For 130 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Sam Adams' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Lowest review score: 10 The Mummy
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 69 out of 130
  2. Negative: 8 out of 130
130 movie reviews
    • 37 Metascore
    • 67 Sam Adams
    It’s a deeply confused movie, sometimes productively so.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Sam Adams
    This might be the best week for The Reluctant Fundamentalist to open or the worst, but the timing doesn’t matter when the powder is damp.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Sam Adams
    Many of Herzog’s recent documentaries have been produced under the aegis of TV channels, and “Lo and Behold” often feels like a miniseries compressed into feature form. Its segments broaden an understanding of the internet’s impact, but they don’t meaningfully interact with each other.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Sam Adams
    The movie's exterior is solid, but it's hollow inside, like a safe filled with air.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 67 Sam Adams
    Levinson stuffs the movie with so many emotional cross-currents and minor revelations that it's hard to keep them all straight, but the movie works the audience's nerves with enough determination to get under the skin and stay there, a sensation that comes awfully close to an earned emotional response.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Sam Adams
    Like its characters, who can't believe their stable nation could be threatened by ethnic unrest, Cirkus Columbia looks to the past, evoking the kind of unreal, vaguely politicized tales that were once the lifeblood of arthouse cinema.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Sam Adams
    If the idea is for the audience to feel similarly yanked around, then What Maisie Knew succeeds wildly, but it fails to bring much insight to what essentially amounts to a massive parental guilt trip.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Sam Adams
    Once the battle is joined in earnest, what began as sharp-edged parody starts to feel more like a cheap imitation, even if it’s still shot through with a few priceless zingers. The tough thing about genre hybrids is that they have to fulfill both genres, and Grabbers only nails one of them.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Sam Adams
    Like a well-crafted garment, it's seamless. There's plenty of amour, but not enough fou.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Sam Adams
    The Cold Lands goes flat in this middle section. Gilroy’s visual style is strong, but he doesn’t frame the images to chart Atticus’ development, and Yelich, whose only previous screen experience is starring in the video Gilroy directed for R.E.M.’s “It Happened Today,” doesn’t suggest what’s going on beneath the layers of trauma and withdrawal.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Sam Adams
    Unfortunately, Kill Your Darlings doesn’t know what to do with Radcliffe and DeHaan, good as they are; there’s little sense of how they fit into a larger framework, or what bearing, if any, it might have on its more famous subjects’ later output.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Sam Adams
    The visual scheme of Leone’s movie leaves no doubt as to his familiarity with Kurosawa’s movie. Plopping Eastwood’s roving gunman down in the middle of a dusty street with opposing gangs lodged at either end, Fistful replicates Yojimbo’s visual plan to an almost distracting extent. The bigger problem with Fistful is that Leone is still attempting to work with a conventional plot, which never plays to his strengths.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Sam Adams
    t’s hardly a masterpiece, but then, it shows no signs it ever wanted to be, and sometimes that’s a relief.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Sam Adams
    Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets is a luxurious, appealingly daffy spectacle, a true vision unchecked by the standards of good taste, and that in and of itself is a quality worth savoring. But its design is pixel-deep, without the underlying thought that makes great science fiction worth revisiting.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Sam Adams
    The whole movie starts to feel like a dare or elaborate game, the characters shuffling obediently about the board with no rules to guide them. Myths grow out of a need to understand the world, and to pass on an understanding of how to make our way through it, but Lanthimos just teaches you to be more cautious about his next film.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 58 Sam Adams
    For the most part, Neshoba is content to treat progress as a matter of reconciling with the past rather than dealing with the present.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 58 Sam Adams
    Black seems to be aiming for some sort of loopy fantasia, a tragic fable about struggling with difference in the small-town South, but he's got more half-finished ideas than he can handle.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 58 Sam Adams
    During a dinner with Stephanie's colorfully ethnic family, including a squandered Debbie Reynolds, the reaction shots arrive with bludgeoning regularity, and the soundtrack's burbling organ serves as an incessant reminder not to take anything seriously. Fortunately, there's no danger of that.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Sam Adams
    The credibility Bowen and Amy Seimetz, as his fearful ex-girlfriend, bring to their roles nearly legitimizes the movie's underlying silliness.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Sam Adams
    White Girl wants credit for its provocations, but it’s not provoking us towards any particularly insights, just pointing out that white privilege exists and then calling it a day. It’s “Woke af: The Movie.”
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Sam Adams
    Central Intelligence doesn’t feel like the birth of a great comic duo — more like a blind date that goes a little better than expected. The chemistry’s not there yet, but let’s give it another shot.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 58 Sam Adams
    Continental Drift feels less like an extension of a theatrical franchise than an episode of a middling TV cartoon, lolling around on territory that's already been settled. Jokes are recycled so frequently, it's as if comedy writing was eating a hole in the ozone layer.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 Sam Adams
    It's true that Americans contribute disproportionately to the problem, but catering to the idea that we're separate from the rest of the world isn't part of the solution.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 58 Sam Adams
    No matter where Ferguson goes, he finds a way to sit someone in a chair and point a camera at them, resulting in a movie whose stultifying dullness works against the urgency of its message.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 58 Sam Adams
    The character-building is proffered in bad faith, like every scene in Safe that doesn't involve bloodshed. Statham can sell a punch, but not his own vulnerability.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 58 Sam Adams
    Good For Nothing is billed as the first Western shot in New Zealand, but that tourist-brochure distinction pales besides its more pungent claim to fame as the first Western whose hero spends the entire film attempting to overcome a bout of erectile dysfunction.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 58 Sam Adams
    The movie's gathering of third-rank action heroes provides sufficient brawn but precious little onscreen charisma, although Brian Cox's reliable bluster lights up his handful of scenes as a bellicose baron.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 58 Sam Adams
    Sy and Cluzet give their parts more conviction than they deserve, even when the former is forced to re-enact the falsetto-singing-in-the-bubblebath bit from Pretty Woman. But even their energy can't revive a corpse this dead.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Sam Adams
    At least Black Butterflies gets the tortured-soul part right.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 58 Sam Adams
    Not withstanding rich performances from Wilson and Lonsdale, the film never comes close to embodying that level of complexity.

Top Trailers