashy directors who slice and dice their films in a dizzy editing rhythm, it is important to remember that films can look and listen and attentively sympathize with their characters. Directors grow great by subtracting, not adding, and Eastwood does nothing for show, everything for effect.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Kill Bill: Volume 1 shows Quentin Tarantino so effortlessly and brilliantly in command of his technique that he reminds me of a virtuoso violinist racing through "Flight of the Bumble Bee" -- or maybe an accordion prodigy setting a speed record for "Lady of Spain."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    You savor every moment of Jackie Brown. Those who say it is too long have developed cinematic attention deficit disorder. I wanted these characters to live, talk, deceive and scheme for hours and hours.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Bresson suggests that we are all Balthazars. Despite our dreams, hopes and best plans, the world will eventually do with us whatever it does.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It simply looks at the day as it unfolds, and that is a brave and radical act; it refuses to supply reasons and assign cures, so that we can close the case and move on.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Halloween is an absolutely merciless thriller...I would compare it to "Psycho."
    • Chicago Sun-Times
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Like the work of David Lean, it achieves the epic without losing sight of the human, and to see it is to be reminded of the way great action movies can rouse and exhilarate us, can affirm life instead of simply dramatizing its destruction.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Dying is not this cheerful, but we need to think it is. The Barbarian Invasions is a movie about a man who dies about as pleasantly as it's possible to imagine; the audience sheds happy tears.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    In America is not unsentimental about its new arrivals (the movie has a warm heart and frankly wants to move us), but it is perceptive about the countless ways in which it is hard to be poor and a stranger in a new land.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A quiet movie, shaken from time to time by ripples of emotional turbulence far beneath the surface.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    McNamara speaks concisely and forcibly, rarely searching for a word, and he is not reciting boilerplate and old sound bites; there is the uncanny sensation that he is thinking as he speaks.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It stands with integrity and breaks our hearts.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is one of the greatest performances in the history of the cinema.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The most harrowing movie about mountain climbing I have seen, or can imagine.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The film is extraordinarily beautiful. Bertolucci is one of the great painters of the screen.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    If I were asked to say with certainty which movies will still be widely known a century or two from now, I would list "2001,'' "The Wizard of Oz,'' Keaton and Chaplin, Astaire and Rogers, and probably "Casablanca'' ... and "Star Wars,'' for sure.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The most painful and heartrending portrait of jealousy in the cinema--an "Othello'' for our times.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is not a sermon or a homily, but a visualization of the central event in the Christian religion. Take it or leave it.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Wolfgang Petersen's direction is an exercise in pure craftsmanship. [Director's Cut]
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Like a flowering of talent that has been waiting so long to be celebrated. It is also one of the most touching and moving of the year's films.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    In the world of this film, conventional piety is overturned and we see into the soul of a human monster.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Plays like an anthology of the best parts from all the Saturday matinee serials ever made.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The patter is always fascinating, and at right angles to the action. [Mamet]'s like a magician who gets you all involved in his story about the King, the Queen and the Jack, while the whole point is that there's a rabbit in your pocket.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    LaBute's "Your Friends and Neighbors'' is to "In the Company of Men'' as Quentin Tarantino's "Pulp Fiction'' was to "Reservoir Dogs.'' In both cases, the second film reveals the full scope of the talent, and the director, given greater resources, paints what he earlier sketched.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Duvall's screenplay does what great screenwriting is supposed to do, and surprises us with additional observations and revelations in every scene.

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