For 4,340 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 74% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 24% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Howards End
Lowest review score: 0 Tomcats
Score distribution:
4340 movie reviews
    • 49 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The suspense screws up tighter than a drum-head. The characters remain believable; we have a conflict of personalities, not stereotypes. The action coexists seamlessly with the message.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A fresh, quirky, unusually intelligent comedy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It simply looks at the day as it unfolds, and that is a brave and radical act; it refuses to supply reasons and assign cures, so that we can close the case and move on.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The movie is uncommonly absorbing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The very best thing about the movie is its dialogue. Paul Brickman, who wrote and directed, has an ear so good that he knows what to leave out.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It's one of those extraordinary films, like "Hoop Dreams," that tells a story the makers could not possibly have anticipated in advance. It works like stunning, grieving fiction.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Has no ragged edges or bothersome detours, and flows from surprise to delight. At the end, when just desserts are handed out, it arrives at a kind of perfection.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This film is delightful in the way it finds its own way to tell its own story. There was no model to draw on, but Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini, who wrote and directed it, have made a great film by trusting to Pekar's artistic credo.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A documentary with no pretense of objectivity. Here is Mike Tyson's story in his own words, and it is surprisingly persuasive.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Lost in America is being called a yuppie comedy, but it's really about the much more universal subjects of greed, hedonism and panic. What makes it so funny is how much we can identify with it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    We laugh, that we may not cry. But none of this philosophy comes close to the insane logic of "M*A*S*H," which is achieved through a peculiar marriage of cinematography, acting, directing, and writing.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    I wanted to hug this movie. It takes such a risky journey and never steps wrong. It creates specific, original, believable, lovable characters, and meanders with them through their inconsolable days, never losing its sense of humor.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Here is a film where God does not intervene and the directors do not mistake themselves for God. It makes the solutions at the ends of other pictures seem like child's play.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Red Riding Trilogy is an immersive experience like "The Best of Youth," "Brideshead Revisited" or "Nicholas Nickleby."
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This isn't an adaptation of a comic book, it's like a comic book brought to life and pumped with steroids.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Not many movies like this get made, because not many filmmakers are so bold, angry and defiant.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Like all good satirists, he knows that too much realism will weaken his effect. He lets you know he's making a comedy. There's an over-the-top exuberance to the intricate crosscut editing and to the hyperactive camera.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    One of the most fascinating aspects of Inside Job involves the chatty on-camera insights of Kristin Davis, a Wall Street madam, who says the Street operated in a climate of abundant sex and cocaine for valued clients and the traders themselves.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is such a rare movie. Its characters are uncompromisingly themselves, flawed, stubborn, vulnerable.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The film concludes not with a "surprise ending" but with a series of shots that brilliantly summarize all that has gone before. This is masterful filmmaking.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This movie gets you coming and going.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Causes us to leave the theater quite unreasonably happy.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    That such intelligence could be contained in a movie that is simultaneously so funny and so entertaining is some kind of a miracle.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Oh, what a lovely film. I was almost hugging myself while I watched it.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Rotates its story through satire, comedy, suspense and violence, until it emerges as one of the best films I've ever seen.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Spellbinding.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Leigh's Another Year is like a long, purifying soak in empathy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Bahrani, as director, not only stays out of the way of the simplicity of his story, but relies on it; less is more, and with restraint he finds a grimy eloquence.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    No actor is better than Bill Murray at doing nothing at all, and being fascinating while not doing it. Buster Keaton had the same gift for contemplating astonishing developments with absolute calm. Buster surrounded himself with slapstick, and in Broken Flowers Jim Jarmusch surrounds Murray with a parade of formidable women.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    One of the year's best films for a lot of reasons, including its ability to involve the audience almost breathlessly in a story of mounting tragedy.

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