Scott Foundas
Select another critic »
For 773 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Scott Foundas' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 The Intruder
Lowest review score: 0 Reasonable Doubt
Score distribution:
773 movie reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Infamous is the better Capote film, yes, but also the less easily digestible one, the more eccentric one and -- yes -- the gayer one.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The actors are superb -- especially Smith, who exudes some of the live-wire charisma of the young Sean Penn in Rosenthal's "Bad Boys," and the smoldering Brewster.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The gimmick is simple but devastatingly effective: Never once breaking character or acknowledging that he’s in on the joke, the Jew-fearing, grammatically challenged reporter ingratiates himself with his unsuspecting, average-American victims before uproariously turning the tables on them.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    That may not exactly thrill those who admire the Saw films only for their splatter quotient, but all told, this is a more affecting study in grief, guilt and human frailty than "Babel."
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    It's something of a family affair -- only this time, instead of casting his relatives in the leading roles, Ceylan has cast himself and his real-life wife, Ebru, as Isa and Bahar. And if, in the hands of a lesser filmmaker, such a decision might foster a mood of lurid home-movie voyeurism, both Ceylans are such commanding and subtly expressive performers that any charges of nepotism here are as erroneous as in the storied collaborations of John Cassavetes and Gena Rowlands.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Much of the film is as strange and oddly beautiful as one of Arbus' own photographs, bold in its attempt to find new ways of cracking the biopic chestnut and sensitive in its portrayal of a 1950s woman who, like so many of her contemporaries, finds herself imprisoned in a "Good Housekeeping" nightmare.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Whereas "Nine Queens" was a movie of clockwork precision and blindsiding reversals, El Aura is more internalized and digressive but no less striking, in large part thanks to Darin's mesmerizing performance.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    What gives Rocky Balboa its unexpected pathos is the titanic humility of Stallone's performance, the earnestness with which he plays a man knocked down (but not out) by the ravages of time.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    At its best, Behind the Mask offers some, um, cutting insights about mass-media blood lust and the cult of the serial killer, and in Baesel, who is by turns charming, manic and thoroughly scary, it has a gifted young actor who clearly relishes a role he can sink his pitchfork into.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    It all sounds like a recipe for the most noxious liberal jerk-off movie since "Crash," but in the hands of writer-director Richard LaGravenese, Freedom Writers turns out to be a superb piece of mainstream entertainment -- not an agonized debate over the principles of modern education à la "The History Boys," but a simple, straightforward and surprisingly affecting story of one woman who managed to make a difference.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    In his best film to date, Nick Cassavetes directs with ferocious energy, taking scenes past their logical stopping points and pushing his actors (particularly Foster, who can be as terrifying as Edward Norton in "American History X") to, but never over, the precipice of absurdity.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Here is one of the best American actors (Chris Cooper) in one of his best parts.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    This is gloriously self-aware hokum, a fantasy movie that is, above all, about our need for fantasy and escapism -- and even our need for movies like The Astronaut Farmer -- to help us combat the depression and disappointments of the everyday.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    A richly compelling story of family and self-discovery.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Though Akel and Mass share writing credit, Chalk was actually shot in a loose, improvisational manner in the mode of Christopher Guest's films, and its best set pieces are like devastatingly effective pinpricks puncturing the Hollywood hot-air balloon of inspirational teacher/coach melodramas.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The film arrives at a familiar conclusion -- that war is hell -- but the getting there is made uniquely unsettling by Dumont's relentlessly anti-psychological disposition.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Provided you don't think too long or hard about it (and why ever would you?), Live Free or Die Hard is infectious good fun, and a tremendous encouragement to the middle aged.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Crammed into a lively 85-minute package delivered with loads of dark humor and cinematic flair, this is a worthy winner of Sundance's Grand Jury prize for documentary.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Jolting narrative ellipses sometimes threatens to bring the whole house of cards tumbling down. What never lessens is the movie's rapturous eroticism, and the exquisite longing in each one of Yu Hong's sideways glances.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Director Andrew Wagner draws topnotch work from a pro cast in Starting Out in the Evening, a wise, carefully observed chamber drama.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Margot at the Wedding gives its characters (and us) something to laugh about.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    The film’s appeal is at once sentimental and perverse: It’s not every day that you get to see a 92-year-old woman soloing on “Should I Stay Or Should I Go.” Not surprisingly, a feature remake is already in the works.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    This won't be remembered as one of the prodigiously talented Armstrong's great films (My Brilliant Career, High Tide, Little Women), but it's still 90 percent better than everything else out there.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Anderson and his very fine cast keep things chugging along at a breathless pace, complete with a midfilm reversal of fortune nearly as unexpected as "Psycho's" shower scene. All aboard!
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    "Old Joy" helmer Kelly Reichardt plays to her strengths in Wendy and Lucy, a modest yet deeply felt road movie about an idealistic young drifter, her faithful canine and the wide-open spaces of the Pacific Northwest.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    At the picture’s best, it recalls Michael Winterbottom's "24 Hour Party People" in its tribute to the music of the times and the way in which that music provided a voice to a generation of social misfits.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Above all a rousing entertainment.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Richly satisfying both as subversive, music-biz primer and as gritty, true-life underdog story.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Unabashedly tasteless, wholly trashy and, also, hugely entertaining.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Scott Foundas
    Kiarostami shoots Africa with an uncanny verisimilitude, coming close here to his idea of a "poetic cinema" indebted more to poetry and music than the theatrical novelistic storytelling tradition.