For 1,087 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Moore's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Magician: The Astonishing Life and Work of Orson Welles
Lowest review score: 12 Creature
Score distribution:
1,087 movie reviews
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Renner’s performance — beginning with bluster and descending into twitchy paranoia — sells it and makes us fret for every “messenger” suddenly the target of the spotlight himself.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Murray and writer-director Theodore Melfi play us like a music box, manipulating and charming our socks off even as the Vincent for whom the film is named curses, gambles, drinks and cheats — all in front of an impressionable 10-year old.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Simien focuses too much on the character played by his star, Williams, which seems a mistake. Scenes are underscored with classical music chestnuts, a trite way of suggesting “academia.” And the ending is an eye-roller.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    It’s good, not great, and it’s not Ayer’s fault that the rarer these B-movies become, the more we expect from them.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Chilling, cruel and funny — in an icy, Swedish way.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    “Cheerful” and “triumphant” aren’t words that come to mind when you think of Alzheimer’s, the debilitating illness that destroys memory, mind and body. But darned if country star Glen Campbell doesn’t manage that in Glen Campbell: I’ll Be Me.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Rene Russo is spot-on as Nina, an aging TV news director who is the only person Bloom will sell his footage to.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Whatever twists this puzzle tosses at us, the film reminds us that a great actor, in close-up, telling a story with just her or his eyes, is still the greatest special effect the movies have to offer. This cast telling this story ensures us that nobody will be dozing off Before I Go to Sleep.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    An old fashioned Japanese folk tale beautifully rendered in old-fashioned hand-drawn animation.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    It’s manipulative and overlong, too loud and “Incredibles” action-packed for the very young. But the manipulation errs on the side of mercy, compassion, sacrifice and humanity.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Rosewater was the name Bahari gave his persecutor (Kim Bodnia), a cunning, perfumed older man charged with getting a confession from this Westernized Iranian, a confession that discredits his reporting and the bad light Iran is in since the election, with its ensuing violent government crackdown on protesters.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    As “cute and cuddly” as ever, and often downright hilarious.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness is a great name for a documentary about Hayao Miyazaki and his animation house, Japan’s Studio Ghibli.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    And as long as it is, it would be a pity to cut one moment of Spall’s immersive, utterly convincing portrait of this common man with an uncommon gift.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Moore makes us root for Alice, not for a cure, which still seems a reach, but for a completion of her life’s goals, a chance to control her fate as long as she has the wherewithal to do it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    For all its stunning and stark wilderness settings (Spain and the Canary Islands), its stunning effects, technical proficiency and scriptural cleverness, Exodus is a chilly affair... It’s still an exciting, entertaining epic.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    It’s the directing debut of Angus MacLachlan, who wrote “Junebug” and thus gave Amy Adams the perfect introduction to the world. “Goodbye” displays the same canny ear for human interactions, both comical and confessional.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Cooper, to his credit, rarely flinches, never chest-thumps and never loses his cool, even when Kyle is starting to lose his. It’s a masterful interpretation of a man with a lot more on his mind and blood on his hands than he was ever inclined to let on. And it’s a performance worthy of Eastwood himself — 50 years ago.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    In a film with righteous outrage yet limited violent action, it takes a great performance to make us root against meeting violence with violence. Isaac and Chandor make that come off.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Anyone who has heard tapes of the real King confronting LBJ will realize that the power dynamic depicted here just doesn’t ring true. King’s moral authority asserted itself, but nobody stood up to Johnson to his face. Nobody.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    It’s a bit too spare and Malik-like for its own good. But the incessant voice-over, another Malick trademark, here makes the whole enterprise feel overheard, a story constructed from memory where the words are just ways of underlining what we would come to know about Lincoln the man based on Lincoln the boy.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    The politics are rarely overt. “Pussy Riot” stories pop up on TV, and the Orthodox Church’s role in the hierarchy (cozying up to power, serving as a calming “opiate” to the masses) is mocked. Zvyagintsev is a bit too willing, in this overlong film, to let the landscape, the remote setting and the insular world of crumbling apartment blocks, sagging houses, collapsing churches grey skies shape the film’s message.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Bonneville, who did mostly comedy, pre-“Downton,” rediscovers his funny bone.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    When it’s over, there’s nothing more to take from the film than the uneasy feeling that what we’ve seen is either intolerant and biased, or a warning. It’s not Islamophobic to fear the spread of this primitive oppression, be it in Syria or Nigeria.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    In French with English subtitles, is a showcase for Anne Dorval in the title role. Over the course of this overlong melodrama she wins our understanding and occasionally our sympathy as she struggles to get and keep a job, find a man and keep her maddening, monster of a son (Antoine-Olivier Pilon) under control.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    “Selma” wasn’t the only film about race to get short shrift from Oscar voters this past year. Black or White is a frank, touching and very well-acted melodrama about child custody and cultural perceptions of “blackness” and “the race card,” and could have earned Octavia Spencer and Kevin Costner fresh Oscar nominations.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    A moving and entertaining documentary about the young international volunteers who dashed to Israel in 1948 to create an Israeli Air Force.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    It’s a playful and tasty crash course in deli history, deli dining and deli language, a world of smoked meats, cured meats and fresh fish. Vegetarians are excused.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Forbes makes this story compelling, moving and provocative enough to prompt outrage.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    '71
    It’s an intricate, intimate thriller about a single soldier’s nightmare day and night on the front lines.

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