For 4,070 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 75% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 23% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Lincoln
Lowest review score: 0 The Human Centipede II (Full Sequence)
Score distribution:
4,070 movie reviews
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There's a way to make a movie like The Tourist, but Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck doesn't find that way.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Nothing heats up. The movie doesn't lead us, it simply stays in step.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Here is an exercise in deliberate vulgarity, gross excess, and the pornography of violence, not to forget garden variety pornography. You get your money's worth.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I confess I felt involved in Unknown until it pulled one too many rabbits out of its hat. At some point, a thriller has to play fair.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is rated R, but it's the most watery R I've seen. It's more of a PG-13 playing dress-up.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    You know I am a fan of Nic Cage and Ron Perlman. Here, like cows, they devour the scenery, regurgitate it to a second stomach found only in actors and chew it as cud. It is a noble effort, but I prefer them in their straight-through Human Centipede mode.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    An intriguing plot is established, a new character is brought on with a complex set of problems, and then all the groundwork disintegrates into the usual hash of preposterous action sequences.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    All through the movie, Scream 4 lets us know that it knows exactly what it's up to - and then goes right ahead and gets up to it.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    All of the characters are treated sincerely and played in a straightforward style. It's just that we don't love them enough.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is fun until they set sail.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Is this some kind of a test? The Hangover, Part II plays like a challenge to the audience's capacity for raunchiness.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Give Shadyac credit: He sells his Pasadena mansion, starts teaching college and moves into a mobile home (in Malibu, it's true). Now he offers us this hopeful if somewhat undigested cut of his findings, in a film as watchable as a really good TV commercial, and just as deep.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Of these characters, the rival played by Lucy Punch is the most colorful, because she's the most driven and obsessed. The others seem curiously inconsequential, content to materialize in a scene, perform a necessary function and vaporize.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The screenplay carries blandness to a point beyond tedium.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It's chirpy, it's bright, there are pretty locations and lots happens. This is the kind of movie that can briefly hold the attention of a cat.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie's strategic error is to set the deadline too far in the future. There is something annoying about a comedy where a guy is strapped to a bomb and nevertheless has time to spare for off-topic shouting matches with his best buddy. A buddy comedy loses some of its charm in a situation like that.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    They (fans) know what they enjoy. They don't want no damn movies with damn surprises. I am always pleased when moviegoers have a good time; perhaps they will return to a theater and someday see a good movie by accident, and it will start them thinking.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Although Jack Kerouac's On the Road has been praised as a milestone in American literature, this film version brings into question how much of a story it really offers.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Texas Killing Fields begins along the lines of a police procedural and might have been perfectly absorbing if it had played by the rules: strict logic, attention to detail, reference to technical police work. Unfortunately, the movie often seems to stray from such discipline.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    When I heard that John Cusack had been cast for this film, it sounded like good news: I could imagine him as Poe, tortured and brilliant, lashing out at a cruel world. But that isn't the historical Poe the movie has in mind. It is a melodramatic Poe, calling for the gifts of Nicolas Cage.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A home invasion thriller that may set a record for the number of times the characters point loaded pistols at one another's heads. First we're afraid somebody will get shot. Then we're afraid nobody will be.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I'm all for movies that create unease, but I prefer them to appear to know why they're doing that. Super is a film ending in narrative anarchy, exercising a destructive impulse to no greater purpose than to mess with us.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A film that little kids might find perfectly acceptable. Little, little, little kids. My best guess is, above fourth-grade level, you'd be pushing it.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Contraband is based on an Icelandic thriller named "Reykjavik-Rotterdam," which leads you to suspect that neither New Orleans nor Panama City is particularly essential to the plot. That film starred Baltasar Kormakur, who is the director of this one, perhaps as a demonstration that many stars believe they could direct this crap themselves if they ever had the chance.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Reeves has many arrows in his quiver, but screwball comedy isn't one of them.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    This question, which will instinctively occur to many viewers, is never quite dealt with in the film. The photographers sometimes drive into the middle of violent situations, hold up a camera, and say "press!" - as if that will solve everything.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Watching this film was a cheerless exercise for me. The characters are manic and idiotic, the dialogue is rat-a-tat chatter, the action is entirely at the service of the 3-D, and the movie depends on bright colors, lots of noise and a few songs in between the whiplash moments.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Wrath of the Titans relentlessly wore me down with special effects so overscale compared to the characters in the film that at times the only thing to do was grin.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Soppy and sentimental, it evokes "Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood" without improving on it.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Each scene works within itself on its own terms. But there is no whole here. I've rarely seen a narrative film that seemed so reluctant to flow. Nor perhaps one with a more accurate title.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie cuts back and forth between two preposterous plot lines and uses the man on the ledge as a device to pump up the tension.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The result is a tiresome exercise that circles at great length through various prefabricated stories defined by the advice each couple needs (or doesn't need).
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Unfortunately, I was also convinced that trapped within this 98-minute film is a good 30-minute news report struggling to get out. Shearer, who is bright and funny, comes across here as a solemn lecturer.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Seems curiously unfinished, as if director John Landis spent all his energy on spectacular set pieces and then didn't want to bother with things like transitions, character development, or an ending.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Jessica Biel all but steals the show as Stacie.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There is nothing to complain about except the film's deadening predictability and the bland, shallow characters.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    You have to be very talented to work with Meryl Streep. It also helps to know how to use her. The Iron Lady fails in both of these categories.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    He seems fueled more by anger and ego than spirituality and essentially abandons his family to play with his guns. It's intriguing, however, how well Butler enlists our sympathy for the character.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Here's a bad movie with hardly a bad scene. How can that be? The construction doesn't flow. The story doesn't engage. The insistent flashbacks are distracting. The plot has problems it sidesteps. Yet here is a gifted cast doing what it's asked to do. The failure is in the writing and editing.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It's so determined to be crude, vulgar and offensive that after a while I grew weary. Abbott and Costello used to knock out funnier movies on this exact intellectual plane without using a single F, S, C, P or A word.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie was directed by Michael Brandt, who co-wrote the script with Derek Haas. Together they wrote a much better movie, "3:10 to Yuma." The Double doesn't approach it in terms of quality. None of it is particularly compelling.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Did I care if Largo Winch won his struggle for control of Winch International? Not at all. Did I care about him? No, because all of his action and dialogue were shunted into narrow corridors of movie formulas.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The first-time director is Mateo Gil, known for the screenplays of "Open Your Eyes," "The Sea Inside" and "Agora." Ironic, that the film's weakness is its screenplay.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The screenplay shows signs of being inspired by personal memories that still hurt and are still piling up in Michael's mind. Fair enough, but the film doesn't sort this out clearly, and we experience vignettes in search of a story arc.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    OK, OK. They're good dancers, and well-choreographed. You can see the movie for that and be charitable about the moronic plot.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    To be fair, this tawdry dose of pulp fiction ("inspired by real events") is not a complete waste of time. It offers the marginal pleasure of an all-star cast slumming their way through a thicket of routine plotting, almost laughable dialogue and the constant blaze of tommy guns.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is probably ideal for those proverbial young girls who adore cats, and young boys, too. I can't recommend it for adults attending on their own, unless they really, really love cats.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Now let me ask you: Can you think of any reason the character John Miller is needed to tell his story? Was any consideration given to the possibility of a Chinese priest? Would that be asking for too much?
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Both the lottery scene and the anti-union material seem to be fictionalized versions of material in the powerful documentary "Waiting for Superman," which covered similar material with infinitely greater depth.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    My attention was held for the first act or so. Then any attempt at realism was abandoned, and it became clear that the house, and the movie containing it, were devices to manufacture methodical thrills. The explanation, if that's what it was, seemed contrived and unconvincing.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is only 84 minutes long, including credit cookies, but that is quite long enough. All the same, it's fitfully amusing and I have the sense that Spanish-speaking audiences will like it more than I did, although whether they'll be laughing with it or at it, I cannot say.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A disjointed thriller with two many characters rattling around.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The charisma of such actors as Gandolfini, Pitt, Liotta and Jenkins depends largely on their screen presences and our memories of them in better roles.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    October Baby is being promoted as a Christian film, and it could have been an effective one. Rachel Hendrix is surprisingly capable in her first feature role, and Jasmine Guy is superb in her scene. Unfortunately, the film as a whole is amateurish and ungainly, can't find a consistent tone, is too long, is overladen with music that tries to paraphrase the story and is photographed with too many beauty shots that slow the progress.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The performances by Miller and Graynor are high-spirited enough that you yearn to see them in worthier material. The potential is there. If there's anything more seductive to Manhattanites than sex, it's a cheap apartment overlooking Gramercy Park.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    High School is a pun. Get it? This is one of those stoner comedies that may be funny if you're high - but if not, not.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Here is a film that begins with merciless comic savagery and descends into merely merciless savagery. But wow, what an opening.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The surprise for me is Christina Ricci, who I think of as undernourished and nervous, but who flowers here in warm ripeness.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Watching the movie, I enjoyed the settings, the periods and the acting. I can't go so far as to say I cared about the story, particularly after it became clear that its structure was too clever by half.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The plot, in short, is underwhelming. It merely follows the reporters as the screenplay serves them the solution to their case on a silver platter. Yet curiously, Deadline flows right along.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Beloved evokes some of the fine moments in the careers of Deneuve and Marcello Mastroianni, but it doesn't re-create them.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The Higgins performance owes more than a little to Fred Willard's unforgettable dog show commentary in "Best in Show," but it was clear that Willard was part of a telecast.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Its characters are bloodless, their speech monotone. If there are people like this, I hope David Cronenberg's film is as close as I ever get to them. You couldn't pay me to see it again.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It isn't a great movie, but it looks terrific and makes me look forward to the next film by its director, David Ren. He has a good eye.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A Burning Hot Summer failed to persuade me of any reason for its existence.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Proves to be unsatisfactory because it establishes a well-defined group of characters and shows them disrupted by the careless behavior of a tiresome young woman and two adults who allow themselves to be motivated in one way or another by her infectious libido.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    All of this grows tiresome. We're given no particular reason at the outset of The Loneliest Planet to care about these people, our interest doesn't grow along the way, the landscape grows repetitive, the director's approach is aggressively minimalist, and if you ask me, this romance was not made in heaven.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The film is not a compelling drama so much as a poignant observation of a sad situation.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A mushy and limp musical fantasy, so insubstantial it keeps evaporating before our eyes. It's one of those rare movies in which every scene seems to be the final scene; it's all ends and no beginnings, right up to its actual end, which is a cheat.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Kafka, as subject or character, simply doesn't fit into the world of this film. Soderbergh does demonstrate again here that he's a gifted director, however unwise in his choice of project.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    "Star Trek V" is pretty much of a mess - a movie that betrays all the signs of having gone into production at a point where the script doctoring should have begun in earnest. There is no clear line from the beginning of the movie to the end, not much danger, no characters to really care about, little suspense, uninteresting or incomprehensible villains, and a great deal of small talk and pointless dead ends. Of all of the "Star Trek" movies, this is the worst.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Here is a movie so concerned with in-jokes and updates for Trekkers that it can barely tear itself away long enough to tell a story. From the weight and attention given to the transfer of command on the Starship Enterprise, you'd think a millennium was ending - which is, by the end of the film, how it feels.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    As an achievement, Computer Chess is laudable. As a film, it's missable.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    This is Spielberg's weakest film since "1941."
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Poignancy. Lessons to be learned. Speeches to be made. Lost marbles to be rediscovered. Tears to be shed. The conclusion of Hook would be embarrassingly excessive even for a movie in which something of substance had gone before.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I suppose there is a market for this sort of thing among bubblebrained adolescents of all ages, but it takes a good chase scene indeed to rouse me from the lethargy induced by dozens and dozens of essentially similar sequences.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    I think the fault is in the screenplay, which tells a story that can be predicted almost from the opening frames. The people who wrote this movie did not bother, or dare, to give us truly individual Japanese characters; there is only one who is developed with any care.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    John Carpenter's Prince of Darkness gets off to an intriguing start. But then the movie loses its way.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is simply a failure of imagination. Nobody looked at the screenplay and observed that it didn’t try hard enough, that it had no surprises, that it didn’t attempt to delight its audiences with twists and turns on the phoned-in plotline.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There should be a special category for movies that are neither good nor bad, but simply excessive.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The special effects are all there, nicely in place, and the production values are sound, but the movie is dead in the water. It tells an amazing and preposterous story, and it seems bored by it.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It's strange about Stir Crazy. We go in with big expectations, and we laugh so much at the beginning that we're ready for the movie to launch itself as a hit. And then it all goes flat and we come out disappointed.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Timecop, a low-rent "Terminator," is the kind of movie that is best not thought about at all, for that way madness lies.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A deplorable film with this message: If you're a 14-year-old girl who has been brutally raped and murdered by a serial killer, you have a lot to look forward to.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Everybody knew to wait for the outtakes during the closing credits, because you'd see him miss a fire escape or land wrong in the truck going under the bridge. Now the outtakes involve his use of the English language.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    What possible reason was there for anyone to make Did You Hear About the Morgans? Or should I say "remake," because this movie has been made and over and over again, and oh, so much better.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A lot of the dialogue is intended as funny, but man, is it lame.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The screenplay by Kim Barker requires Bullock to behave in an essentially disturbing way that began to wear on me. It begins as merely peculiar, moves on to miscalculation and becomes seriously annoying.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The Fourth Kind is a pseudo-documentary like "Paranormal Activity" and "The Blair Witch Project." But unlike those two, which just forge ahead with their home video cameras, this one encumbers its flow with ceaseless reminders that it is a dramatization of real events.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie is set up as a valentine to Vardalos. She should try sending herself flowers.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie has good special effects and suitably gruesome characters, but it's bloodless.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Tells the story of a violent sociopath. Since it's about golf, that makes it a comedy.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Certainly better than "Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen." How so? Admittedly, it doesn't have as much cleavage. But the high-tech hardware is more fun to look at than the transforming robots, the plot is as preposterous, and although the noise is just as loud, it's more the deep bass rumbles of explosions than the ear-piercing bang of steel robots pounding on each other.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Plays like a collision between leftover bits and pieces of Marvel superhero stories. It can't decide what tone to strike.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Strange, that movies about Satan always require Catholics. You never see your Presbyterians or Episcopalians hurling down demons.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    What we basically have here is a license for the filmmakers to do whatever they want to do with the special effects, while the plot, like Wile E. Coyote, keeps running into the wall.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A classic species of bore: a self-referential movie with no self to refer to. One character after another, one scene after another, one cute line of dialogue after another, refers to another movie, a similar character, a contrasting image, or whatever.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It's unnecessary in the sense that there is no good reason to go and actually see it.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    At some point during the pitch meetings for D.E.B.S. someone must certainly have used the words "Charlie's Lesbians."
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    House of D is the kind of movie that particularly makes me cringe, because it has such a shameless desire to please; like Uriah Heep, it bows and scrapes and wipes its sweaty palm on its trouser leg, and also like Uriah Heep, it privately thinks it is superior.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Obviously made with all of the best will in the world, its heart in the right place, this is a sluggish and dutiful film that plays more like a eulogy than an adventure.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Jiminy Glick needs definition if he's to work as a character. We have to sense a consistent comic personality, and we don't; Short changes gears and redefines the character whenever he needs a laugh.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The kind of movie that would be so bad it's good, except it's not bad enough to be good enough.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Stealth is an offense against taste, intelligence and the noise pollution code -- a dumbed-down "Top Gun" crossed with the HAL 9000 plot from "2001."
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Nobody needed to make it, nobody needs to see it, Jackson and Levy are too successful to waste time with it. It plays less like a film than like a deal.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A tedious exercise in style, intended as a meditation on guns and violence in America but more of a meditation on itself, the kind of meditation that invites the mind to stray.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    There must be humor here somewhere.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The Legend of Zorro commits a lot of movie sins, but one is mortal: It turns the magnificent Elena into a nag.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A movie that filled me with an urgent desire to see Sarah Silverman in a different movie. I liked everything about it except the writing, the direction, the editing and the lack of a parent or adult guardian.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    There's not a moment in this story arc that is not predictable.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Boring, repetitive and maddening about a subject you'd think would be fairly interesting: snowboarding down a mountain.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Pretty much a mess of a movie; the acting is overwrought, the plot is too tangled to play like anything BUT a plot, and although I know you can create terrific special effects at home in the basement on your computer, the CGI work in this movie looks like it was done with a dial-up connection.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It is the anti-Sundance film, an exhausted wheeze of bankrupt cliches and cardboard characters, the kind of film that has no visible reason for existing, except that everybody got paid.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    At every moment in the movie, I was aware that Peter Sellers was Clouseau, and Steve Martin was not. I hadn't realized how thoroughly Sellers and Edwards had colonized my memory.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It is not faulty logic that derails The Hills have Eyes, however, but faulty drama. The movie is a one-trick pony.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It's a lot of things, but boring is not one of them. I cannot recommend the movie, but ... why the hell can't I? Just because it's godawful? What kind of reason is that for staying away from a movie? Godawful and boring, that would be a reason.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Although I did not understand the story, I would have appreciated a great deal less explanation. All through the movie, characters are pausing in order to offer arcane back-stories and historical perspectives and metaphysical insights and occult orientations. They talk and talk and somehow their words do not light up any synapses in my brain.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Hoot has its heart in the right place, but I have been unable to locate its brain.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It takes some doing to make a Jack Black comedy that doesn't work. But Nacho Libre does it.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    There are few things more depressing than a weeper that doesn't make you weep.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Is there another great modern writer so hard to translate successfully into cinema? Saul Bellow? Again, it's all in the language. The only thing Saul and Gabo have in common is the Nobel Prize. Now that's interesting.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The film is a sharp disappointment to those who have been waiting for 10 years since the master's last film. The best that can be hoped is that, having made a film, Coppola has the taste again, and will go on to make many more, nothing like this.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Mad Money is astonishingly casual for a movie about three service workers who steal millions from a Federal Reserve Bank. There is little suspense, no true danger; their plan is simple, the complications are few, and they don't get excited much beyond some high-fives and hugs and giggles.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie deserves more stars for its bottom-line craft, but all the craft in the world can't redeem its story.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    In Step Brothers, the language is simply showing off by talking dirty. It serves no comic function, and just sort of sits there in the air, making me cringe.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    If you walk out after 10 or 15 minutes, you will have seen the best parts of the film.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Basically just a 98-minute trailer for the autumn launch of a new series on the Cartoon Network.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie attempts to jerk tears with one clunky device after another, in a plot that is a perfect storm of cliche and contrivance. In fact, it even contains a storm -- an imperfect one.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Blindness is one of the most unpleasant, not to say unendurable, films I've ever seen.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Its primary flaw is that it's not critical. It is a celebration of an idiotic lifestyle, and I don't think it knows it.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The Perfect Sleep puts me in mind of a flywheel spinning in the void. It is all burnished brass and shining steel, perfectly balanced as it hums in its orbit; yet, because it occupies a void, it satisfies only itself and touches nothing else. Here is a movie that goes about its business without regard for an audience.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    I admire the craft involved, but the movie leaves me profoundly indifferent. After three earlier movies in the series, which have been transmuted into video games, why do we need a fourth one? Oh. I just answered my own question.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Oh, did I dislike this film. It made me squirm. Its premise is lame, its plot relentlessly predictable, its characters with personalities that would distinguish picture books.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Rarely has a film centered on a character so superficial and unconvincing, played with such unrelenting sameness. I didn't hate it so much as feel sorry for it.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    If you're a fan of extreme skateboarding, motorcycling and motocross, this is the movie for you. If not, not. And even if you are, what's in the film other than what you might have seen on TV? Yes, it's in 3D, which adds nothing and dims the picture.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Why, oh, why, was this movie necessary?
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie is silly beyond comprehension, and even if it weren't silly, it would still be beyond comprehension.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A film overgrown with so many directorial flourishes that the heroes need machetes to hack their way to within view of the audience.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    There is some dark humor in the movie, of the kind where you laugh that you may not gag.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    There's nothing wrong with Fast Food Fast Women that a casting director and a rewrite couldn't have fixed.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A first draft for a movie that could have been extraordinary.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    I seem to be developing a rule about talking animals: They can talk if they're cartoons or Muppets, but not if they're real.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    (Li)'s scenes are so clearly computer-aided that his moves are about as impressive as Bugs Bunny doing the same.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    When flashbacks tease us with bits of information, it has to be done well, or we feel toyed with. Here the mystery is solved by stomping in thick-soled narrative boots through the squishy marsh of contrivance.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie never takes off; it's a bright idea the filmmakers were unable to breathe life into.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A long slog through perplexities and complexities.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It's nice, but it's not much of a comedy.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The Crew is all contrivance and we don't believe a minute of it.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie doesn't know how odd it seems to cut from the bloodshed in the ring to the dialogue of the supporting players, who still think they're in a comedy.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    There must still be a kind of moony young adolescent girl for which this film would be enormously appealing, if television has not already exterminated the domestic example of that species.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    So unsuccessful in so many different ways that maybe the whole project was doomed.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    An uninspired assembly of characters and story lines that interrupt one another.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The first All Talking Killer picture. After the setup, it consists mostly of characters explaining their actions to one another.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie is a paid holiday for its director, Harold Becker. I say this because I know what Becker is capable of.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A film so amateurish that only the professionalism of some of the actors makes it watchable.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Emma writes everything down and then offers helpful suggestions, although she fails to supply the most useful observation of all, which would be to observe that the entire novel is complete crap.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A painfully stolid movie that lumbers past emotional issues like a wrestler in a cafeteria line, putting a little of everything on his plate.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    I went to Crossroads expecting a glitzy bimbofest and got the bimbos but not the fest. Britney Spears' feature debut is curiously low-key and even sad.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It's a simple, wholesome parable, crashingly obvious, and we sit patiently while the characters and the screenplay slowly arrive at the inevitable conclusion. It needs to take some chances and surprise us.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The plot was an arbitrary concoction.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    There is nothing funny about the situation in Teaching Mrs. Tingle.
    • 14 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Dungeons & Dragons looks like they threw away the game and photographed the box it came in.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Plays like a tired exercise, a spy spoof with no burning desire to be that, or anything else.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Opens with 15 funny minutes and then goes dead in the water.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It's surprising to see a director like Michael Apted and an actress like Jennifer Lopez associated with such tacky material.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It's got cheesy special effects, a muddy visual look, and characters who say obvious things in obvious ways.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Thin and unsatisfying.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The astonishing success of the original "MiB" was partly because it was fun, partly because it was unexpected. We'd never seen anything like it, while with MiBII, we've seen something exactly like it.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A big, ugly, ungainly device to give teenagers the impression they are seeing a movie.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Movies like this demonstrate that when it comes to stupidity and vulgarity, only the best will do for our children.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It's the most lugubrious and soppy love story in many a moon, a step backward for director Sam Raimi after "A Simple Plan."
    • 21 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Here's a movie without an ounce of human kindness, a sour and mean-spirited enterprise so desperate to please, it tries to be a yukky comedy and a hard-boiled action picture at the same time.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie is an invaluable experiment in the theory of cinema, because it demonstrates that a shot-by-shot remake is pointless; genius apparently resides between or beneath the shots, or in chemistry that cannot be timed or counted.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It involves teenagers who have never existed, doing things no teenager has ever done, for reasons no teenager would understand. Of course, it's aimed at the teenage market.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The photography, the dialogue, the acting, the script, the special effects and especially the props (such as a spaceship that looks like it would get a D in shop class) are all deliberately bad in the way that such films were bad when they were REALLY being made.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Regaled for 50 years by the stupendous idiocy of the American version of Godzilla, audiences can now see the original Japanese version, which is equally idiotic.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    [Figgis] has made a thriller that thrills us only if we abandon all common sense. Of course preposterous things happen in all thrillers, but there must be at least a gesture in the direction of plausibility, or we lose patience.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It is a thriller trapped inside a pop comedy set in Japan, and gives Reno a chirpy young co-star who bounces around him like a puppy on visiting day at the drunk tank.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    I am just about ready to write off movies in which people make bets about whether they will, or will not, fall in love.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    What Raising Arizona needs more than anything else is more velocity. Here's a movie that stretches out every moment for more than it's worth, until even the moments of inspiration seem forced.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Another one of those road comedies where Southern roots are supposed to make boring people seem colorful. If these characters were from Minneapolis or Denver, no way anyone would make a film about them.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Lumbering from one expensive set piece to the next without taking the time to tell us a story that might make us care.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A march through the swamp of recycled ugly duckling stories, with occasional pauses in the marsh of sitcom cliches and the bog of Idiot Plots.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie adds up to a few good ideas and a lot of bad ones, wandering around in search of an organizing principle.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Bootmen is the story of a young dancer and his friends who revisit the cliches of countless other dance movies in order to bring forth a dance performance of clanging unloveliness.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A slick production of a lame script, which kills time for most of its middle half-hour. If anyone in the plot had the slightest intelligence, the story would implode.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Robert Rodriguez has somehow misplaced his energy, his flair and his humor in this third film, which is a flat and dreary disappointment.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Even with Cecil B. Demented, which fails on just about every level, you've got to hand it to him (Waters): The idea for the film is kind of inspired.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Rubber-stamped from the same mold that has produced an inexhaustible supply of fictional Southern belles who drink too much, talk too much, think about themselves too much, try too hard to be the most unforgettable character you've ever met, and are, in general, insufferable.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A witless recycling of the H.G. Wells story from 1895, with the absurdity intact but the wonderment missing.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    There are those who will no doubt call The Postman the worst film of the year, but it's too good-hearted for that.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Walks like a thriller and talks like a thriller, but it squawks like a turkey.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The plot risks bursting under the strain of its coincidences, as Sara and Jon fly to opposite coasts at the same time and engage in a series of Idiot Plot moves so extreme and wrongheaded that even other characters in the same scene should start shouting helpful suggestions.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    I laughed, yes, I did, several times during Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo. That's proof, if any is required, that I still possess streaks of immaturity and vulgarity.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Perhaps movies are like history, and repeat themselves, first as tragedy, then as farce.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The kind of movie beloved by people who never go to the movies, because they are primarily interested in something else--the Civil War, for example--and think historical accuracy is a virtue instead of an attribute.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    "Clerks" spoke with the sure, clear voice of an original filmmaker. In Mallrats the voice is muffled, and we sense instead advice from the tired, the establishment, the timid and other familiar Hollywood executive types.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    An earnest but hopeless attempt to tell a parable about a man's search for redemption. By the end of his journey, we don't care if he finds redemption, if only he finds wakefulness.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Tucker's scenes finally wear us down. How can a movie allow him to be so obnoxious and make no acknowledgment that his behavior is aberrant?
    • 77 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    To the degree that you will want to see this movie, it will be because of the surprise, and so I will say no more, except to say that the "solution," when it comes, solves little - unless there is really little to solve, which is also a possibility.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Big Daddy should be reported to the child welfare office.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Jogs doggedly on the treadmill of comedy, working up a sweat but not getting much of anywhere.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A watered-down take on the sci-fi classic "Solaris," by Stanislaw Lem, which was made into an immeasurably better film by Andrei Tarkovsky.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It knows the words but not the music; while the Farrelly brothers got away with murder, The Sweetest Thing commits suicide.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A labored and sour comedy.
    • 6 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Bad films are easy to make, but a film as unpleasant as Baby Geniuses' achieves a kind of grandeur.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Here is a film so dreary and conventional that it took an act of the will to keep me in the theater.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    An innocuous family feature that's too little/too late in the fast-moving world of feature animation.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    If there's anything worse than a movie hammered together out of pieces of bad screenplays, it's a movie made from the scraps of good ones.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Very seriously confused in its objectives.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It's a nine days' wonder, a geek show designed to win a weekend or two at the box office and then fade from memory.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    How could director Lawrence Kasdan and writer William Goldman be responsible for a film that goes so awesomely wrong?
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    I couldn't believe a moment of it, and never identified with little David.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Plays like a genial amateur theatrical, the kind of production where you'd like it more if you were friends with the cast. The plot is creaky, the jokes are laborious, and total implausibility is not considered the slightest problem.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The average issue of Mad magazine contains significantly smarter movie satire, because Mad goes for the vulnerable elements and Scary Movie 3 just wants to quote and kid.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A movie like this is harmless, I suppose, except for the celluloid that was killed in the process of its manufacture, but as an entertainment, it will send the kids tiptoeing through the multiplex to sneak into "Spider-Man 2."
    • 24 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    There's no chemistry between Deeds and Babe, but then how could there be, considering that their characters have no existence, except as the puppets in scenes of plot manipulation.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Would it have been that much more difficult to make a movie in which Tom and Sarah were plausible, reasonably articulate newlyweds with the humor on their honeymoon growing out of situations we could believe? Apparently.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Starts promisingly as an attack on modern commercialized sports, and then turns into just one more wheezy assembly-line story about slacker dudes vs. rich old guys.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The kind of movie that somehow succeeds in moving very, very slowly even while proceeding at a breakneck pace. It cuts quickly back and forth between nothing and nothing.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The kind of movie Mad magazine prays for. It is so earnest, so overwrought and so wildly implausible that it begs to be parodied.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    This is not the story of a fugitive trying to sneak through enemy terrain and be rescued, but of a movie character magically transported from one photo opportunity to another.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Joe Dirt is so obviously a construction that it is impossible to find anything human about him; he is a concept, not a person.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The events involving the big speaking competition are so labored that occasionally the twins seem to be looking back over their shoulders for the plot to catch up.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Made me want to spray the screen with Lysol. This movie is shameless. It's not merely a tearjerker. It extracts tears individually by liposuction, without anesthesia.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie offers brainless high-tech action without interesting dialogue, characters, motivation or texture.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Its centerpiece is 40 minutes of redundant special effects, surrounded by a love story of stunning banality.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Did you (Garry Marshall) deliberately assemble this movie from off-the-shelf parts or did it just happen that way? The film is like a homage to the cliches and obligatory stereotypes of its genre.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    There is a kind of studied stupidity that sometimes passes as humor, and Jared Hess' Napoleon Dynamite pushes it as far as it can go.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A mess. It lacks the sharp narrative line and crisp comic-book clarity of the earlier films, and descends too easily into shapeless fight scenes that are chopped into so many cuts that they lack all form or rhythm.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    As for Shaquille O'Neal, given his own three wishes the next time, he should go for a script, a director and an interesting character.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie makes two mistakes: (1) It isn't very funny, and (2) it makes the crucial error of taking its story seriously and angling for a happy ending.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    This is a surprisingly cheesy disaster epic.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    This is a repetitive, pointless exercise in genre filmmaking--the kind of movie where you distract yourself by making a list of the sources.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The Jackal, on the other hand, impressed me with its absurdity. There was scarcely a second I could take seriously.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The film is a gloomy special-effects extravaganza filled with grotesque images, generating fear and despair.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The characters are bitter and hateful, the images are nauseating, and the ending is bleak enough that when the screen fades to black it's a relief.. Videodrome, whatever its qualities, has got to be one of the least entertaining films of all time.
    • Chicago Sun-Times
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie pretends to show poor black kids being bribed into literacy by Dylan and candy bars, but actually it is the crossover white audience that is being bribed with mind-candy in the form of safe words by the two Dylans.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Dead Man is a strange, slow, unrewarding movie that provides us with more time to think about its meaning than with meaning.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    If the movie is a lost cause, it may at least showcase actors who have better things ahead of them.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The Flower of My Secret is likely to be disappointing to Almodovar's admirers, and inexplicable to anyone else.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    [Robin Williams] has been ill-served by a screenplay that isn't curious about what his life would really be like.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    If Flashdance had spent just a little more effort getting to know the heroine of its story, and a little less time trying to rip off "Saturday Night Fever," it might have been a much better film.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Porky's is another raunchy teenage sex-and-food-fight movie.
    • 5 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    This movie should have been struck by a lightning bolt.
    • 14 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Maybe there's too much talent. Every character shines with such dazzling intensity and such inexhaustible comic invention that the movie becomes tiresome, like too many clowns.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The director is James Foley, who is obviously not right for this material.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Newsies is like warmed-over Horatio Alger, complete with such indispensable cliches as the newsboy on crutches, the little kid, and of course the hero's best pal, who has a pretty sister.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Bored out of my mind during this spectacle, I found my attention wandering to the subject of physics.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Feels uncomfortably stage-managed, and raises fundamental questions that it simply ignores.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie works so hard at juggling its cliches that it fails to generate interest in its story.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It offers certain pleasures, but suffers from an inability to structure events or know when to end a shot. And it has an ending that is simply, perhaps ridiculously, incomprehensible.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The actors cast themselves adrift on the sinking vessel of this story and go down with the ship.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    An efficient delivery system for Gotcha! Moments, of which it has about 19. Audiences who want to be Gotchaed will enjoy it.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    So anyway, what happens in Life As We Know It? You'll never guess in a million years. Never.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    You want gore, you get gore. Hatchet II plays less like a slasher movie than like the highlight reel from a slasher movie.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A closing scene, rousingly patriotic, takes place back on the football field. I think I'm beginning to understand why the Chinese were not reckoned to be a prime market for this film.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Sanctum tells the story of a terrifying adventure in an incompetent way. Some of it is exciting, the ending is involving, and all of it is a poster child for the horrors of 3-D used badly.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    What we have here is a witless attempt to merge the "Twilight" formula with the Michael Bay formula.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The standards for comic book superhero movies have been established by "Superman," "The Dark Knight," "Spider-Man 2" and "Iron Man." In that company "Thor" is pitiful. Consider even the comparable villains (Lex Luthor, the Joker, Doc Ock and Obadiah Stane). Memories of all four come instantly to mind. Will you be thinking of Loki six minutes after this movie is over?
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Take Me Home Tonight must have been made with people who had a great deal of nostalgia for the 1980s, a relatively unsung decade. More power to them. The movie unfortunately gives them no dialogue expanding them into recognizable human beings.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The movie stars Jim Carrey, who is in his pleasant mode. It would have helped if he were in his manic mode, although it's hard to get a rise out of a penguin.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    One of the dirtiest-minded mainstream releases in history. It has a low opinion of men, a lower opinion of women, and the lowest opinion of the intelligence of its audience. It is obscene, foulmouthed, scatological, creepy and perverted.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    A brutal, crude, witless high-tech CGI contrivance, in which no artificial technique has been overlooked, including 3-D.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    This new Footloose is a film without wit, humor or purpose.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The Immortals is without doubt the best-looking awful movie you will ever see.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    If there's anything I hate more than a stupid action comedy, it's an incompetent stupid action comedy. It's not so bad it's good. It's so bad it's nothing else but bad.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Joyful Noise is an ungainly assembly of parts that don't fit, and the strange thing is that it makes no particular effort to please its target audience, which would seem to be lovers of gospel choirs.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The poster art for A Thousand Words shows Eddie Murphy with duct tape over his mouth, which as a promotional idea ranks right up there with Fred Astaire in leg irons.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    It's a shaky-cam meander through an unconvincing relationship, with detours considering the process of making the film. At 91 minutes, it seems very long.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    None of the action is coherent; shots and shells are fired, people and killed or not, explosions rend the air, SUVs spin aloft (the same one more than once, I think), and there is no sense of strategy.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Ansiedad is a smart charmer, and well-played by Cierra Ramirez, she should really be above this sort of thing - above the whole movie, really.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Here is a story hammered together from discards at the Lunacy Factory. Attempting to find something to praise, I am reduced to this: Cage's performance is not boring.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    You know there's something wrong with a sex movie when the good parts are the dialogue.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    I cringed.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Prostitutes have inspired some of the most unforgettable characters in fiction. As for all of its effect on Angelina, she might as well have saved herself the wear and tear and stayed in the laundry.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    The Awakening looks great but never develops a plot with enough clarity to engage us, and the solution to the mystery is I am afraid disappointingly standard.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Ebert
    Uncle Buck attempts to tell a heart-warming story through a series of uncomfortable and unpleasant scenes; it's a tug-of-war between its ambitions and its methods.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    Stupefying dimwitted.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    An idiotic ode to macho horseshite (to employ an ancient Irish word). It is however distinguished by superb cinematography.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    The Twilight Saga: New Moon takes the tepid achievement of "Twilight" (1988), guts it, and leaves it for undead.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    A horrible experience of unbearable length, briefly punctuated by three or four amusing moments.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    The Grandma is not merely wrong for the movie, but fatal to it -- a writing and casting disaster... I've been reviewing movies for a long time, and I can't think of one that more dramatically shoots itself in the foot.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    To call A Lot like Love dead in the water is an insult to water.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    Monster-in-Law fails the Gene Siskel Test: "Is this film more interesting than a documentary of the same actors having lunch?"
    • 42 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    The philosopher Thomas Hobbes tells us life can be "poor, nasty, brutish and short." So is this movie.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    The Perfect Man crawls hand over bloody hand up the stony face of this plot, while we in the audience do not laugh because it is not nice to laugh at those less fortunate than ourselves, and the people in this movie are less fortunate than the people in just about any other movie I can think of, simply because they are in it.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    The really good superhero movies, like "Superman," "SpiderMan 2" and "Batman Begins," leave Fantastic Four so far behind that the movie should almost be ashamed to show itself in the same theaters.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    A lame-brained, outdated wheeze about a couple of good ol' boys who roar around the back roads of the South in the General Lee, their beloved 1969 Dodge Charger.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    Underclassman doesn't even try to be good. It knows that it doesn't have to be. It stars Nick Cannon, who has a popular MTV show, and it's a combo cop movie, romance, thriller and high school comedy. That makes the TV ads a slam dunk; they'll generate a Pavlovian response in viewers conditioned to react to their sales triggers (smartass young cop, basketball, sexy babes, fast cars, mockery of adults).
    • 34 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    Watching Doom is like visiting Vegas and never leaving your hotel room.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    There is not a spark of chemistry between Chris and Jamie, although the plot clearly requires them to fall in love. There is so much chemistry involved with the Anna Faris character, however, that she can set off multiple chain reactions with herself, if you see what I mean.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    Bad movie. Ugly movie.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    During the course of Failure to Launch, characters are bitten by a chipmunk, a dolphin, a lizard and a mockingbird. I am thinking my hardest why this is considered funny, and I confess defeat.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    The movie is astonishingly simple-minded, depicting characters who obediently perform their assigned roles as adulterers, cuckolds, etc.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    Here is the dirty movie of the year, slimy and scummy, and among its casualties is poor Jessica Alba, who is a cutie and shouldn't have been let out to play with these boys.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    Anything that holds our interest can be entertaining, in a way, but the movie seems to have an unwholesome determination to show us the victims being terrified and threatened. When I left the screening, I just didn't feel right.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    I recommend that Kelly keep right on cutting until he whittles it down to a ukulele pick.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    A movie about two old codgers who are nothing like people, both suffering from cancer that is nothing like cancer, and setting off on adventures that are nothing like possible.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Ebert
    Myers has made some funny movies, but this film could have been written on toilet walls by callow adolescents.