For 2,079 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Moore's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 The Florida Project
Lowest review score: 0 The Room
Score distribution:
2079 movie reviews
    • 59 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    Buy the kids the soundtrack, skip the movie.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    It’s bracing and inspiring, what filmmakers Keith Fulton and Leo Pepe show us in that first hour.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Moore
    A Great American Play becomes a Great American Film with Fences, Denzel Washington’s letter-faithful adaptation of August Wilson’s Pulitzer Prize winning masterpiece.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    Quest or no quest, cool locations or green screen soundstages, shirtless Fassbender or Fassbender in an assassin’s hoodie, “Assassin’s” never breaks the creed of Hollywood filmed video games — “Action packed, but dull.”
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    McDonagh’s script is so ad hoc, so clumsily random, that nothing adds up to anything.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Moore
    The film has lots of promising problems for us to dive into with our heroes, mechanical and philosophical puzzles to sort out. But from the opening moments, Jon Spaihts’ screenplay drifts off course, choosing to explain things that would be more dramatic as mysteries and secrets.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Miss Sloane is a Capital Hill tale in the “State of Play/House of Cards” mold, a melodramatic thriller more realistic than “Scandal,” slightly less riveting than “Scandal.”
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    A Monster Calls makes a case for remembering that fairytales can terrify as they teach and test us.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    It’s almost wholly satisfying — witty, warm and entertaining — a film in which fatalism isn’t a joke, where pitiless death is doled out by Empire and Rebellion, where those deaths have weight and meaning, where suspense is genuine.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Moore
    If “Collateral” fails to move you — and it might, because I was untouched — it may have to do with the clumsy clockwork machinations of a script that has to make its entire unholy and unethical premise seem “logical” and understandable.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    It’s fair if not entirely accurate to say everything funny it you can see in the trailers and TV ads for Why Him? Because those samples aren’t the least big amusing, and there is a random laugh or three in this holiday comedy to put the “R” back in Christmas.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Warm and witty performances by Spencer, Hensen and Monae, the stoic moral stature Costner plays and unlikable-until-they’re-reasonable turns by Dunst and Parsons make Hidden Figures a winner, a piece of unknown history rendered flesh and blood funny, uplifting and never less than entertaining.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Moore
    Portman lets us feel the way her loss utterly empties life of meaning and purpose. But Chilean director Pablo Larrain (“The Club”) lets little John Jr. (Aiden and Brody Weinberg) provide the heart-wrenching release, just as he did back at that state funeral in 1963.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Moore
    Big moments drown in a soundmix of sappy muzak. Good actors are wasted, left and right. Classic Montiel.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    A cluttered, ham-fisted farce that pulls its punches so often that it never pops, a meandering mess that never gets up to the speed one needs to achieve “romp.”
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    The germ of an interesting idea was here, and the collection of murder rooms makes for a dazzling third act setting. But the movie flatlines every time a chewy supporting player (Michael Pare is another) isn’t on the screen.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 25 Roger Moore
    Dullness “Incarnate,” in other words.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Moore
    As its quickly stumbles through its crimes and clues, A Kind of Murder leaves you with the uneasy feeling that a promising mystery has simply been designed to death.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Moore
    Lion is moving and inspiring.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Nicolas Pecse’s debut feature as writer-director is a patient, pitiless thriller, a macabre tale set in the rural South where random violence is the stuff of folk legend, and morbid bluegrass ballads.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Benson, who turns 87 on Dec. 2, comes off as an adorable Scots curmudgeon in Justin Bare and Matthew Miele’s film.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Moore
    What Lonergan has created here is one of the cinema’s defining statements on the kind of grief that leaves you gutted, of wounds that will never heal. He’s got the guts to make us uncomfortable in scene after scene, and the courage to deny us “The Hollywood Ending.”
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Moore
    It’s rarely scary. But the effects suggest a bigger budget than “SiRENS” might have warranted. And a couple of those are downright impressive and add to the feeling that this indie Satanic slasher pic is punching above its weight class.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Moore
    The movie unravels as its surprises become melodramatic flourishes, undercutting its tension with coincidences, lapses in motivation and head-scratching responses to situations that are pretty conventional — cut and dried — despite the lurid, Vegas/Ellis undertones.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    A striking if predictable and plainly-staged docudrama set in one of the world’s most forbidding landscapes.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Writer-director Damien Chazelle (“Whiplash”) reaches for the stars, and cast the picture beautifully. But this throwback musical (songs by Justin Hurwitz) lurches along on show business cliches in between dreamy flights of fancy.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Even if it is too brief and leaves too much out to be “definitive,” it serves up heaping helpings of Mifune’s film work and bits of home movies and the like to create a fascinating man-behind the stoic face/samurai icon below-the-topknot portrait of Mifune.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    The settings are pristine, and feel about as real and lived in as “The Polar Express.” The performances have a stiffness that borders on motion-capture animation. Director Robert Zemeckis brings us a “Casablanca” without a scrap of heart, an “English Patient” with all of the splendor, and none of the heat.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    It’s more scenic than dramatic. Sadly, the same could be said about Lautner, who never seems to deliver even as his window for “stardom” closes.

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