For 178 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Sara Stewart's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Wetlands
Lowest review score: 0 Would You Rather
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 65 out of 178
  2. Negative: 47 out of 178
178 movie reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Just in time for Mexico’s Day of the Dead holiday comes this gloriously colorful animated musical, which almost (but not quite) makes up in visuals what it lacks in snappy dialogue.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Are Some Girl(s) like this? Yes. But I left this movie with no additional insight on why.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    The birth of the titular infant — what the whole movie’s leading up to — is just an anticlimactic mess.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Like the rest of Dear Mr. Watterson, it’s a good-hearted gesture. But unlike Calvin’s alter ego Spaceman Spiff, this film never manages to achieve liftoff.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Italian director Carlo Carlei has a background in TV movies, and this film, plodding and earnest, seems meant for the small screen, too.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Teen Lisa Johnson (Abigail Breslin) is trapped in a kind of undead, unfunny “Groundhog Day,” living one particular 24 hours with her family over and over.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    As a distinctly not-insider, though, I would have benefited more from a broader portrait of the woman herself, and how she became such a legend.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Director Suri Krishnamma capably depicts the darkness in Jim’s head with his shadowy surroundings, misanthropic inner monologue and increasingly frequent hallucinations, and Griffith’s vulnerable performance is a standout. But the film’s final third seems needlessly graphic.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Despite all its problems, The Last Days on Mars serves up a deliciously shivery hypothetical: Wouldn’t we all secretly love it if the Mars rover sent back footage of a “walker” or two?
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    As much fun as it is, this all-star tribute is awfully one-note, never questioning Gordon’s seemingly casual habit of befriending only the ultra-famous.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Sweet and funny — largely thanks to James Corden in the lead role — it’s never particularly surprising.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    None of this is particularly innovative, although Garcia and the elder Farmiga develop a nice spark and a gentle humor in their characters’ stolen day together.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Not surprisingly in this tale of desperate men, the only women are top-heavy cartoon characters — literally, animated sequences illustrate Frank’s stories — or live-action betrayers, like Dakota Fanning’s Annie, Frank’s ex-girlfriend. I found the cartoons more interesting.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    The film strains credulity as it hurtles toward its conclusion.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    A rather unremarkable, if endearing, entry in the quirky rom-com genre.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    From time to time, it works.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Given the scarcity of movies about lust from the female point of view, this is kind of a bummer.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    While absolutely nothing in Grand Piano makes the least bit of sense, it is admittedly gorgeous to look at and listen to. Give Mira a decent script, and he might be a director to be reckoned with.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Love is the weak link in this clumsily titled rom-com, which plays a bit like a hipster infomercial for Austin, Texas.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    So why isn’t They Came Together more uniformly hilarious? Perhaps it’s that elusive problem of trying to explain why a thing is funny in the first place: Spelling it out deflates the joke.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    The Pretty One does find a handful of genuinely sweet moments in which Basel and Laurel bond on letting their respective freak flags fly. Like the film itself, Kazan is at her best when she’s not trying so hard to be cute.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    This Disney sequel to 2013’s “Planes” is a lot like flying coach: serviceable, but not trying that hard.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    The many silences in Hide Your Smiling Faces don’t speak quite loudly enough, and the film ultimately gets bogged down by its own ponderousness.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Nobody does the rebellious-elder thing as well as Duvall, and whenever he’s center stage in A Night in Old Mexico, this scrappy film from Spanish director Emilio Aragon is entertaining enough.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    For parents of very young children looking for a weekend distraction, “Color City” is passable fare — and will at least inspire kiddies to finish what they start, coloring-wise.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Small Time has its heart in the right place, but its screenplay’s in serious need of a tuneup.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Well-intentioned, if ultimately underwhelming, ode to the ongoing fight for a cure.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Compared to another recent teen weepie, “The Fault in Our Stars,” this one comes up wanting. That film’s strong point was the delight its heroine took in detonating romantic clichés; If I Stay seems determined to keep them on life support.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    The script’s by Robert Ben Garant, also behind last year’s scary-movie spoof “Hell Baby,” and this one teeters right on the edge of laughable, with its V.C. Andrews-like series of goth twists.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Gregg, who previously directed the very dark comedy “Choke,” never quite settles on a tone; from the opening scenes, in which Molly Shannon plays a neurotic stage mom and Allison Janney a chilly casting agent, it seems he’s going that way again, but a dramatic twist sends the film into less plausible territory.

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