For 4,115 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 75% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 23% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 The Ghost Writer
Lowest review score: 0 Tomcats
Score distribution:
4115 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    I don't know when I've seen a thriller more frightening. I couldn't tear my eyes from the screen. Collapse is even entertaining, in a macabre sense. I think you owe it to yourself to see it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    No one is better at this kind of performance than Nicolas Cage. He's a fearless actor. He doesn't care if you think he goes over the top. If a film calls for it, he will crawl to the top hand over hand with bleeding fingernails.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A voluptuary of a film, drunk on primary colors, caressing Penelope Cruz, using the devices of a Hitchcock to distract us with surfaces while the sinister uncoils beneath. As it ravished me, I longed for a freeze frame to allow me to savor a shot.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is a thriller, not a documentary. It's my belief that the nature of the neocon evildoing has by now become pretty clear. Others will disagree. The bottom line is: This is one hell of a thriller.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The impersonation of Welles by Christian McKay in Me and Orson Welles is the centerpiece of the film, and from it, all else flows. We can almost accept that this is the Great Man.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Jeff Bridges is a virtual certainty to win his first Oscar, after four nominations.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The film is visually masterful. It's in black and white, of course.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Arnold deserves comparison with a British master director like Ken Loach.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is astonishingly original.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Red Riding Trilogy is an immersive experience like "The Best of Youth," "Brideshead Revisited" or "Nicholas Nickleby."
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This movie is the work of a man who knows how to direct a thriller. Smooth, calm, confident, it builds suspense instead of depending on shock and action.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The best performance in the film is by Arestrup as Cesar. You may remember him from Audiard's "The Beat That My Heart Skipped" (2005), where he played a seedy but confident father who psychically overshadows his son.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A compelling thriller to begin with, but it adds the rare quality of having a heroine more fascinating than the story.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Some kind of sweet, wacky masterpiece.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Juan Jose Campanella is the writer-director, and here is a man who creates a complete, engrossing, lovingly crafted film. He is filled with his stories. The Secret in Their Eyes is a rebuke to formula screenplays. We grow to know the characters, and the story pays due respect to their complexities and needs.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The movie heroes who affect me most are not extroverted. They don't strut, speechify and lead armies. They have no superpowers. They are ordinary people who are faced with a need and rise to the occasion. Ree Dolly is such a hero.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    An amazing film. It is deep, rich, human. It is not about rich and poor, but about old and new. It is about the ancient war between tradition and feeling.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The first shot tells us 45365 is the zip code of the town." In this achingly beautiful film, that zip code belongs to Sidney, Ohio, a handsome town of about 20,000 residents.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    We laugh, that we may not cry. But none of this philosophy comes close to the insane logic of "M*A*S*H," which is achieved through a peculiar marriage of cinematography, acting, directing, and writing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It's gloriously absurd. This movie has holes in it big enough to drive the whole movie through. The laws of physics seem to be suspended here the same way as in a Road Runner cartoon.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Inception does a difficult thing. It is wholly original, cut from new cloth, and yet structured with action movie basics so it feels like it makes more sense than (quite possibly) it does.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    There is the sense they're fighting for each other more than for ideology.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Here is a gripping film with the focus of a Japanese drama, an impenetrable character to equal Alain Delon's in "Le Samourai," by Jean-Pierre Melville.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is a good movie, from a masterful novel.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    David Fincher's film has the rare quality of being not only as smart as its brilliant hero, but in the same way. It is cocksure, impatient, cold, exciting and instinctively perceptive.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is a great film about greatness, the story of the horse and the no less brave woman who had faith in him.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It's one of those extraordinary films, like "Hoop Dreams," that tells a story the makers could not possibly have anticipated in advance. It works like stunning, grieving fiction.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    One of the most fascinating aspects of Inside Job involves the chatty on-camera insights of Kristin Davis, a Wall Street madam, who says the Street operated in a climate of abundant sex and cocaine for valued clients and the traders themselves.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is a film for intelligent people who are naturally curious about what happens when the shutters close.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Is the film watchable? Yes, compulsively.

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