For 454 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1 point higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Moore's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Dallas Buyers Club
Lowest review score: 25 Scary Movie 5
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 72 out of 454
454 movie reviews
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Watts masters Diana’s look — the way she carried her head and used those wide, coyly expressive eyes — but is only passable at impersonating the voice.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Hemingway wins us over and, in the end, comes off as earnest in her desire to use her celebrity to help shine a light on the maladies that have shattered her family, time and again.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Last Vegas isn’t “out there” in a “Hangover” sense. It’s comical comfort food, with actors doing the sorts of things they’ve done for decades. But even if this is the safest Vegas romp of them all, this cast never lets us forget that we’re in very good hands.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Writer-director Ted Koland can be a little obvious. It’s not a deep movie. But everybody, especially Ramsey, is dealing with something. And Timlin (TV’s “Zero Hour”) gives heart to this wonderful, nuanced character.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    The design is brighter and sharper, the jokes are broader and the villainy utterly generic in this by-the-(comic)-book adaptation.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    The film stumbles into a cross-country odyssey that dominates its last third. That is fascinating, but not properly set up, much like the film itself. How I Live Now skips over the “How,” loses itself in the “I” and never lets the pathos of “Live Now” pay off.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    The bad guys really stand out, with Mikkelsen pulling off something he never managed as a Bond villain. He’s genuinely frightening.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Try as she might, Collyer cannot help but judge these people, a not-quite-fatal flaw in a movie about the down and out.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    For all its sure-handed sense of place, its occasional grace notes of loss, grief and misery, This is Where We Live fails to seize and break our hearts, keeping its glum characters at arm’s length and doling out “hope” in tiny, cloying teaspoon-size servings.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    An amusing, well-acted and sharply-timed holiday comedy, old friends getting together to prove that careers, families and kids aside, they’ve still got their R-rated edge, just as they did in college.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    So it’s no “Starbuck,” which most people won’t mind because Americans don’t read subtitles. But even in this form, Delivery Man and the guy who plays him still deliver where it counts.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Modestly entertaining and uplifting version of a “greatest story” that has proven as malleable as it is timeless.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    The movie is so “interior,” it so zeroes in on Isaac and his baleful stare, that we’re relieved any time something overtly funny happens.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    There’s wit and whimsy in this 53rd Disney cartoon, a distant cousin of Hans Christian Andersen’s classic fairytale, “The Snow Queen.”
    • 30 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    An old fashioned romantic mystery that benefits from a wizened, much-honored cast and a still-exotic setting.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Twice Born fails to tug at the heartstrings or wring tears from us. Hirsch plays exuberant and callow well, Cruz is tragic and earthy as ever. But the two of them never really click — sex scenes included.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    The buffoonery goes epic in this sillier than silly sequel, a broad, down and dirty comedy overfilled with funny people trying to one-up one another on the set in the classic “best line wins” school of comic improvisation.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    “Walking” takes care to ID each new dinosaur species introduced, including factoids about what they ate and any special skills they might have had. It’s downright educational. Just don’t tell your kids that.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    The characters are only superficially sketched in, but we still fear for them, understand their code and above all else, appreciate the dirty, bloody, high-risk work these professionals do. That they go through all this and risk everything, by choice, is something Berg, to his credit, never lets us forget.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Osage County does offer up one almost-heartbreaking moment. But it’s so icky that, like the rest of the film, you kind of want to wash it out of your mouth — with supermarket Merlot — rather than savor it.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Beyond Outrage reaches above and beyond most Hollywood underworld movies to deliver a tale of righteous revenge doled out only after showing us how much it is deserved.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Cranston takes small bites of this Beef Jerky Tartar script and chews, chews chews — savoring every corny fake-Russian line like the voice actor he was before “Breaking Bad” made him a star.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Divorce Corp is a lot pointed outrage that damning as its seems, feels suspect.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Gooding brings just enough streetwise credibility to make Brown work.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Better than any animated film released in the doldrums of January has a right to be.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Branagh & Co. keep up appearances with a thriller that works mainly because all of its parts — locations, fights and plot twists — are well worn from all the thrillers they’ve been in before.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    A fascinating documentary experiment in fathoming the heretofor “unfathomable” genius of Johannes Vermeer.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Clooney, for the first time in his directing career (“Good Night, and Good Luck,” “The Ides of March”) never finds the sweet spot, and never quite wrestled the script into a shape entertaining enough to make the liberties he and Heslov took with the facts worth it.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    There’s nothing deep in this script, and the delayed romance, between real-life lovers Roberts and Evan Peters (of “American Horror Story”) sets off no sparks. The characters are sort of a grab bag of “types.”
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    What keeps us around until the closing credits, where Hart and Hall bust each other up, is the electrical charge between those two. They’re the Wimbledon Finals of sexy, sassy, drunken comic banter — two pros, evenly matched enough to put on a great show, even if they make us forget about the rest of the movie around them as they do.