For 154 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Sara Stewart's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 The Broken Circle Breakdown
Lowest review score: 0 10 Rules for Sleeping Around
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 56 out of 154
  2. Negative: 42 out of 154
154 movie reviews
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    For a movie called Sparkle, the absolutely least interesting or central thing about it is Sparkle (and Sparks), although the "Idol" singer does bust out one impressive performance.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    This is hardly reinventing the wheel, but it is serviceable, if you're looking for a few shivery communal scares.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Here's the thing: Found footage is scary when - because - it leaves you to fill in a lot of the blanks yourself. But actually watching whole families have terrible things done to them - well, hard-core horror fans may dig it, I guess. I'd call it forced voyeurism of the worst sort.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Tonally, the film swings between whispery romance and ominous horror as it explores the dark side of love and lust, including an amusingly gory meditation on the notion that the person you think is your beloved might just rip your heart out.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    At the risk of sounding 100, I think it’s regrettable this film had to be shot in digital 3-D. Both those formats actually do a frustrating disservice to the depiction of the action, making them look choppier, more flickery and occasionally blurrier than they would otherwise.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    An inoffensive but bland ode to the talky high school movies of John Hughes and Cameron Crowe.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Director Ben Hickernell soft-pedals the material into a blandly feel-good dramedy. As Abigail's spirited young trainees, Alexandra Metz and Meredith Apfelbaum give Backwards their all, but can't row their way clear of its clichés.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Watching this yoga documentary mirrored how I feel about taking weekly classes: The ancient Eastern tradition is demonstrably beneficial for both mind and body, but its execution can be so boring and its teachers so painfully earnest.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Too much of the film is taken up by creaky plot devices and one sibling vowing to track down and talk to another one to resolve a problem.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    There's also a refreshing lack of wrapping everything up in a neat, happy bow at the end.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    While Caplan works well in theory as an antiromantic-comedy heroine, director and co-screenwriter Michael Mohan just doesn't give her enough to do.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Temple and Angarano, entertaining enough, never quite sell the idea that this goodhearted couple would be so easily transformed by greed.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Alas, the film’s relevance — and ultimately sane upshot — is buried beneath a meandering and oftimplausible plot.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Director Christian Charles gets some comic mileage from the inimitable Walsh and Rae, but it’s ultimately hard to care too much about a caddish protagonist like Norman — or, for that matter, about the clichéd “women are crazy!” sentiment that hums nastily under the antics of Dori’s unorthodox family gathering.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Twi-hards, Beliebers and Whovians have nothing on the cult of Jane Austen, whose beribboned ranks are ripe for satire. Unfortunately, this scattershot comedy only occasionally hits the mark.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    No personal revelations surface in “This Is Us.” Also, no narrative, no conflict — no differentiation between band members, even, besides the designation of dark-eyed Zayn as “the mysterious one” (he likes to paint).
    • 25 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Director Mark L. Mann seems to be searching for the meaning in aimlessness, and in lowered expectations. But too often the narrative left me feeling the titular “um.”
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    This pastiche of sitcomy episodes never gels into a plot.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    It’s all headed for a showdown, of course, and duly delivers, though Crudup and Taylor are the only ones who really seem to have a handle on the New Yawk accent.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    It is admirably unsparing and gloomily atmospheric. And I looked at my watch a bunch of times.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Are Some Girl(s) like this? Yes. But I left this movie with no additional insight on why.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    The birth of the titular infant — what the whole movie’s leading up to — is just an anticlimactic mess.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Like the rest of Dear Mr. Watterson, it’s a good-hearted gesture. But unlike Calvin’s alter ego Spaceman Spiff, this film never manages to achieve liftoff.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Italian director Carlo Carlei has a background in TV movies, and this film, plodding and earnest, seems meant for the small screen, too.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Teen Lisa Johnson (Abigail Breslin) is trapped in a kind of undead, unfunny “Groundhog Day,” living one particular 24 hours with her family over and over.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    As a distinctly not-insider, though, I would have benefited more from a broader portrait of the woman herself, and how she became such a legend.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Director Suri Krishnamma capably depicts the darkness in Jim’s head with his shadowy surroundings, misanthropic inner monologue and increasingly frequent hallucinations, and Griffith’s vulnerable performance is a standout. But the film’s final third seems needlessly graphic.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Despite all its problems, The Last Days on Mars serves up a deliciously shivery hypothetical: Wouldn’t we all secretly love it if the Mars rover sent back footage of a “walker” or two?
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    As much fun as it is, this all-star tribute is awfully one-note, never questioning Gordon’s seemingly casual habit of befriending only the ultra-famous.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    None of this is particularly innovative, although Garcia and the elder Farmiga develop a nice spark and a gentle humor in their characters’ stolen day together.