For 4,071 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 75% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 23% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 A Prophet
Lowest review score: 0 Police Academy
Score distribution:
4,071 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Once again, [Cameron] has silenced the doubters by simply delivering an extraordinary film. There is still at least one man in Hollywood who knows how to spend $250 million, or was it $300 million, wisely.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Jeff Bridges is a virtual certainty to win his first Oscar, after four nominations.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Up in the Air takes the trust people once had in their jobs and pulls out the rug. It is a film for this time.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This happens in 1961, when 16-year-old girls were a great deal less knowing than they are now. Yet the movie isn't shabby or painful, but romantic and wonderfully entertaining.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Sometimes two performances come along that are so perfectly matched that no overt signals are needed to show how the characters feel about each other. That's what happens between Melissa Leo and Misty Upham in Frozen River.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A great film, an intelligent film, a film shot clearly so that we know exactly who everybody is and where they are and what they’re doing and why.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The film is visually masterful. It's in black and white, of course.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Arnold deserves comparison with a British master director like Ken Loach.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A great American film.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    No one is better at this kind of performance than Nicolas Cage. He's a fearless actor. He doesn't care if you think he goes over the top. If a film calls for it, he will crawl to the top hand over hand with bleeding fingernails.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Have I mentioned A Serious Man is so rich and funny? This isn't a laugh-laugh movie, but a wince-wince movie. Those can be funny too.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is astonishingly original.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A voluptuary of a film, drunk on primary colors, caressing Penelope Cruz, using the devices of a Hitchcock to distract us with surfaces while the sinister uncoils beneath. As it ravished me, I longed for a freeze frame to allow me to savor a shot.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A big, bold, audacious war movie that will annoy some, startle others and demonstrate once again that he’s (Tarantino) the real thing, a director of quixotic delights.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is a powerful film and a stark visual accomplishment, but no thanks to Gabita (Laura Vasiliu). The driving character is her roommate Otilia (Anamaria Marinca), who does all the heavy lifting.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    If you have never seen a single film by Agnes Varda, perhaps it is best to start with The Beaches of Agnes.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    One of the greatest of all fantasy films.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Here is a rare movie that begins by telling us how it will end and is about how the hero has no idea why.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Up
    This is another masterwork from Pixar, which is leading the charge in modern animation.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    [An] extraordinary documentary, nothing at all like what I was expecting to see. Here is not a sick and drugged man forcing himself through grueling rehearsals, but a spirit embodied by music. Michael Jackson was something else.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    There is a word to describe Ponyo, and that word is magical. This poetic, visually breathtaking work by the greatest of all animators has such deep charm that adults and children will both be touched.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    As Soderbergh lovingly peels away veil after veil of deception, the film develops into an unexpected human comedy. Not that any of the characters are laughing.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The characters are played not by the first actors you would think of casting, but by actors who will prevent you from ever being able to imagine anyone else in their roles.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    "Batman" isn't a comic book anymore. Christopher Nolan's The Dark Knight is a haunted film that leaps beyond its origins and becomes an engrossing tragedy. It creates characters we come to care about. That's because of the performances, because of the direction, because of the writing, and because of the superlative technical quality of the entire production.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The movie is bursting with life, energy, fears, frustrations and the quick laughter of a classroom hungry for relief.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The impersonation of Welles by Christian McKay in Me and Orson Welles is the centerpiece of the film, and from it, all else flows. We can almost accept that this is the Great Man.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Many of the scenes in No Country for Old Men are so flawlessly constructed that you want them to simply continue, and yet they create an emotional suction drawing you to the next scene. Another movie that made me feel that way was "Fargo." To make one such film is a miracle. Here is another.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Gomorrah looks grimy and sullen, and has no heroes, only victims. That is its power.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Who is Charles Ferguson, director of this film? A one-time senior fellow of the Brookings Institute, software millionaire, originally a supporter of the war, visiting professor at MIT and Berkeley, he was trustworthy enough to inspire confidences from former top officials.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It's a compelling visceral film -- sound, images and characters combined into a decidedly odd visual experience that evokes the feel of a graphic novel. It seems charged from within by its power as a fable; we sense it’s not interested in a plot so much as with the dilemma of functioning in a world losing hope.