Scott Foundas
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For 795 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Scott Foundas' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Bloody Sunday
Lowest review score: 0 Come Out and Play
Score distribution:
795 movie reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The emotional truthfulness of Clean enters into our bloodstreams with its muted vigor, and we find ourselves getting hooked by this tale of getting unhooked.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    This ridiculously entertaining sequel is that rare part deux that leaves you hankering for part trois. The action is, in a word, spectacular, but also playful, inventive and witty.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    This is still powerful, undiluted stuff -- a jolt of backwoods moonshine whiskey injected into the veins of the atrophied American relationship drama.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    This meticulously well-made picture is disarmingly funny at times - not least during the ballet of bloody absurdity that is the assassination itself - but also subdued and straight-faced, with one eye planted on 1979 and the other on the violent student demonstrations looming in the distance.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The Weather Man begs to be taken seriously and can't easily be dismissed; it kicks around in your mind for a good long while after you've seen it. Cage, who does his finest work since "Leaving Las Vegas," has stripped himself bare of the patented tics and mannerisms he honed in one Jerry Bruckheimer movie too many.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Its jazzy rhythm and economy of form place it closer to a 1950s film noir, shot through with humor so dark you need a flashlight to see it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Queen Latifah gives a spectacular performance in this hugely enjoyable wish-fulfillment fantasy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    This is some of the best filmmaking ever done by director Richard Donner, a longtime Hollywood journeyman known more for his proficient deployment of three long-running movie franchises (The Omen, Superman and Lethal Weapon) than for his lyricism.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Shot quickly and cheaply in high-definition video and almost entirely on one set, the movie has almost zero visual energy, but it teems with snappy dialogue and the same carnival anarchy Lumet brought to "Dog Day Afternoon" and "Network."
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The heist at the heart of Inside Man is brilliant, and so is the movie.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    It's the kind of movie that used to be called "trashy good fun," only there's nothing trashy about it: Gunn, who scripted the 2004 "Dawn of the Dead" remake, is clearly punch-drunk with horror-movie love; Slither is, among other things, a freewheeling homage to "The Blob, Invasion of the Body Snatchers" and just about everything by George Romero.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    At once playful and thorough, the documentary is also stacked teased-hair high with wicked performance footage.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    This remarkable film from Australia, the debut feature of writer-director Cate Shortland, moves to the lyrical rhythms and unhurried pace of a 1970s road movie.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Becomes one of those wonderfully weird adventure stories beloved of children who don't mind getting a good old-fashioned case of the heebie-jeebies. It's kind of a blast for adults too.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Not just the funniest but the smartest comedy around by a mile.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    This is also an acidly funny work, even if the humor is that of a man who drinks to stave off the pain and madness of sobriety. In his finest performance since "Drugstore Cowboy," Dillon plays Chinanski with funereal grandiosity.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    As before, Bujalski's preference for nonprofessional actors, his ear for the rhythms of conversation among bright young 20-somethings and his adept use of a roving, hand-held camera (this time shooting in fuzzy black and white) lend the film an invigorating energy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    As merry pranksters they have no match, and as they age (Knoxville is 35 now), they only grow in appeal. As they proudly hurl their tattooed (by ink and battle scars) bodies into harm's way, a devilish glint in their eyes, it's as if they've discovered the fountain of youth, and its name is Jackass.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    For the soul of Gondry's work, it seems to me, is neither its soaring flights of visual fancy nor its sometimes crude slapstick, but rather its pained understanding of a generation hopelessly tongue-tied when it comes to matters of the heart.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    It's forceful and alive and spilling over with crazy poetry.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The boldest provocation of Mitchell’s sweet, tender and gently funny film may be its exuberant celebration of community and togetherness at a cultural moment rife with fatalism and disconnect.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Infamous is the better Capote film, yes, but also the less easily digestible one, the more eccentric one and -- yes -- the gayer one.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The actors are superb -- especially Smith, who exudes some of the live-wire charisma of the young Sean Penn in Rosenthal's "Bad Boys," and the smoldering Brewster.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The gimmick is simple but devastatingly effective: Never once breaking character or acknowledging that he’s in on the joke, the Jew-fearing, grammatically challenged reporter ingratiates himself with his unsuspecting, average-American victims before uproariously turning the tables on them.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    That may not exactly thrill those who admire the Saw films only for their splatter quotient, but all told, this is a more affecting study in grief, guilt and human frailty than "Babel."
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    It's something of a family affair -- only this time, instead of casting his relatives in the leading roles, Ceylan has cast himself and his real-life wife, Ebru, as Isa and Bahar. And if, in the hands of a lesser filmmaker, such a decision might foster a mood of lurid home-movie voyeurism, both Ceylans are such commanding and subtly expressive performers that any charges of nepotism here are as erroneous as in the storied collaborations of John Cassavetes and Gena Rowlands.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Much of the film is as strange and oddly beautiful as one of Arbus' own photographs, bold in its attempt to find new ways of cracking the biopic chestnut and sensitive in its portrayal of a 1950s woman who, like so many of her contemporaries, finds herself imprisoned in a "Good Housekeeping" nightmare.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Whereas "Nine Queens" was a movie of clockwork precision and blindsiding reversals, El Aura is more internalized and digressive but no less striking, in large part thanks to Darin's mesmerizing performance.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    What gives Rocky Balboa its unexpected pathos is the titanic humility of Stallone's performance, the earnestness with which he plays a man knocked down (but not out) by the ravages of time.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    At its best, Behind the Mask offers some, um, cutting insights about mass-media blood lust and the cult of the serial killer, and in Baesel, who is by turns charming, manic and thoroughly scary, it has a gifted young actor who clearly relishes a role he can sink his pitchfork into.

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