For 4,399 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 74% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 24% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Gone with the Wind
Lowest review score: 0 September Dawn
Score distribution:
4399 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Part of the greatness of this film is that it not only avoids any simple answers, but it also takes us into the awkward contradictions and internal dishonesties that help us look at the mirror each day.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    To be fair, this tawdry dose of pulp fiction ("inspired by real events") is not a complete waste of time. It offers the marginal pleasure of an all-star cast slumming their way through a thicket of routine plotting, almost laughable dialogue and the constant blaze of tommy guns.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    An unexpected kind of masterpiece by Haneke, whose films have included the enigmatic "Caché" and the earlier Golden Palm winner "The White Ribbon." We don't expect such unflinching seriousness, such profundity from Haneke.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What Tarantino has is an appreciation for gut-level exploitation film appeal, combined with an artist's desire to transform that gut element with something higher, better, more daring. His films challenge taboos in our society in the most direct possible way, and at the same time add an element of parody or satire.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Do we want to know more about Osama bin Laden and al Qaida and the history and political grievances behind them? Yes, but that's not how things turned out. Sorry, but there you have it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Here is a searing film of human tragedy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is a sweet, bittersweet comedy, well-executed if perhaps a little heavy on anecdotage. You know who might have made it in the old days? I kept thinking of Woody Allen. You don't know what you want. Woody knows what you want.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This isn't a serious historical film. It plays different instruments than Spielberg's "Lincoln." Murray, who has a wider range than we sometimes realize, finds the human core of this FDR and presents it tenderly.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Jessica Biel all but steals the show as Stacie.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Generation P appears to be Russian slang for Generation Perestroika and "The Pepsi Generation," which nicely reflects this film's cockamamie spirit, sort of a cross between "Mad Men" and an acid trip.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    I don't believe New Jerusalem takes a position in favor of either character. It's more of an intense study of these two men and their barren work in a shabby store by the side of a highway.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The film itself deserves praise for its portraits of these two women and the different worlds they inhabit.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The case transfixed a racially polarized New York City. The teens were labeled as a "wolf pack" by the news media, led by the New York tabloids.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    This is a basic story, simply and directly told by Irish writer-director Ciaran Foy. He doesn't try to explain too much, he doesn't depend on special effects and stays just this side of the unbelievable.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Fat Kid Rules the World is a movie with a title that might be misleading: It's a lot better than it sounds like it has any right to be.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    What she hasn't done is make a terrifically entertaining film. Although this version dumps many of the novel's passages, particularly from the later chapters, it's dreary and slow-paced, heavy on atmosphere, introverted. I suppose life on an isolated moor was like that at the time, but do we need this much atmosphere?
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The charisma of such actors as Gandolfini, Pitt, Liotta and Jenkins depends largely on their screen presences and our memories of them in better roles.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A closing scene, rousingly patriotic, takes place back on the football field. I think I'm beginning to understand why the Chinese were not reckoned to be a prime market for this film.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Hitchcock tells the story not so much as the making of the film, but as the behind-the-scenes relationship of Alma and Hitch. This is a disappointment, since I imagine most movie fans will expect more info about the film's production history.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Is it real? Is this whole story real? I refuse to ask that question. Life of Pi is all real, second by second and minute by minute, and what it finally amounts to is left for every viewer to decide. I have decided it is one of the best films of the year.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    There's an audience for this film. It's not me. I gather younger children will like the breakneck action, the magical ability to fly and the young hero who has tired of only being a name. Their parents and older siblings may find the 89-minute running time quite long enough.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The film is intended for family audiences. It is so gentle and whimsical that one wonders if American children, accustomed to the whiz-bang action of most animation, will accept it. Maybe there would be hope for the younger ones - but what will they make of the subtitles?
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    This is a sumptuous film - extravagantly staged and photographed, perhaps too much so for its own good. There are times when it is not quite clear if we are looking at characters in a story or players on a stage. Productions can sometimes upstage a story, but when the story is as considerable as Anna Karenina, that can be a miscalculation.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    I suspect its audience, which takes these films very seriously indeed, will drink deeply of its blood. The sensational closing sequence cannot be accused of leaving a single loophole, not even some those we didn't know were there.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Heart-stopping in its coverage of the brave and risky attempt by a scientist named James Balog and his team of researchers on the Extreme Ice Survey, where "extreme" refers to their efforts almost more than to the ice.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Few actors have played a wider variety of characters, and even fewer have done it without making it seem like a stunt.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Given the grievousness of their sins, one wonders why the church continues to shelter them. Might it not be more appropriate to excommunicate them, and refer them to the attention of the civil authorities?
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    We're fully aware of the plot conventions at work here, the wheels and gears churning within the machinery, but with these actors, this velocity and the oblique economy of the dialogue, we realize we don't often see it done this well. Silver Linings Playbook is so good, it could almost be a terrific old classic.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Proves to be unsatisfactory because it establishes a well-defined group of characters and shows them disrupted by the careless behavior of a tiresome young woman and two adults who allow themselves to be motivated in one way or another by her infectious libido.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Although there are some scary moments here, and a lot of gruesome ones, this isn't a horror film so much as a faux eco-documentary.

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