For 152 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Sam Adams' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Barbara
Lowest review score: 10 The Mummy
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 79 out of 152
  2. Negative: 9 out of 152
152 movie reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Sam Adams
    Not too far beneath the movie’s superficial abrasiveness is a desperate desire to be loved, a puppyish determination that is both hard to resist and, eventually, difficult to endure.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Sam Adams
    It’s galling for a movie that costs so much and takes up so much cultural space to try to do so little, but it’s a familiar disappointment, like the dull ache of a tooth that only bothers you when you bite down on it wrong.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Sam Adams
    Sitting through its 2 hours and 30 minutes is like gorging on tapas: You wind up both overstuffed and unsatisfied.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Sam Adams
    There are moments when the movie takes us firmly by the hand and escorts us down a darkened path, and they lead to one of the most profound of communal pleasures: the sound of a movie audience screaming as one.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Sam Adams
    In a film of more prepossessing style, the glaring leaps of logic might be easier to overlook, or at least there’d be more incentive to do so, but the cellphone is Soderbergh’s enemy as well.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Sam Adams
    The best thing you can say about The Strangers: Prey at Night, the sequel to writer-director Bryan Bertino’s 2008 home-invasion creeper, is that it reminds you the original exists.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Sam Adams
    The back and forth between McAdams and Bateman is what makes Game Night sing.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Sam Adams
    Duncan Jones must have believed there was an incredible movie in his head. If there was, it’s still in there.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Sam Adams
    While the film is deliberately crude in some respects — Park once described his aesthetic as making sure that, no matter how carefully sculpted his clay figures were, he always left the thumbprints showing — it’s fastidiously detailed in others, dancing between broad humor and subtle, almost subliminal gags as it plays out the conflict between Neanderthals and their evolutionary successors.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Sam Adams
    Eastwood and Blyskal can’t seem to decide whether they want Stone et al. to be ordinary people thrust into an extraordinary situation or whether they were destined for greatness, so they waffle between foreshadowing and simply biding their time.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Sam Adams
    Great(ish) ideas and terrible ones sit cheek by jowl, original notions and blatant thievery corralled together with no discernible logic. It’s a horror movie one moment, a comedy the next, as if Netflix were streaming several different titles at once.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Sam Adams
    Focusing the camera on Vega, an openly trans actress (apparently Chile’s first), allows A Fantastic Woman to tell a different, richer kind of story and allows us to process the subtleties of her performance without always having to evaluate the success of the underlying transformation.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Sam Adams
    The world is not so full of beauty that one can wave away Mary’s visual majesty, especially now that its hand-drawn style is nearly a thing of the past. But the flaws in its writing are harder to overlook.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Sam Adams
    The Commuter has nothing so heady as the plight of the forgotten man on its mind. The movie, whose screenplay is credited to Byron Willinger, Philip de Blasi, and Ryan Engle, is flagrantly, even willfully silly, juiced with such corny audacity it frequently made me laugh out loud.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Sam Adams
    Like Barnum himself, it’s an elegant fraud, nice enough to look at as long as you don’t look too close.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Sam Adams
    Like many before it, The Last Jedi has already been hailed as the best Star Wars movie since The Empire Strikes Back, and while that’s true, it’s too faint a compliment. It’s a film of genuine beauty, one where you come away as eager to talk about the set design and the choreography as you do the fate of the galaxy or what might happen next.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Sam Adams
    The tone is tongue-in-cheek, with teeth gritted so hard you can taste just a hint of blood.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Sam Adams
    An engaging but safe journey towards a predetermined destination that engages the mind but not the heart. The movie doesn’t quite extract blood, sweat, or tears, even if it does toil.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Sam Adams
    The movie slips into a familiar rut and the scenery fades into the background.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Sam Adams
    Branagh is more preoccupied with the challenges of keeping a movie set in a series of steel tubes visually interesting than he is in engaging its story.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Sam Adams
    The whole movie starts to feel like a dare or elaborate game, the characters shuffling obediently about the board with no rules to guide them. Myths grow out of a need to understand the world, and to pass on an understanding of how to make our way through it, but Lanthimos just teaches you to be more cautious about his next film.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Sam Adams
    It’s easy to make The Meyerowitz Stories sound tortured, and less so to convey the immense but not blinding affection with which Baumbach treats his characters.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Sam Adams
    Barry is the closest thing Tom Cruise has played to a regular Joe in more than a decade, and the part isn’t a snug fit.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Sam Adams
    Vaughn hasn’t only run out of things to say but people to hate, and without that underlying aggression, the movie feels like it’s just going through the motions. Better luck next time, bruv.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Sam Adams
    Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets is a luxurious, appealingly daffy spectacle, a true vision unchecked by the standards of good taste, and that in and of itself is a quality worth savoring. But its design is pixel-deep, without the underlying thought that makes great science fiction worth revisiting.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Sam Adams
    At its headiest, it’s like Singin’ in the Rain with a souped-up engine, but even if Baby is the Gene Kelly of the getaway car, watching Baby Driver always feels like watching someone else do the driving rather than being behind the wheel yourself.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Sam Adams
    Cars 3 is still lower-tier Pixar.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 10 Sam Adams
    Cruise seems weariest of all, flogging outdated merchandise he can’t even pretend to believe in. It’s not Cruise that feels ancient; it’s The Mummy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Sam Adams
    This is a film of highs and lows; there is no middle ground, no moment of silence, reflection or introspection. “Joshua” stays frustratingly on message.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Sam Adams
    The relationship between these two Fassbenders is at the heart of Alien: Covenant, and it’s one of the few things that really entertain on a level beyond the technical.

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