For 397 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Sara Stewart's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 20th Century Women
Lowest review score: 0 Would You Rather
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 83 out of 397
397 movie reviews
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    It’s basically a narrative spin on Alex Gibney’s 2013 documentary “The Armstrong Lie,” only with less cycling footage. This is a plus for those of us easily bored by such things (so many interchangeable mountain passes and neon jerseys!), but there isn’t a ton of new material here.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    The facts (including Protess’ eventual resignation) still make this a worthwhile examination of a narrative that actually may have been too good to be true.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    The best thing about the film – which is true of most of his roles – is Rockwell.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    The dark side of pregnancy and motherhood has long been fertile filmmaking terrain; this queasy, quiet horror film tips its hat, inevitably, to the genre’s standard-bearer, “Rosemary’s Baby,” but comes up a bit short.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Chastain and Wasikowska take center stage while Hiddleston flutters around like one of Allerdale’s huge black moths. Watching the women square off within del Toro’s eye-popping, painterly palette is a feast for the eyes, if not particularly substantial fare for the mind.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Ultimately, I found the story surrounding Equity — that it is a movie about women on Wall Street, financed largely by actual women on Wall Street — more interesting than the movie itself, but it does contain its share of memorable moments.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Farrell feels like a weak link here, never quite as masterfully manipulative or brutish as the role calls for.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    As About Alex moves toward its conclusion, it devolves into some plot resolutions that were a lot less predictable back in the ’80s.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    A trove of home videos, vintage commercial and propaganda footage and black-and-white animation dress up this energetic if somewhat unfocused look at the birth of skateboarding in the German Democratic Republic.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Finally, someone took the source material at its terribly written word and stopped treating the whole affair so seriously.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    The journey to this foregone conclusion features several dance-offs mashing up contemporary and classical styles, which director Michael Damian (“Love By Design”) shoots with gusto. Sure, this is all a familiar tune — but it’s still catchy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Still, the proceedings move so quietly and thoughtfully as to be occasionally somnolent, though they’re punctuated with spasms of the violence that marked the Troubles.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    “It’s a little self-congratulatory and light on story,” says one student of another’s film project in Dear White People, which feels like director Justin Simien getting out ahead of inevitable (and accurate) criticism.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Seth Rogen’s raunchy Sausage Party contains occasional flashes of satirical brilliance. But in true stoner form, it also thinks a lot of stuff is funnier than it actually is.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Scored by Bruce Hornsby, Lee’s film veers all over the place tonally, juxtaposing scenes of spurting gore with soothing jazz. Hess’ WASP-y mansion, with its huge photo portraits of African warriors, is an interesting study in mashing up race and class stereotypes, though the film’s rambling plot may leave your brain feeling a little mashed, too.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Unfortunately, you could probably improve Split by editing out everything around McAvoy and making it an experimental one-man show.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    There are a lot of parallels with “Breaking Bad” here: the Southwestern setting, the dorky husband turned criminal, the blond wife and the scene in the carwash. But if you can avoid dwelling on its derivative qualities, After the Fall has its own case to make about how far the middle class has fallen — and continues to slide.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Personal Shopper doesn’t have much of a plot, but if you can tune into its languid frequency, it will get under your skin.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    For a bad movie, this one is an awful lot of fun.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    The mellow Laue... makes a likable enough subject, if sometimes low-key to the point of dull. Watching other people watch him play, though, is definitely not.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Sometimes, it’s enough to walk out of a film with your heart warmed — even if your brain’s still craving a little something more.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Overall, Gibney does a fine job documenting the timeless nature of Armstrong’s fall from grace. It’s undeniably satisfying to see the man himself lay it out: “It’s very hard to control the truth forever,” he says, awkwardly. “This has been my downfall.”
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Director Daniel Algrant chose well with Badgley, who transcends the rather made-for-TV vibe with a decent rendition of Buckley’s haunting falsetto.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    If you can handle the glacial pacing and lack of dialogue, there is a certain squirmy satisfaction to watching this well-worn story of love, cruelty and madness play out minus the long-winded speeches and romantic catharsis.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Director Ben Wheatley (“Kill List”) is masterful with arresting imagery set in a dystopian spin on the ’70s; less so with a compelling narrative.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Wilson doesn’t have the emotional heft, or the narrative arc, of Johnson’s last film, but it does remind you how much fun it is to watch Harrelson. In real life, Wilson would just be a straight-up a - - hole.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    In a movie season - and a month - filled with so much gunfire, bloodshed and human despair, it's refreshing to sit back and bask in the sheer joy with which these brightly costumed, stunningly agile performers navigate fire, water and air.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Jane's friendship with Sadie is the one thing that cuts through the numbness - though the film's so low-key, even emotional revelations feel pretty muted.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    The element that really makes it work — when it does, which is not always — is Edward James Olmos, playing to perfection a weary retired police detective.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    It may fall into some conventional paces as a triumph-over-adversity story, but Desert Dancer does manage to movingly convey the chilling, ultimately triumphant experience of Ghaffarian’s struggle for creative expression under a regime that tried to crush it.

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